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Jul 11, 2019

Japan’s Hayabusa2 probe makes ‘perfect’ touchdown on asteroid

Posted by in categories: materials, space

Japan’s Hayabusa2 probe made a “perfect” touchdown Thursday on a distant asteroid, collecting samples from beneath the surface in an unprecedented mission that could shed light on the origins of the solar system.

“We’ve collected a part of the solar system’s history,” project manager Yuichi Tsuda said at a jubilant press conference hours after the successful landing was confirmed.

“We have never gathered sub-surface material from a celestial body further away than the Moon,” he added.

Jul 11, 2019

Stem Cell Transplants Can Heal Damaged Knees

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

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Jul 11, 2019

At Last, AI beats professionals in six-player poker

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

An artificial intelligence program developed by Carnegie Mellon University in collaboration with Facebook AI has defeated leading professionals in six-player no-limit Texas hold’em poker, the world’s most popular form of poker.

The AI, called Pluribus, defeated professional Darren Elias, who holds the record for most World Poker Tour titles, and Chris “Jesus” Ferguson, winner of six World Series of Poker events. Each pro separately played 5,000 hands of poker against five copies of Pluribus.

In another experiment involving 13 pros, all of whom have won more than $1 million playing poker, Pluribus played five pros at a time for a total of 10,000 hands and again emerged victorious.

Jul 11, 2019

Quantum sensor breakthrough using naturally occurring vibrations in artificial atoms

Posted by in categories: particle physics, quantum physics

A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have discovered a new method that could be used to build quantum sensors with ultra-high precision.

When emit , they do so in discrete packets called photons.

When this light is measured, this discrete or ‘granular’ nature leads to especially low fluctuations in its brightness, as two or more photons are never emitted at the same time.

Jul 11, 2019

ideaXme — Eugene Borukhovich, Global Head, Digital Health Incubation (G4A) at Bayer — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, big data, bioengineering, biotech/medical, business, computing, drones, electronics, finance, health

Jul 11, 2019

Scientists discover how to ‘lock’ heat in place using quantum mechanics

Posted by in categories: engineering, quantum physics

A ground-breaking study conducted by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has revealed a method of using quantum mechanical wave theories to “lock” heat into a fixed position.

Ordinarily, a source of diffuses through a conductive material until it dissipates, but Associate Professor Cheng-Wei Qiu from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the NUS Faculty of Engineering and his team used the principle of anti-parity-time (APT) symmetry to show that it is possible to confine the heat to a small region of a metal ring without it spreading over time.

In the future, this newly demonstrated phenomenon could be used to control in sophisticated ways and optimize efficacy in systems that need cooling. The results of the study were published on 12 April 2019 in the journal Science.

Jul 11, 2019

Secure quantum communications in the microwave range for the first time

Posted by in categories: computing, particle physics, quantum physics

Mikel Sanz, of the Physical Chemistry Department of UPV/EHU, leads the theoretical group for an experiment published by the prestigious journal, Nature Communications. The experiment has managed to prepare a remote quantum state; i.e., absolutely secure communication was established with another, physically separated quantum computer for the first time in the microwave regime. This new technology may bring about a revolution in the next few years.

Within the greater European project of the Quantum Flagship, spearheaded by Mikel Sanz—researcher of the QUTIS Group of the UPV/EHU Physical Chemistry Department—an experiment has been conducted in collaboration with German and Japanese researchers who have managed to develop a protocol for preparing a remote quantum state while conducting in the regime, “which is the frequency at which all quantum computers operate. This is the first time the possibility of doing so in this range has been examined, which may bring about a revolution in the next few years in the field of secure quantum communication and quantum microwave radars,” lead researcher in this project Mikel Sanz observes.

The preparation of a remote quantum state (known as remote state preparation) is based on the phenomenon of quantum entanglement, where sets of entangled particles lose their individuality and behave as single entities, even when spatially separated. “Thus, if two computers share this quantum correlation, performing operations on only one of them can affect the other. Absolutely secure communication can be achieved,” Sanz explains.

Jul 11, 2019

A Japanese spacecraft just grabbed more rocks from the asteroid Ryugu

Posted by in categories: materials, space

Japanese spacecraft landed on the asteroid surface.


Hayabusa2 has collected a second sample from the asteroid’s surface. It could give us a unique insight into how the early solar system was formed.

The procedure: After a few hours of maneuvering, the spacecraft touched down on Ryugu’s surface at 9:15 p.m. US Eastern time yesterday. It then fired a bullet into the asteroid and collected some of the debris stirred up by the shot. The Japanese space agency JAXA tweeted that the mission had been a success and that the space probe had now left the surface again. It’s the second sampling mission after a similar one in April, and it required particularly careful preparations, because any problems could cause the materials gathered during the first operation to be lost. In April, Hayabusa2 had also fired a copper bomb into the asteroid’s surface to expose the rocks beneath, in anticipation of today’s mission.

Continue reading “A Japanese spacecraft just grabbed more rocks from the asteroid Ryugu” »

Jul 11, 2019

Autism mutations — Autism mutations may alter gut function, microbiome

Posted by in categories: genetics, neuroscience

Mutations in the autism gene NLGN3 may alter the gut nervous system of mice.

Jul 11, 2019

Almost 300,000 People Say They’re Gonna Storm Area 51

Posted by in categories: humor, military

Naruto running?


A Facebook event called “Storm Area 51, They Can’t Stop All of Us” has amassed an army of memers, schemers and tinfoil hat-wearing conspirators to raid the top-secret Air Force military base in the middle of Nevada’s desert.

Over 289,000 users confirmed they’re planning to come along, while 314,000 are “interested.” It’s gotten so big that the event is grabbing the attention of local and even international media.

Continue reading “Almost 300,000 People Say They’re Gonna Storm Area 51” »