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Apr 13, 2018

Robot Cities: Three Urban Prototypes for Future Living

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, finance, governance, internet, robotics/AI

Before I started working on real-world robots, I wrote about their fictional and historical ancestors. This isn’t so far removed from what I do now. In factories, labs, and of course science fiction, imaginary robots keep fueling our imagination about artificial humans and autonomous machines.

Real-world robots remain surprisingly dysfunctional, although they are steadily infiltrating urban areas across the globe. This fourth industrial revolution driven by robots is shaping urban spaces and urban life in response to opportunities and challenges in economic, social, political, and healthcare domains. Our cities are becoming too big for humans to manage.

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Apr 13, 2018

12 Futuristic Technologies That Could Become Reality in 2018

Posted by in categories: business, privacy, robotics/AI, transportation

In the last year, the business and consumer markets alike have seen the release of advanced technologies that were once considered the stuff of science fiction. Smart gadgets that control every facet of your home, self-driving vehicles, facial and biometric identification systems and more have begun to emerge, giving us a glimpse of the high-tech reality we’re moving towards.

To find out which futuristic technologies are on the horizon, we asked a panel of YEC members the following question:

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Apr 13, 2018

What is relativity? Einstein’s mind-bending theory explained

Posted by in categories: information science, nuclear energy

Albert Einstein is famous for his theory of relativity, and GPS navigation and nuclear energy would be impossible without the equation e=mc2.

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Apr 13, 2018

Bioquark Inc. — Illuminations Media — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, business, health, innovation, life extension, neuroscience, science, transhumanism

Apr 13, 2018

Bioquark Inc. — Core Brain Podcast — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, biotech/medical, disruptive technology, DNA, futurism, genetics, neuroscience, science

http://www.corebrainjournal.com/2018/04/211-regenerative-bio…cs-pastor/

Apr 13, 2018

Wormhole Entanglement and the Firewall Paradox

Posted by in categories: cosmology, quantum physics

A bold new idea aims to link two famously discordant descriptions of nature. In doing so, it may also reveal how space-time owes its existence to the spooky connections of quantum information.

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Apr 13, 2018

The World’s Tiniest Computer Is Smaller Than A Grain Of Salt

Posted by in category: computing

Take a microscopic look at the world’s tiniest computer, which is smaller than a grain of salt. (via Seeker)

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Apr 13, 2018

Non-profit’s $300 hepatitis C cure as effective as $84,000 alternative

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Exclusive: 71 million people stand to benefit from reduced price treatment for virus which can lead to liver cirrhosis, cancer and death.

Thu 12 Apr 2018 01.00 EDT Last modified on Thu 12 Apr 2018 19.55 EDT.

Continue reading “Non-profit’s $300 hepatitis C cure as effective as $84,000 alternative” »

Apr 13, 2018

Researchers find combination for small data storage and tinier computers

Posted by in categories: computing, materials

It may sound like a futuristic device out of a spy novel, a computer the size of a pinhead, but according to new research from the University of New Hampshire, it might be a reality sooner than once thought. Researchers have discovered that using an easily made combination of materials might be the way to offer a more stable environment for smaller and safer data storage, ultimately leading to miniature computers.

“We’re really optimistic about the possibilities,” said Jiadong Zang, assistant professor of physics. “There is a push in the computer industry toward smaller and more powerful , yet current combinations of materials can create volatile situations, where data can be lost once the device is turned off. Our research points to this new combination as a much safer option. We’re excited that our findings might have the potential to change the landscape of information technology.”

In their study, recently published in the journal Science Advances, the researchers outline their proposed combination which would allow for a more stable perpendicular anisotropic energy (PMA), the key driving component in a computer’s RAM (random-access memory) or . The material would be made up of ultrathin films, known as Fe monolayers, grown on top of non-magnetic substances, in this case X nitride substrate, where X could be boron, gallium, aluminum or indium. According to the research, this combination showed anisotropic energy would increase by fifty times, from 1 meV to 50 meV, allowing for larger amounts of data to be stored in smaller environments. There is a provisional patent pending which has been filed by UNHInnovation, which advocates for, manages, and promotes UNH’s intellectual property.

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Apr 13, 2018

Using an algorithm to reduce energy bills—rain or shine

Posted by in categories: information science, robotics/AI, solar power, sustainability

Researchers proposed implementing the residential energy scheduling algorithm by training three action dependent heuristic dynamic programming (ADHDP) networks, each one based on a weather type of sunny, partly cloudy, or cloudy. ADHDP networks are considered ‘smart,’ as their response can change based on different conditions.

“In the future, we expect to have various types of supplies to every household including the grid, windmills, and biogenerators. The issues here are the varying nature of these power sources, which do not generate electricity at a stable rate,” said Derong Liu, a professor with the School of Automation at the Guangdong University of Technology in China and an author on the paper. “For example, power generated from windmills and solar panels depends on the weather, and they vary a lot compared to the more stable power supplied by the grid. In order to improve these power sources, we need much smarter algorithms in managing/scheduling them.”

The details were published on the January 10th issue of IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica, a joint bimonthly publication of the IEEE and the Chinese Association of Automation.

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