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Oct 30, 2016

Quantum Teleportation Across The Dark Web

Posted by in categories: encryption, internet, quantum physics

Get Ready Folks! Imagine a QC DarkNet as it will too come.


Quantum teleportation brings to mind Star Trek’s transporter, where crew members are disassembled in one location to be reassembled in another. Real quantum teleportation is a much more subtle effect where information is transferred between entangled quantum states. It’s a quantum trick that could give us the ultimate in secure communication. While quantum teleportation experiments have been performed countless times in the lab, doing it in the real world has proved a bit more challenging. But a recent experiment using a dark fibre portion of the internet has brought quantum teleportation one step closer to real world applications.

The backbone of the internet is a network of optical fibre. Everything from your bank transactions to pictures of your cat travel as beams of light through this fibre network. However there is much more fibre that has been laid than is currently used. This unused portion of the network is known as dark fibre. Other than not being currently used, the dark fiber network has the same properties as the web we currently use. This new experiment used a bit of this dark web in Calgary to teleport a photon state under real world conditions.

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Oct 30, 2016

Inside the Quest for a Real ‘Star Trek’ Warp Drive

Posted by in categories: physics, space travel

It may be a while before starship captains can race across the galaxy, but engineers and physicists have a few ideas for making it so.

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Oct 30, 2016

Neurons from stem cells replace damaged neurons, precisely rewiring into the brain

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, robotics/AI

As shown in this in vivo two-photon image, neuronal transplants (blue) connect with host neurons (yellow) in the adult mouse brain in a highly specific manner, rebuilding neural networks lost upon injury. (credit: Sofia Grade/LMU/Helmholtz Zentrum München)

Embryonic neural stem cells transplanted into damaged areas of the visual cortex of adult mice were able to differentiate into pyramidal cells — forming normal synaptic connections, responding to visual stimuli, and integrating into neural networks — researchers at LMU Munich, the Max Planck Institute for Neurobiology in Martinsried and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have demonstrated.

The adult human brain has very little ability to compensate for nerve-cell loss, so biomedical researchers and clinicians are exploring the possibility of using transplanted nerve cells to replace neurons that have been irreparably damaged as a result of trauma or disease, leading to a lifelong neurological deficit.

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Oct 30, 2016

Get Ready for Magic Leap: New Patent Brings VR Device One Step Closer to Reality

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, military, neuroscience, virtual reality

In Brief:

  • Now with just under $800 million in funding, Florida startup Magic Leap has applied for a patent for its VR/AR headsets, bringing them one step closer to market.
  • From healthcare to the military, VR/AR is being applied to industries far beyond its humble roots in gaming.

Florida-based startup Magic Leap has been getting considerable attention thanks in no small part to the awesome-looking augmented reality video demos it has released. Apart from these videos and the info we could glean from some interviews and Twitter posts, however, we haven’t yet been given a complete explanation of what the company has in store for consumers. What we do know is that it promises an AR experience unlike any other by delivering “neurologically true visual perception.” In short, the brain won’t be able to tell the difference between reality and virtual reality when you are using Magic Leap’s device.

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Oct 30, 2016

Context, Language, and Reasoning in AI: Three Key Challenges

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

The next phase in the AI revolution calls for advances in how the technology addresses and processes data from the non-vision world.

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Oct 30, 2016

What Do People — Not Techies, Not Companies — Think About Artificial Intelligence?

Posted by in categories: employment, robotics/AI

They’re worried about their jobs but otherwise optimistic.

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Oct 30, 2016

Magic Leap goes to Finland in pursuit of Nordic VR and AR talent

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, entertainment, virtual reality

Florida-headquartered Magic Leap has set up a company in Helsinki to gain access to Finland’s vast, Nokia- and gaming-driven reservoir of VR and AR talent.

In July, Magic Leap registered a company in Helsinki with CFO Scott Henry as the chairman of the board. The company did not return my request for a comment.

The Finnish VR and AR companies I spoke with would not confirm or deny working with the company dubbed one of the most secretive startups in the world. But considering the country’s strong know-how in technologies (especially in optics, hardware, and software) that are all highly relevant in the quest for VR/AR domination, it’s no surprise that multinational giants and hot startups are courting the country’s talent pool.

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Oct 30, 2016

What Would a Machine as Smart as God Want?

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

The field of “scientific theology” ponders the ultimate purpose of mind.

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Oct 30, 2016

Neuroscientists Discover an Ignition Switch for Consciousness

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

What’s the Latest?

When Francis Crick, the English scientist who helped discover the structure of DNA, died in 2004, he and a colleague were in the midst of researching the potential existence of an on-off switch for consciousness located somewhere deep within the brain. Crick’s hypothesis likened the proposed switch to an orchestra conductor “to bind all of our different external and internal perceptions together.” Researchers at George Washington University in Washington DC believe they may have found Crick’s conductor. As it happens, it’s located in the exact part of the brain Crick had initially guessed: the claustrum.

What’s the Big Idea?

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Oct 30, 2016

IBM’s Watson AI Recommends Same Treatment as Doctors in 99% of Cancer Cases

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, robotics/AI

In Brief:

  • Watson recommended treatment plans that matched suggestions from oncologists in 99 percent of the cases it analyzed and offered options doctors missed in 30 percent of them.
  • AI could be revolutionary for healthcare as it can process many more research papers and case files than any human doctor could manage.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is about more than just the promise of a robot butler — it can actually save lives. AI’s contribution to the healthcare industry and in medical research could be hugely significant. IBM sees that and wants Watson, its AI technology, at the forefront of this development.

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