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May 24, 2016

ILLUSIO to Present at 2016 Virtual Reality Summit in Seoul, South Korea

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, biotech/medical, computing, virtual reality

AR for plastic surgery.


ILLUSIO, the next generation in computer imaging for plastic surgery, will be presenting at the 2016 Virtual Reality Summit in Seoul, South Korea on June 22. The conference is expected to attract thousands of people interested in the latest applications for virtual reality and augmented reality.

ILLUSIO CEO Ethan Winner will present the Company’s use of augmented reality for plastic surgery imaging. ILLUSIO combines the latest in 3D augmented reality technology with real-time morphing animation, providing a platform for plastic surgeons and their patients to visually communicate.

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May 24, 2016

Wolverton: VR’s father worried about technology’s future

Posted by in categories: futurism, virtual reality

Father of VR worried.


One might think that Jaron Lanier would be elated right now.

More than 30 years after his pioneering work in virtual reality, VR finally appears to be on the verge of becoming a mass market phenomenon. Major companies are investing in the technology; high-profile products are hitting store shelves; and developers of all sorts are creating VR experiences.

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May 24, 2016

A Battery Made From Metal and Air Is Electrifying the Developing World

Posted by in categories: computing, mobile phones, solar power, sustainability, transportation

Got to luv this.


Is this brand new type of battery the key to clean energy and off-grid electricity?

Lithium-ion batteries are having a moment. After becoming the de facto battery in laptops and cell phones over the years, they’re now starting to power electric cars (like those made by Tesla) and plug into the power grid.

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May 24, 2016

Surface area is a highly relevant dose metric for nanoparticle toxicity assessments

Posted by in category: nanotechnology

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Become a Spotlight guest author! Have you just published a scientific paper or have other exciting developments to share with the nanotechnology community? Here is how to publish on nanowerk.com.

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May 24, 2016

UltraMemory Turns to NanoSpice, NanoSpice Giga From ProPlus Design Solutions for Design of Super-Broadband, Large-Scale Memory

Posted by in categories: computing, innovation

Nice.


/EINPresswire.com/ — SAN JOSE, CA — (Marketwired) — 05/24/16 — UltraMemory Inc. (UltraMemory) has selected NanoSpice™ and NanoSpice Giga™ from ProPlus Design Solutions, Inc., the leading technology provider of giga-scale parallel SPICE simulation, SPICE modeling solutions and Design-for-Yield (DFY) applications, to simulate its super-broadband, super large-scale memory design.

UltraMemory is developing innovative 3D DRAM chip, which includes Through Chip Interface (TCI), enabling low-cost and low-power wireless communication between stacked DARM when compared to TSV technology.

Highly accurate and high-capacity SPICE simulation was necessary because it needed to simulate several DRAM chips with analog functions. UltraMemory’s decision to adopt NanoSpice, a high-performance parallel SPICE simulator, and NanoSpice Giga, the industry’s only GigaSpice simulator, came after an extensive evaluation of commercial SPICE and FastSPICE circuit simulators. NanoSpice and NanoSpice Giga have been integrated in UltraMemory’s existing design flows to replace other SPICE and FastSPICE simulators to provide full circuit simulation solutions from small block simulation to full-chip verification.

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May 24, 2016

Powering nanotechnology with the world’s smallest engine

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nanotechnology, robotics/AI

More information on ANTs.


In the minuscule world of nanotechnology, big steps are rare. But a recent development has the potential to massively improve our lives: an engine measuring 200 billionths of a metre, which could power tiny robots to fight diseases in living cells.

Life itself is proof of the extreme effectiveness of nanotechnology — the manipulation of matter on a molecular or atomic scale — in which DNA, proteins and enzymes can all be considered as machinery. In fact, researchers have managed to make micro-propellers using tiny strands of DNA. These strands can be stitched together so freely and precisely that the practise is known as “DNA origami”. However, DNA origami lacks force and operational speed (it takes time measurable in seconds), reducing its robotic function.

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May 24, 2016

Precise atom implants in silicon provide a first step toward practical quantum computers

Posted by in categories: computing, particle physics, quantum physics

Nice.


Sandia National Laboratories has taken a first step toward creating a practical quantum computer, able to handle huge numbers of computations instantaneously.

Here’s the recipe:

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May 24, 2016

Where Is New Physics Hiding, And How Can We Find It?

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics

The Standard Models of particle physics and cosmology don’t add up to all there is. What might be the next giant leap forward?

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May 24, 2016

US biochemist wins award for rewriting DNA to mimic evolution

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, engineering, evolution

US biochemical engineer Frances Arnold on Tuesday won a million-euro technology prize in Finland for her work on “directed evolution”, a method of rewriting DNA to improve medicines and develop green fuels.

“Frances Arnold receives the 2016 Millennium Technology Prize in recognition of her discoveries that launched the field of ‘directed evolution’, which mimics natural evolution to create new and better proteins in the laboratory,” the Technology Academy Finland, which awards the prize at two-year intervals, said in a statement.

Arnold, 59, who is a professor of chemical engineering at California Institute of Technology, said her work made it possible to “solve human problems”, such as replacing toxic chemicals like fossil fuels.

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May 24, 2016

Could Wi-Fi be replaced

Posted by in category: internet

Will Wi-Fi routers be outdone by a network of smart light bulbs?

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