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Jul 19, 2016

World-Check terror suspect DB hits the web at just US$6750

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, internet

Want to buy the World-Check terror suspect DB? You can on the Dark Web for $6750.


Last month’s borked Couchdb breach delivers more pain to Thomson Reuters.

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Jul 19, 2016

Darknet Market Raises Its Ugly Head Again

Posted by in categories: internet, law enforcement, security

Their back.


Cyber Mafias The internet has always been the most preferred platform for carrying out illicit activities. The underground black markets are not a new phenomenon in the virtual world. However, these black markets are now becoming more sophisticated and organized. Darkness is one such underground marketplaces which are rising and becoming uglier. Though law enforcement agencies have brought down the number of such illegal platforms, the Darknet markets are up and running. Darknet markets are growing bigger than ever with over $50 million UDS transactions reportedly flowing through these marketplaces and it is a big challenge in front of security agencies and governments to finish this underground industry from its roots.

Decoding Darknet

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Jul 19, 2016

Australian robot gets put to work, herds sheep and cows (Tomorrow Daily 393)

Posted by in categories: food, health, robotics/AI, sustainability

Definitely need this for the farm.


This robot cowboy not only herds cattle, soon it will also monitor the herd’s health and alert ranchers to any injuries or illness to livestock.

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Jul 19, 2016

New detector overcomes key challenge in using light for wireless communications: With data rates of more than 2 gigabits per second, new approach in photodetection could simplify free-space optical communication

Posted by in category: internet

Today’s high-speed wired communication networks use lasers to carry information through optical fibers, but wireless networks are currently based on radio frequencies or microwaves. In an advance that could one day make light-based wireless communications ubiquitous, researchers from Facebook Inc.’s Connectivity Lab have demonstrated a conceptually new approach for detecting optical communication signals traveling through the air.

The team described the new technology, which could pave the way for fast optical wireless networks capable of delivering internet service to far-flung places, in Optica, The Optical Society’s journal for high impact research.

Bridging the Digital Divide

Continue reading “New detector overcomes key challenge in using light for wireless communications: With data rates of more than 2 gigabits per second, new approach in photodetection could simplify free-space optical communication” »

Jul 19, 2016

Baidu built an AI that composes music after looking at art

Posted by in categories: information science, media & arts, robotics/AI, transportation

When Art Inspires AI; AI composes music.


Who says AI is only for big data crunching and driverless car driving?

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Jul 19, 2016

Study shows continuous dehydration kills cells during dry preservation

Posted by in categories: cryonics, engineering, life extension

A new finding in experiments studying the dry preservation of living cells — a potentially revolutionary alternative to cryopreservation — has defined a clear limit where continuing dehydration kills cells. The data, combined with molecular dynamics simulations, provides insight into an important processing factor that has limited recent attempts at dry preservation.

“What we have done is identified what appears to be a materials constraint in our method of dry preservation. I think this new understanding suggests some interesting avenues to pursue in developing a successful process,” said Gloria Elliott, Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, one of the study’s authors.

The findings, reported in the July 8 issue of Scientific Reports, analyzes changes in the molecular arrangements of trehalose (a sugar) and water molecules during a typical dehydration process that they use to immobilize cells in a stable trehalose glass for long-term storage.

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Jul 19, 2016

Time to get a robot to do the selling

Posted by in categories: habitats, robotics/AI

Here’s a concept; you’re next open house showing is conducted by a robot.


UAE marketers get a first glimpse of the humanoid robot Pepper.

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Jul 19, 2016

Israeli Temporary Tattoos Read Emotions

Posted by in category: futurism

A temporary tattoo that can read your emotions. Could this be a new method used for events to id possible problem people. Of course, more work is needed and costs will need to improve; however, is this another tool to help id possible mass murderers, etc.?


The new Israeli-designed skin electrode, affixed to the skin just like a temporary tattoo, can monitor emotions and restore damaged tissue.

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Jul 19, 2016

Electron spin control: Levitated nanodiamond is research gem

Posted by in categories: nanotechnology, quantum physics

I’m telling folks there is much to be learn in the usage of natural and synthetic resources especially around diamonds — Nanodiamonds Magic.


WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Researchers have demonstrated how to control the “electron spin” of a nanodiamond while it is levitated with lasers in a vacuum, an advance that could find applications in quantum information processing, sensors and studies into the fundamental physics of quantum mechanics.

Electrons can be thought of as having two distinct spin states, “up” or “down.” The researchers were able to detect and control the electron spin resonance, or its change from one state to the other.

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Jul 19, 2016

World’s Smallest Hard Drive Writes Data Atom-By-Atom

Posted by in categories: computing, nanotechnology, particle physics

Meet the world’s smallest hard drive.


Dutch scientists have developed a unique solution to deal with the data storage problem. By manipulating single atoms, researchers have created the world’s smallest hard drive capable of storing 1 kilobyte of data (8000 bits) in a space under 100 nanometers across. The technology means that all the books in the world could be stored on a device the size of a postage stamp.

In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, scientists from the Technical University of Delft (TU Delft) said that they have created an atomic hard drive with a storage density that is 500 times greater than current hard drive technology.

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