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Jan 5, 2016

Camera Stabilizer

Posted by in category: electronics

You can shoot in any circumstances and maintaining the image with this device…

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Jan 5, 2016

The Art of Biography — By Joseph Epstein | The Wall Street Journal

Posted by in category: media & arts

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“Patrick Hayes’s “Human 2.0? Life-Writing in the Digital Age” provides a defense of autobiography as it comes through Facebook, Twitter, instant messaging, blogging and the rest.”

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Jan 5, 2016

How to Cultivate the Art of Serendipity — By Pagan Kennedy | The New York Times

Posted by in categories: media & arts, science

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“Do some people have a special talent for serendipity? And if so, why?”

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Jan 5, 2016

How Assistive Technology Is Opening New Doors for ALS Patients

Posted by in categories: innovation, science, wearables
Image credit: iDigitalTrends

Image credit: iDigitalTrends

While the “Ice Bucket Challenge” raised millions to fuel research toward a cure for
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), there are a number of assistive technologies already at work to help those currently affected by the disease. According to Alisa Brownlee, a clinical manager for the ALS Association, more assistive technologies and brain-computer-interfaces are on the way. At present, the largest hurdle is access.

Brownlee noted that the loss of communication is often the hardest part of ALS for someone to endure. As ALS is a progressive disease, there are several forms of assistive technology that are used based on a given patient’s physical status. Each form of that technology will work for awhile, but then patients will have to move on to something else as the disease progresses, she says.

Using computer access as one way to help maintain an ALS patient’s communication skills, ALS patients can transition to a track-ball mouse and on-screen keyboard in lieu of a standard computer mouse. From there, a person can use a head-mount, eye-gaze system, and even a tablet computer with a switch scanner.

Continue reading “How Assistive Technology Is Opening New Doors for ALS Patients” »

Jan 5, 2016

Dolfi — The Tiny Gadget That Could One Day Replace Your Washing Machine

Posted by in category: futurism

Dolfi is a portable device that relies on ultrasound technology to do the work of a washing machine. It can be used anywhere, it’s cheap and silent.

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Jan 5, 2016

Space mining will take a giant leap in 2016

Posted by in category: space

After US passed the Space Act, space mining is going to happen.

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Jan 5, 2016

How Fox’s “The Martian VR Experience” Became Hollywood’s Most Ambitious VR Experiment

Posted by in categories: space, virtual reality

Much more than marketing, the experience lets users feel what it’s like to survive on Mars, just like Mark Watney. Yes, there are potatoes.

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Jan 5, 2016

Could This Man Hold the Secret to Human Regeneration?

Posted by in category: innovation

Michael Levin wants to help people regrow lost limbs. Now he could be on the verge of a breakthrough.

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Jan 5, 2016

Next-generation Wi-Fi 802.11ah announced with almost double the range, lower power

Posted by in categories: energy, food, habitats, health, internet, transportation

The Wi-Fi Alliance branded its next-generation 802.11ah wireless protocol as Wi-Fi HaLow. It is targeted at the Internet of Things (IoT), which includes the smart home, connected car, and digital healthcare, as well as industrial, retail, agriculture, and smart-city environments. Unlike the older and more familiar 802.11 protocols, which mostly use the 2.4 or 5GHz bands, 802.11ah is a sub-gigahertz protocol that uses the 900MHz band. It has an enviable combination of characteristics.

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Jan 5, 2016

The Limit Of Healthy Living: Are We Hitting A Life Expectancy Plateau?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health, life extension

We may be fed a tale of ever expanding life expectancy, but while average lifespans may be rising maximum years are unchanged. If we want to keep extending the clock we need more than antibiotics and nutrition.

The easy work is done

While improving living standards and reducing infant mortality was not an easy job in itself, it extended years without fundamentally changing human biology. The incredible changes brought by the 20th century yielded longevity — but predominantly did so by lifting the majority closer to those luckier few. Even in the ancient world individuals seemingly lived over 80 years old; it was simply a rarer event to do so. You were significantly more likely to be felled by a disease beforehand, and many never reached such an advanced age as a result.

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