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Jul 18, 2016

New biomaterial developed for injectable neuronal control

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

In the campy 1966 science fiction movie “Fantastic Voyage,” scientists miniaturize a submarine with themselves inside and travel through the body of a colleague to break up a potentially fatal blood clot. Right. Micro-humans aside, imagine the inflammation that metal sub would cause.

Ideally, injectable or implantable medical devices should not only be small and electrically functional, they should be soft, like the body tissues with which they interact. Scientists from two UChicago labs set out to see if they could design a material with all three of those properties.

The material they came up with, published online June 27, 2016, in Nature Materials, forms the basis of an ingenious light-activated injectable device that could eventually be used to stimulate nerve cells and manipulate the behavior of muscles and organs.

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Jul 18, 2016

Fashion Technology 2016

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, wearables

Maybe time to create “Fashion’s Tech Golden Rules”.


Mistakes You Cannot Make.

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Jul 18, 2016

IBM Unveils New Cloud Blockchain Security Service

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, bitcoin, security

I like this article because I have for years looked at options to address the counterfeiting issues which is a extremely costly criminal industry around diamonds and artwork. As we have seen with synthetic diamonds in their use in QC and medical technology there is a lot that technology can do in addressing the counterfeiting issues as well as registration & certification space. Also, could registered & embedded serialized stones be another form of id for the consumer who wears their accessory with the stone? I believe it can be.


IBM launches a new high security blockchain service that uses hardware to protect valuable data, with provenance startup Everledger as its first customer.

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Jul 18, 2016

Columbia Engineering Researchers Use Acoustic Voxels to Embed Sound with Data

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, engineering, information science

Columbia Engineering Professor Changxi Zheng’s new approach could lead to better tagging and coding, leveraging 3D printing of complex geometries.

New York — July 18, 2016 — Columbia Engineering researchers, working with colleagues at Disney Research and MIT, have developed a new method to control sound waves, using a computational approach to inversely design acoustic filters that can fit within an arbitrary 3D shape while achieving target sound filtering properties. Led by Computer Science Professor Changxi Zheng, the team designed acoustic voxels, small, hollow, cube-shaped chambers through which sound enters and exits, as a modular system. Like Legos, the voxels can be connected to form an infinitely adjustable, complex structure. Because of their internal chambers, they can modify the acoustic filtering property of the structure—changing their number and size or how they connect alters the acoustic result.

“In the past, people have explored computational design of specific products, like a certain type of muffler or a particular shape of trumpet,” says Zheng, whose team is presenting their paper, “Acoustic Voxels: Computational Optimization of Modular Acoustic Filters,” at SIGGRAPH 2016 on July 27. “The general approach to manipulating sound waves has been to computationally design chamber shapes. Our algorithm enables new designs of noise mufflers, hearing aids, wind instruments, and more — we can now make them in any shape we want, even a 3D-printed toy hippopotamus that sounds like a trumpet.” VIDEO: http://www.cs.columbia.edu/cg/lego/

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Jul 18, 2016

Brain-data gold mine could reveal how neurons compute

Posted by in categories: computing, genetics, neuroscience

Inspired by the large-scale sky surveys with which astronomers explore the cosmos, neuroscientists in Seattle, Washington, have spent four years systematically surveying the neural activity of the mouse visual cortex. The Allen Brain Observatory’s first data release, on 13 July, provides a publicly accessible data set of unprecedented size and scope, designed to help scientists to model and understand the human brain.

The project is part of an ambitious ten-year brain-research plan announced in 2012 by the Allen Institute for Brain Science. Designed to catalogue neurons and their electrical characteristics in minute detail, the initiative aims to enable new insights into how perception and cognition arise.

To compile the brain observatory’s first data set, researchers used a specialized microscope to record calcium waves that occur when neurons fire, sampling activity in 25 mice over 360 experimental sessions, while the animals viewed a battery of visual stimuli such as moving patterns of lines, images of natural scenes and short movies. The data set so far includes 18,000 cells in 4 areas of the visual cortex, making it one of the largest and most comprehensive of its kind. The set also includes information about each neuron’s location and its expression of certain genetic markers. At 30 terabytes, the raw data are too large to share easily, but users can download a more manageable processed data set, or explore it online.

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Jul 18, 2016

‘Who are you wearing?’ gets literal with DNA-based fashion

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, privacy

This will definitely make designer wear fashion very collectable and easier for investigators and consumer to detect fakes due to biometric readers. Unfortunately, Coco Chanel and Gianni Versace are not around to participate.


Designer Tina Gorjanc is using Alexander McQueen’s DNA to grow “skin” complete with freckles and tattoos that will be tanned to create jackets and bags.

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Jul 18, 2016

Gas sensors ‘see’ through soil to analyze microbial interactions

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, law

Can serve many uses such as geneology, etc. However, the bigger advancement will be with criminal/ legal investigations.


Rice University researchers have developed gas biosensors to “see” into soil and allow them to follow the behavior of the microbial communities within.

In a study in the American Chemical Society’s journal Environmental Science and Technology, the Rice team described using genetically engineered bacteria that release methyl halide gases to monitor microbial gene expression in samples in the lab.

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Jul 18, 2016

Researcher builds technology to control drone swarms with his mind

Posted by in categories: computing, drones, neuroscience, robotics/AI, security

About 5 years ago a friend of mine at Microsoft (Mitch S.) had a vision of making a new security model around drone swarms and a form of BMI technology. Glad to see the vision come true.


Scientists have discovered how to control multiple robotic drones using the human brain, an advance that can help develop swarms of search and rescue drones that are controlled just by thought.

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Jul 18, 2016

Abbasi J. National Academies Hit the Brakes on Gene Drive–Modified Organisms. JAMA. Published online July 13, 2016. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.8830

Posted by in category: genetics

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Jul 18, 2016

Profusa to Showcase Tissue-integrated Sensors for Long-term Continuous Monitoring of Body Chemistry at the Pioneers Festival in Vienna

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, chemistry, health, mobile phones

Lumee™ tissue-O2 monitoring system slated to be available this year in Europe

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., May 16, 2016 — Profusa, Inc. announced today that it was selected by Pioneers, the global business relationship builder, to showcase the company’s “wear-and-forget” Lumee™ biosensor technology at the Pioneers Festival held at the prestigious Hofburg Imperial Palace in Vienna, Austria, May 24th-25th.

Making health and disease monitoring as easy as turning on your smart phone, the company’s tissue-integrated sensors for long-term, continuous tracking of body chemistry will be highlighted by Ben Hwang, Profusa’s chairman and chief executive officer, in a talk entitled, “Beyond Fitness Trackers: Let Your Body Speak.”

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