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Apr 14, 2024

Success requires ‘ample doses of pain,’ billionaire Nvidia CEO tells Stanford students: ‘I hope suffering happens to you’

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

When it comes to achieving success, Huang knows more than most. In 1993, he co-founded computer chip company Nvidia, where he’s served as CEO for more than three decades. The company’s success turned Huang into a billionaire. Now, with Nvidia’s chips in high demand for building AI software, it’s become one of the world’s most valuable companies with a valuation north of $2 trillion.

Huang himself is one of the world’s wealthiest individuals, with an estimated net worth of $77.6 billion, according to Bloomberg.

Continue reading “Success requires ‘ample doses of pain,’ billionaire Nvidia CEO tells Stanford students: ‘I hope suffering happens to you’” »

Apr 14, 2024

This Tiny Frog Emits a Powerful Ultrasonic Scream No Human Can Hear

Posted by in category: futurism

The Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest is filled with the ear-piercing ‘screams’ of a tiny amphibian in distress, but until now, we humans have been oblivious to their cries.

For the first time, researchers have recorded South American frogs crying out at a frequency that totally bypasses the human ear – but which would be quite unpleasant to animals with the right kind of receivers.

The leaf litter frog (Haddadus binotatus) is the most abundant species of frog in the forest community. Though abundant, they’re tiny – the largest of the species are females, and even they that barely reach 64 millimeters (2.5 inches) in length.

Apr 14, 2024

Semiconductor quantum dots: Technological progress and future challenges

Posted by in categories: chemistry, energy, quantum physics

Quantum #dots feature widely tunable and distinctive optical, electrical, chemical, and physical properties. They span energy #harvesting, #ILLUMINATION, #displays, #cameras, and more.

Read more on #WorldQuantumDay: #Sciencereview.

Semiconductor quantum dots: Technological progress and future challenges.

Apr 14, 2024

FSD Stories

Posted by in category: futurism

Explore the fun and excitement that comes with Tesla FSD We have curated Tesla FSD test drives, stories, and shorts into a map layout so you can explore how people are trying the Tesla FSD and the reactions they are getting. For best results expand the map to full screen and select from these options.

FSD drives: 66 stories: 14 shorts: 6

If you want to add your FSD adventure video, send us an email to: [email protected] Include the youtube video url, and any comments you want to share smile

Apr 14, 2024

After Being Resuscitated, Cardiac Arrest Patients Tell What Dying Was Like

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

What do people see when they die? New research finds what people can recall after surviving a cardiac arrest.

Apr 14, 2024

FULLTEXT01 (6).pdf

Posted by in category: drones

Intelligent drone swarms.


Shared with Dropbox.

Apr 14, 2024

Intelligent drone swarm navigation and multi tracking in the 3D environments

Posted by in category: drones

Shared with Dropbox.

Apr 14, 2024

Viropath and depopulation and the fermi paradox

Posted by in category: existential risks

Shared with Dropbox.

Apr 14, 2024

The Quest to Map the Inside of the Proton

Posted by in category: particle physics

Long-anticipated experiments that use light to mimic gravity are revealing the distribution of energies, forces, and pressures inside a subatomic particle for the first time.

Apr 14, 2024

Nothing is everything: How hidden emptiness can define the usefulness of filtration materials

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, mathematics, nanotechnology

Voids, or empty spaces, exist within matter at all scales, from the astronomical to the microscopic. In a new study, researchers used high-powered microscopy and mathematical theory to unveil nanoscale voids in three dimensions. This advancement is poised to improve the performance of many materials used in the home and in the chemical, energy and medical industries—particularly in the area of filtration.

Magnification of common filters used in the home shows that, while they look like a solid piece of material with uniform holes, they are actually composed of millions of randomly oriented tiny voids that allow small particles to pass through. In some industrial applications, like water and solvent filtration, paper-thin membranes make up the barriers that separate fluids and particles.

“The materials science community has been aware of these randomly oriented nanoscale voids within filter membranes for a while,” said Falon Kalutantirige, a University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign graduate student.

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