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May 10, 2018

How Frightened Should We Be of A.I.?

Posted by in categories: existential risks, robotics/AI, transportation

Many people in tech point out that artificial narrow intelligence, or A.N.I., has grown ever safer and more reliable—certainly safer and more reliable than we are. (Self-driving cars and trucks might save hundreds of thousands of lives every year.) For them, the question is whether the risks of creating an omnicompetent Jeeves would exceed the combined risks of the myriad nightmares—pandemics, asteroid strikes, global nuclear war, etc.—that an A.G.I. could sweep aside for us.


Thinking about artificial intelligence can help clarify what makes us human—for better and for worse.

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May 10, 2018

Scientists Warn That Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano Could Erupt ‘Ballistic Rocks’

Posted by in category: futurism

The Two-Way The U.S. Geological Survey says that as magma in the volcano drops below the water table, it could create steam pressure and a sudden eruption that would spew toxic gas and “ballistic rocks.”

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May 10, 2018

Exoplanet without clouds is the first of its kind ever discovered

Posted by in categories: media & arts, space

You can hear “Milky Way Blues” for yourself on a new website devoted to turning real astronomy data into music.

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May 10, 2018

Series of quakes shake area near geothermal field in Northern California

Posted by in category: futurism

A magnitude 4.2 earthquake struck about 3 miles northwest of the Geysers geothermal field Wednesday evening and was followed by a series of aftershocks, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

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May 10, 2018

Listen to our rotating galaxy make strange music

Posted by in categories: media & arts, space

You can hear “Milky Way Blues” for yourself on a new website devoted to turning real astronomy data into music.

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May 9, 2018

How ‘Valleytronics’ Could Help Keep Moore’s Law Alive

Posted by in category: computing

To sustain the growth of the power of microchips and keep Moore’s Law going, semiconductor engineers are exploring the path of “valleytronics”.


Moore’s Law may be coming to an end due to the physical limitations of silicone and other elements, but a research team may have found a solution: valleytronics.

Continue reading “How ‘Valleytronics’ Could Help Keep Moore’s Law Alive” »

May 9, 2018

New Wearable Oral Sodium Sensor to Help Fight Hypertension

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, wearables

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology have built a flexible, wearable oral sodium sensor that could help monitor a person’s sodium intake.


A leading cause of hypertension is a person’s uncontrolled salt intake. This often results in high blood pressure and heart complications.

As a solution, the Georgia Institute of Technology researchers built the oral sodium sensor that could be easily worn in the mouth to monitor salt intake.

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May 9, 2018

Bloomberg & Billionaire Bull Novogratz Launch Cryptocurrency Price Index

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, cryptocurrencies, space

One of bitcoin’s biggest bulls has inked a deal with an unlikely partner to create a cryptocurrency price index.

Billionaire Mike Novogratz and Bloomberg LP on Wednesday announced that they are teaming up to launch the Bloomberg Galaxy Crypto Index (BGCI), which will track the aggregate performance of a basket of large-cap cryptocurrencies.

“Today’s launch of the Bloomberg Galaxy Crypto Index reflects our clients’ growing interest in cryptocurrencies,” said Alan Campbell, Global Product Manager for Bloomberg Indices. “The index brings our rigorous approach to index construction to cryptos and will provide investors with a transparent benchmark to gauge the performance of the broader market.”

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May 9, 2018

This Random Videogame Powers Quantum Entanglement Experiments

Posted by in categories: entertainment, quantum physics

How a simplistic keyboard-mashing game recruited thousands of players—for physics!

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May 9, 2018

Future anti-aging drugs could flip a “metabolic switch” to mimic fasting

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Fasting has been found to have a range of health benefits, and appears to slow down the aging process. Now, researchers from MIT have found that fasting for just 24 hours is enough to improve the regeneration of a person’s intestinal stem cells, which naturally declines with age. Better yet, with the metabolic switch identified, in the future the effect could be mimicked with a drug.

As with stem cells in all parts of the body, intestinal stem cells are in charge of growing new cells in the organ. They maintain the lining of the intestine, which is shed and replaced every few days, fight off infection and repair damage to the tissue. But as is usually the case, these stem cells get less and less effective at their job with age.

Previous research has found that caloric restriction, or continual fasting, has a profound effect on health and longevity. These effects have been seen in mice, rats, monkeys, lemurs, and other animals, and although human studies haven’t really been conducted, it seems that we could also benefit from harnessing the diet. So the MIT team set out to study the effects of fasting on intestinal stem cells.

Continue reading “Future anti-aging drugs could flip a ‘metabolic switch’ to mimic fasting” »