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Oct 12, 2018

Weaponised AI is coming. Are algorithmic forever wars our future?

Posted by in categories: information science, military, robotics/AI

The Pentagon is pushing algorithmic warfare, but big tech’s involvement assumes the US military is a benevolent force.

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Oct 12, 2018

World’s fastest camera freezes time at 10 trillion frames per second

Posted by in categories: biological, physics

What happens when a new technology is so precise that it operates on a scale beyond our characterization capabilities? For example, the lasers used at INRS produce ultrashort pulses in the femtosecond range (10-15 s), which is far too short to visualize. Although some measurements are possible, nothing beats a clear image, says INRS professor and ultrafast imaging specialist Jinyang Liang. He and his colleagues, led by Caltech’s Lihong Wang, have developed what they call T-CUP: the world’s fastest camera, capable of capturing 10 trillion (1013) frames per second (Fig. 1). This new camera literally makes it possible to freeze time to see phenomena—and even light—in extremely slow motion.

In recent years, the junction between innovations in non-linear optics and imaging has opened the door for new and highly efficient methods for microscopic analysis of dynamic phenomena in biology and physics. But harnessing the potential of these methods requires a way to record in at a very short temporal resolution—in a single exposure.

Using current imaging techniques, measurements taken with must be repeated many times, which is appropriate for some types of inert samples, but impossible for other more fragile ones. For example, laser-engraved glass can tolerate only a single laser pulse, leaving less than a picosecond to capture the results. In such a case, the imaging technique must be able to capture the entire process in real time.

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Oct 12, 2018

Artist explains quantum physics through poetry

Posted by in category: quantum physics

A qubit by any other name would still confound as succinctly. Poet and Professor Amy Catanzano seeks to unveil the mysteries of quantum physics with poetry.

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Oct 12, 2018

Surprise Life Found Thriving 2,000 Feet Underground

Posted by in category: alien life

Cyanobacteria were long thought to need the sun to survive. But a new study suggests otherwise and hints at fresh possibilities for life on Mars.

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Oct 12, 2018

I’m cheating. Photo

Posted by in category: futurism

I’m cheating.

Found this book. It was written in 1968.

Oh how things change.

Continue reading “I’m cheating. Photo” »

Oct 12, 2018

Scientists Turn Nuclear Waste into Diamond Batteries That’ll Last for Thousands of Years

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, drones, nuclear energy, satellites

This technology may someday power spacecraft, satellites, high-flying drones, and pacemakers.

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Oct 12, 2018

Researchers quickly harvest 2-D materials, bringing them closer to commercialization

Posted by in categories: materials, particle physics

Since the 2003 discovery of the single-atom-thick carbon material known as graphene, there has been significant interest in other types of 2-D materials as well.

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Oct 12, 2018

The mind-blowing world of tomorrow’s smart materials

Posted by in categories: business, engineering, sustainability

For businesses that want to maintain or increase their bottom line, this means re-engineering the fundamentals of their supply chain by developing or adopting new material solutions that achieve a lot more with a lot less.

“The smart companies, manufacturers and brands are the ones who are starting to invest in sustainable material innovation,” says Caroline Till, co-author of Radical Matter: Rethinking Materials for a Sustainable Future, adding, “There’s a thirst from consumers for this.” It’s clear that tomorrow’s leaders will be those who are brave enough to invest in this research today.

For The Future Laboratory’s new Material Far Futures report, we’ve compiled the most transformative case studies in material innovation into the 10 paradigms that we believe will disrupt industry in the coming decades, each with original visualisations from Studio Brasch. From fabrics that generate power through motion and new forms of kinetic architecture to bio-engineering’s impact on luxury fashion, the materials of tomorrow will be smarter, stronger, more dynamic and, crucially, less ecologically damaging.

Continue reading “The mind-blowing world of tomorrow’s smart materials” »

Oct 12, 2018

Air Force awards contracts for new rocket prototypes to United Launch Alliance, Northrup Grumman and Blue Origin

Posted by in categories: Elon Musk, military, space travel

United Launch Alliance, Northrup Grumman and Blue Origin, a company owned by Amazon-founder Jeff Bezos, were awarded major Air Force contracts Wednesday totaling more than $2 billion to develop next-generation rockets capable of boosting high-value national security payloads into orbit.

Two of the new rockets will be selected in a second competition, providing assured access to space through the next decade and beyond. In a surprise to some observers, SpaceX, the ambitious rocket company founded by Elon Musk, was not among the latest winners in the Pentagon’s Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle program.

The Launch Service Agreements “will facilitate the development of three domestic launch system prototypes and enable the future competitive selection of two National Security Space launch service providers for future procurements, planned for no earlier than fiscal year 2020,” the Air Force said in a statement.

Continue reading “Air Force awards contracts for new rocket prototypes to United Launch Alliance, Northrup Grumman and Blue Origin” »

Oct 12, 2018

A novel topological insulator

Posted by in categories: materials, particle physics

For the first time, physicists have built a unique topological insulator in which optical and electronic excitations hybridize and flow together. They report their discovery in Nature.

Topological insulators are materials with very special properties. They conduct electricity or light only on their surface or edges, not the interior. This unusual characteristic could provide technical innovations, and topological insulators have been the subject of intense global research for several years.

Physicists of Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg (JMU) in Bavaria, Germany, with colleagues from the Technion in Haifa, Israel, and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have reported their discovery in the journal Nature. The team has built the first “exciton-polariton topological insulator,” a topological insulator operating with both light and simultaneously.

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