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Jan 25, 2019

Scientists Figured Out How to Send Secret Messages to Your Ear With Lasers

Posted by in category: military

Scientists have devised a way to communicate secretly by sending laser-transmitted messages directly into the area around a person’s ear.

Humans enjoy talking with one another, and often do so in ways that prevent eavesdroppers from listening in. This new research could have potential military applications—but who knows where else it might find use?

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Jan 25, 2019

Hubble’s deepest space image ever was three years in the making

Posted by in category: space

The Hubble space telescope has been in space for many years now. Of late it has had some challenges, including one that left its W ide Field Camera 3 non-functional for a while. Hubble is back at work, and scientists from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias have shared a new image that took three years to produce. The photo is the deepest image of the Universe ever taken from space.

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Jan 25, 2019

On Transhumanist Manifestos and Dilemmas

Posted by in categories: biological, transhumanism

It’s been almost 10 years since I wrote the first versions of Hamlet’s Transhumanist Dilemma and A Transhumanist Manifesto. And a lot has changed. Including my point of view.

I started with Hamlet. With asking a question: Will technology replace biology?

At the time I felt that this was the contemporary version of Shakespeare’s original human dilemma: to be or not to be.

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Jan 25, 2019

Volvo creates the living seawall in Sydney to help with plastic pollution

Posted by in categories: habitats, materials

Volvo is trying to help the problem of plastic pollution in the oceans by creating the Living Seawall, a new, creative approach to providing a habitat for marine life.

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Jan 25, 2019

Chinese Scientists Cloned Gene-Edited Monkeys With Horrifying Results

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, neuroscience

The monkeys exhibited anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia-like behaviors.

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Jan 25, 2019

Inside an otherworldly mission to prepare humans for Mars

Posted by in category: space

Braving deep isolation and sweaty spacesuits, six “analog astronauts” tested their tools, talents, and grit on a mock trip to the red planet.

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Jan 25, 2019

New therapy turns cancer cells into fat to stop it from spreading

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Metastasis is the leading cause of death from cancer, occurring when cancer cells separate from the original tumor to proliferate elsewhere. These new cancer cells travel through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. Since these bodily systems are thoroughly connected, cancer can spread to a variety of locations. Breast cancer, for example, “tends to spread to the bones, liver, lungs, chest wall, and brain.”

Cancer cell plasticity — an ability that allows cancer cells to shift physiological characteristics dramatically — fosters metastasis and is responsible for cancer’s resistance to treatments. To combat its resistance, researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland decided to turn cancer’s cellular plasticity against itself. They used Rosiglitazone, an anti-diabetic drug, along with MEK inhibitors in mice implanted with breast cancer cells. Their aim was to alter the cancer cells.

The drug combination hijacked the breast cancer cells during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process by which the cells undergo biochemical changes. EMT plays a role in many bodily functions, such as tissue repair. In unaltered cancer cells, EMT allows them to migrate away from the original tumor while maintaining their oncogenic properties.

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Jan 25, 2019

Nanotechnology enables engineers to weld previously un-weldable aluminum alloy

Posted by in categories: nanotechnology, transportation

An aluminum alloy developed in the 1940s has long held promise for use in automobile manufacturing, except for one key obstacle. Although it’s nearly as strong as steel and just one-third the weight, it is almost impossible to weld together using the technique commonly used to assemble body panels or engine parts.

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Jan 25, 2019

A high-carb diet may explain why Okinawans live so long

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, life extension, neuroscience

A very good article on the studies on centenarians of Okinawa, on the importance of carbohydrate / protein ratio in diet, genes, calorie restriction and more: “… Genetic good fortune could be one important factor. Thanks to the geography of the islands, Okinawa’s populations have spent large chunks of their history in relative isolation, which may has given them a unique genetic profile. Preliminary studies suggest this may include a reduced prevalence of a gene variant – APOE4 – that appears to increase the risk of heart disease and Alzheimer’s. They may also be more likely to carry a protective variant of the FOXO3 gene involved in regulating metabolism and cell growth. This results in a shorter stature but also appears to reduce the risk of various age-related diseases, including cancer. Even so, it seems unlikely that good genes would fully explain the Okinawans’ longevity, and lifestyle factors will also be important…”


Emerging evidence suggests a 10:1 ratio of carbohydrates to proteins may protect the body from the ravages of ageing.

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Jan 25, 2019

DIY CRISPR: Genetic Engineering at Home

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, food, genetics

You can now perform CRISPR gene-editing in your kitchen!

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