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Jun 24, 2016

Brain markers of numeric, verbal, and spatial reasoning abilities found

Posted by in categories: chemistry, health, neuroscience

A new study found that higher concentrations of NAA (N-acetyl aspartate) in two areas of the brain were associated with better performance on verbal and spatial tests. NAA is a byproduct of glucose metabolism and an indicator of brain health. (credit: Julie McMahon and Erick Paul)

A new study helps explain how brain structure and chemistry relate to “fluid intelligence” — the ability to adapt to new situations and solve problems one has never encountered before.

The study, reported in an open-access paper in the journal NeuroImage, observed two facets of fluid intelligence*:

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Jun 24, 2016

The Nuclear Spear: Casaba Howitzer

Posted by in category: military

When a nuclear technology has been kept classified since the 60s, you know that it is worth looking into. The Casaba Howitzer is one configuration for a nuclear shaped charge, that can concentrate the power of an atom bomb into a narrow cone.

In this post, we’ll look at its potential configurations, its advantages and limits, and how it can be applied to both propulsion and warfare.

Origins

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Jun 24, 2016

Star Trek Replicators Become Reality With NASA’s New 3D Printer/Recycler

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, futurism

NASA aims for a Star Trek future by transforming replicators into a real-world technology using a 3D printer/recycler! — B.J. Murphy for Serious Wonder.

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Jun 24, 2016

Is Cause & Effect Limited By The Speed Of Light?

Posted by in category: space

How fast can a cause make an effect? Is there a speed limit? How much of the universe can you influence with any given action?

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Jun 24, 2016

Gun Fusion: Two barrels to the stars

Posted by in categories: chemistry, nuclear energy, particle physics

To start a fusion reaction, you have to create extreme conditions. A combination of stellar temperatures, incredible pressures and lightning-quick energy dumps have all been tried to create these conditions, with varying degrees of success.

In this post, we’ll look at a low-cost, low-energy method of achieving nuclear fusion. It’s not Cold Fusion, it’s Gun Fusion.

Understanding what’s difficult

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Jun 24, 2016

Watch The Universe is-Expanding Faster Than the Laws of Physics Can give details, New Measurements Reveal

Posted by in categories: evolution, particle physics, space

Physicists in the US presently made the most precise measurement ever made of the present rate of growth of the Universe, but there is a problem: our Universe is expanding 8 percent quicker than our present laws of physics can give details. Currently astronomers are looking over once more at their measurements and if turn out to be right, this latest measurement will automatically force us to redefine how dark substance and dark energy have been manipulating the evolution of the Universe for the past 13.8 billion years, and that can’t be done without changing or addition something in the typical model of particle Physics.

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Jun 24, 2016

Dilemma over driverless cars as researchers put ‘sacrifice’ in spotlight

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, transportation

I am glad folks are listening. To get buy in for driverless autos will require proof and campaign showing the safety features of a driverless car over non-driverless. Along with this, auto makers will/ MUST prove that these cars cannot be breeched and controlled by hackers. Until we have safety proven and presented to the public like Volvo did in the late 80s; self driving cars will not be adopted broadly; it will be limited to metro cities in the US.

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Jun 24, 2016

A new form of hybrid photodetectors with quantum dots and graphene

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Glad to see others finding value in using Q-Dots with Graphene.


The development of photodetectors has been a matter of considerable interest in the past decades since their applications are essential to many different fields including cameras, medical devices, safety equipment, optical communication devices or even surveying instruments, among others.

Many efforts have been focused towards optoelectronic research in trying to create low cost photodetectors with high sensitivity, high quantum efficiency, high gain and fast photoresponse. This is of paramount importance especially in the short wave infrared which currently is addressed by very expensive III-V InGaAs photodetectors. The development of two main classes of photodetectors, photodiodes and phototransistors, have partially been able to accomplish these goals because even though they both have many outstanding properties, none seem to fulfill all of these requirements. While photodiodes are much faster than phototransistors, phototransistors have a higher gain and do not require low noise preamplifiers for their use.

To overcome these limitations, ICFO researchers Ivan Nikitskiy, Stijn Goossens, Dominik Kufer, Tania Lasanta, Gabriele Navickaite, led by ICREA professors at ICFO Frank Koppens and Gerasimos Konstantatos, have been able to develop a hybrid photodetector capable of attaining concomitantly better performance features in terms of speed, quantum efficiency and linear dynamic range, operating not only in the visible but also in the near infrared (NIR: 700-1400nm) and SWIR range (1400-3000nm). At the same time this technology is based upon materials that can be monolithically integrated with Si CMOS electronics as well as flexible electronic platforms. The results of this work have been recently published in Nature Communications.

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Jun 24, 2016

Russia’s Planning To Develop A Teleportation Device By 2035

Posted by in category: futurism

Good luck with that one Russia. Just to deadly for me.


To teleport from one place to another has, and still remains, one of the most sought-after technologies since it was first conceived in the writings of our greatest science fiction authors.

Few won’t have gawped at Star Trek’s transporter and while we’ve managed to conquer many of the technologies first outlined in the series this one has evaded us so far.

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Jun 24, 2016

These microbes can live on pure electricity

Posted by in categories: biological, particle physics, space

It may seem like something from science fiction, but researchers have found a group of microorganisms that can live off of pure electricity, reports. All life uses electricity, but scientists long thought it impossible for a cell to directly consume and expel electrons. That’s because fatty cell membranes act as insulators, preventing the flow of electricity. Scientists have now found evidence that some cells can discharge electrons through specialized proteins in their membranes, and others can ingest electrons from an electrode by using an enzyme that creates hydrogen atoms. Still others might be able to directly consume electrons, though that research has yet to be published. The findings could help researchers understand how life thrives under a variety of conditions, and how it could exist on places like Mars.

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