Menu

Blog

Page 3504

Dec 18, 2016

A New Kind of Computer Chip: Silicon May Be Replaced by New Material

Posted by in categories: computing, materials

At the forefront of computing technology for decades, silicon-based chips’ reign may soon end, as today’s chip designers are looking for other materials that offer more options and more amazing abilities than the silicon we all know and love.

This new trend has spurred the guys at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop what could be the foundation for multi-role computer chips.

Continue reading “A New Kind of Computer Chip: Silicon May Be Replaced by New Material” »

Dec 17, 2016

Real-life tricorders are about to start consumer testing

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Remember the Automotive X Prize? There’s one for tricorders, too, and finalists have just started consumer testing. Coming soon to a sick bay near you.

Read more

Dec 17, 2016

The disturbingly accurate brain science that identifies potential criminals while they’re still toddlers

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, health, neuroscience, science

Scientists are able to use brain tests on three-year-olds to determine which children are more likely to grow up to become criminals. It sounds like Minority Report come to life: An uncomfortable idea presenting myriad ethical concerns. But, though unnerving, the research is nuanced and could potentially be put to good use.

In the study, published in Nature Human Behavior this week, researchers led by neuroscientists at Duke University showed that those with the lowest 20% brain health results aged three went on to commit more than 80% of crimes as adults. The research used data from a New Zealand longitudinal study of more than 1,000 people from birth in the early 1970s until they reached 38 years old. This distribution, of 20% of a population accounting for 80% of an effect, is strong but not unusual. In fact, it follows the “Pareto principle.” The authors write in their paper:

In Pareto’s day, the problem definition was that 20% of families owned 80% of land in Italy. The so-called Pareto principle is alive and useful today: for example, in software engineering, 20% of the code is said to contain 80% of the errors.

Continue reading “The disturbingly accurate brain science that identifies potential criminals while they’re still toddlers” »

Dec 17, 2016

Can we engineer the end of ageing?

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, life extension

Biologist Daisy Robinton talks about engineering aging and the possibilities new technology offers.


Harvard University biologist Daisy Robinton reveals how science is helping us understand how and why we age.

Continue reading “Can we engineer the end of ageing?” »

Dec 17, 2016

Headphones that Listen

Posted by in categories: media & arts, mobile phones

Tune In, Take Control.

With OV, your day becomes more productive, enjoyable, and just a whole lot easier. Use your voice to play a song, order groceries and check the news. Switch seamlessly between the best music and calls, voice commands and real world conversations, without missing a beat and without touching your phone.

Read more

Dec 17, 2016

Only 1 300 out of about 6 000 satellites launched since the beginning of the space age are operational

Posted by in category: satellites

The D3 project, funded by the EU, is developing a decommissioning device, to be installed on the satellite prior to launch, that removes old satellites when they reach the end of their missions or their lives or when a major failure occurs.

#investEU #SMEs #SMEinstrument #space

Read more

Dec 17, 2016

Aging Is Reversible–at Least in Human Cells and Live Mice

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Changes to gene activity that occur with age can be turned back, a new study shows.

Read more

Dec 17, 2016

New BMW motorcycle

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, transportation

Click on photo to start video.

BMW revealed a motorcycle so artificially intelligent that you can ride it without a helmet.

Continue reading “New BMW motorcycle” »

Dec 17, 2016

Genetically Engineered Bacteria Will Be Our Martian Architects

Posted by in categories: genetics, space

And it will change how we think about construction here on Earth.

Read more

Dec 17, 2016

Nano Dimension’s DragonFly 2020 3D Printer Takes Flight at CES 2017

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, electronics

NESS ZIONA, Israel, December 12, 2016 – Nano Dimension Ltd., a leader in the field of 3D Printed Electronics (NASDAQ, TASE: NNDM), will showcase its 3D printer for professional printed circuit boards (PCBs) and electric circuits in Eureka Park during CES 2017. The technology sits firmly at the intersection of 3D printing and printed electronics, and sets new standards for accuracy, complexity and multi-materiality in the fields of 3D printing and electronics prototyping.

Read more