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Nov 23, 2016

How will quantum computing impact security processes?

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, encryption, mobile phones, quantum physics

How does one prevent hacking from a QC system? Easy, on board to QC first before others do.


Quantum computers have the potential to perform calculations faster than ever possible before, inviting a significant rethink in how we approach cyber security.

Given the amount of research being ploughed into this area, we are likely to see a commercially viable machine in the near future, so cryptographers and the cyber security industry in general should work to have a clear view on the implications way ahead of that achievement.

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Nov 23, 2016

Qubits in brain can make it a quantum computer?

Posted by in categories: biological, computing, neuroscience, particle physics, quantum physics

The mere mention of “quantum consciousness” makes most physicists cringe, as the phrase seems to evoke the vague, insipid musings of a New Age guru. But if a new hypothesis proves to be correct, quantum effects might indeed play some role in human cognition. Matthew Fisher, a physicist at the University of California, Santa Barbara, raised eyebrows late last year when he published a paper in Annals of Physics proposing that the nuclear spins of phosphorus atoms could serve as rudimentary “qubits” in the brain — which would essentially enable the brain to function like a quantum computer.

Isher’s hypothesis faces the same daunting obstacle that has plagued microtubules: a phenomenon called quantum decoherence. To build an operating quantum computer, you need to connect qubits — quantum bits of information — in a process called entanglement. But entangled qubits exist in a fragile state. They must be carefully shielded from any noise in the surrounding environment. Just one photon bumping into your qubit would be enough to make the entire system “decohere,” destroying the entanglement and wiping out the quantum properties of the system. It’s challenging enough to do quantum processing in a carefully controlled laboratory environment, never mind the warm, wet, complicated mess that is human biology, where maintaining coherence for sufficiently long periods of time is well nigh impossible.

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Nov 23, 2016

Black Mirror Season 3

Posted by in category: entertainment

I just caught up with Season 3 of Black Mirror, the dystopian science-fiction British television series on Netflix. I found the six episodes riveting, but often sort of nightmarish. Think high-tech, R-rated Twilight Zone.

Spoiler alert: the following mentions some things that are not immediately revealed in the episodes, similar to the trailers below (but does not give away endings).

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Nov 23, 2016

Ageing Societies 2016

Posted by in categories: business, economics, finance, health, life extension

Longevity a challenge or an opportunity?

This autumn, The Economist Events will bring global leaders from business, finance and health care together with policymakers to explore the opportunities of an ageing world.

Together they will discuss how best to adapt financial products and realign business and public policies in ways that will drive economic growth and mitigate problems that ageing societies could otherwise bring.

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Nov 23, 2016

Artificial Brains For Artificial Intelligence

Posted by in categories: futurism, robotics/AI

Scientists are trying to create an artificial brain to learn artificial intelligence.

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Nov 23, 2016

Google Is in a Fierce Global Race for Scarce AI Talent

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

Google is trying to get its hooks into the world’s top deep learning talent before its competitors do.

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Nov 23, 2016

A deep-learning machine was trained to spot criminals

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

The effort aimed at identifying criminals from their mugshots raises serious ethical issues about how we should use artificial intelligence.

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Nov 23, 2016

How Physics Falls Apart If The EMdrive Works

Posted by in categories: physics, space travel

How, exactly, the laws of physics will crumble if NASA’s impossible space engine turns out to really work.

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Nov 23, 2016

‘Shazam for shoes’ shows how AI could transform your style

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

Shoegazer, a prototype sneaker-spotting app, demonstrates the ways artificial intelligence could change how we shop.

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Nov 23, 2016

Minimum Interstellar Precursor Mission

Posted by in categories: energy, satellites

With the continuous advancements in nano-satellite technology, there has been a significant increase in proposed CubeSat missions for sophisticated space exploration. Due to their cost efficiency, rapid development and ongoing miniaturization of satellite bus systems and scientific payloads, CubeSats offer the potential to increase the range of capabilities of deep space explorations. Missions already on launch manifests such as Mars Cube One, Lunar Flashlight, and NEA Scout will demonstrate the use of CubeSat technology for planetary explorations. CubeSat capabilities are also being expanded for other deep space missions and for the detection technique of Near Earth Objects (NEOs). With the increase in anticipated that CubeSats will increasingly become an attractive option to conduct cost-effective interplanetary missions. This increase in interest and development allows further advancement of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the present technology, which can be extrapolated for extra-solar and near interstellar missions. The work presented in this paper addresses the potential utilization for interplanetary and near interstellar missions using technology developed from off-the-shelf components. The paper introduces the current CubeSat technologies, their baselines TRLs, and the requirements needed to conduct such missions. It further presents the feasibility study of the available CubeSat technology to conduct near interstellar mission by the year 2030. The feasibility of different propulsion, communication, electrical and power subsystems with a TRL level of 5 and higher in the next 10 years is evaluated. This paper outlines the fundamental mission and spacecraft architecture required to exit the solar system using miniaturized space system technologies. The analysis and suggestions presented in this paper help recognize the resourcefulness of CubeSat for interplanetary and the edge of the solar system missions.

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