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Nov 3, 2015

Professionals, your time is up, prepare to be sidelined

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, law, robotics/AI

A new book, The Future of the Professions, argues that machines will soon do the work of lawyers, doctors, and others. Should babies be delivered by robots?

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Nov 3, 2015

World’s Largest Nuclear Fusion Reactor

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, supercomputing

This is the world’s largest nuclear fusion reactor launching this month in Germany. And it was designed by a supercomputer…

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Nov 3, 2015

Skype founders invent self-driving robot that can deliver groceries for £1

Posted by in categories: business, internet, robotics/AI, transportation

The local delivery market is worth approximately £150bn in the UK alone. This includes parcel and delivery companies (20 pc) and personal shopping trips by people (80 pc). Starship said that robot deliveries are potentially five to fifteen times cheaper than current “human-powered” delivery services.

“It does not take the whole delivery chain from an Amazon warehouse to your doorstep, it only takes the last few miles. But right now the last few miles are the most difficult part for the delivery vans. They need to find parking spaces and so forth, so our robot is taking care of that,” said Mr Heinla.

“For the large e-commerce companies it helps to reduce the costs. For the local businesses it opens up new possibilities, allowing people to order deliveries over the internet rather than coming to the store physically.”

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Nov 2, 2015

The Active Sun: US Unveils Plan to Deal with Space Weather

Posted by in categories: energy, space

The U.S. government is getting more serious about dealing with the dangers posed by powerful sun storms.

On Thursday (Oct. 29), the White House released two documents that together lay out the nation’s official plan for mitigating the negative impacts of solar flares and other types of “space weather,” which have the potential to wreak havoc on power grids and other key infrastructure here on Earth.

The new “National Space Weather Strategy” outlines the basic framework the federal government will pursue to better understand, predict and recover from space-weather events, while the “National Space Weather Action Plan” details specific activities intended to help achieve this broad goal. [The Sun’s Wrath: Worst Solar Storms in History].

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Nov 2, 2015

In a new round of testing, NASA confirms yet again that the ‘impossible’ EMdrive thruster works

Posted by in categories: physics, space travel

Engineer Roger Shawyer’s controversial EM Drive thruster jets back into relevancy this week, as a team of researchers at NASA’s Eagleworks Laboratories recently completed yet another round of testing on the seemingly impossible tech. Though no official peer-reviewed lab paper has been published yet, and NASA institutes strict press release restrictions on the Eagleworks lab these days, engineer Paul March took to the NASA Spaceflight forum to explain the group’s findings. In essence, by utilizing an improved experimental procedure, the team managed to mitigate some of the errors from prior tests — yet still found signals of unexplained thrust.

Isaac Newton should be sweating.

Flying in the face of traditional laws of physics, the EM Drive makes use of a magnetron and microwaves to create a propellantless propulsion system. By pushing microwaves into a closed, truncated cone and back towards the small end of said cone, the drive creates the momentum and force necessary to propel a craft forward. Because the system is a reactionless drive, it goes against humankind’s fundamental comprehension of physics, hence its controversial nature.

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Nov 2, 2015

Mauna a Wakea: Hawai’i’s sacred mountain and the contentious Thirty Meter Telescope | The Conversation

Posted by in categories: astronomy, science, space

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“Should astronomers be allowed to build the TMT on Mauna Kea? This question raises concerns that we, as practising astronomers, see as a reoccurring issue within the scientific community.”

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Nov 2, 2015

New Electronic Skin Can Sense Sound and Temperature

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, materials

South Korean scientists develop an electronic skin that uses a layer of graphene film to detect sound and temperature.

A team led by materials scientist at the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea has developed rubbery plastic-and-graphene film that mimics the structure of human skin. The team claims that the film can accurately detect texture, temperature, pressure and sound. This marks the first time that an electronic skin has been able to demonstrate the ability to sense the entire spectrum of stimuli, and the team is hopeful that this technology can create practical artificial skin.

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Nov 2, 2015

These Are the Genes Linked to Aging

Posted by in category: life extension

I am in my mid 40’s. Hurry the fuck up.


In the most complete tally yet, scientists have identified nearly 1,500 genes that are connected to how we age.

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Nov 2, 2015

NASA Eagleworks has tested an upgraded Emdrive

Posted by in category: space travel

Paul March says Eagleworks has mitigated the issues raised by our Eaglework (EW)Lab’s Blue-Ribbon PhD panel and now Potomac-Neuron’s paper, on the possible Lorentz force interactions.

The issue was raised that there could be Lorentz Interactions with the dc currents on the EW torque pendulum (TP) with the stray magnetic fields from the torque pendulum’s first generation open-face magnetic damper and the Earth’s geomagnetic field.

EW built and installed a 2nd generation, closed face magnetic damper that reduced the stray magnetic fields in the vacuum chamber by at least an order of magnitude and any Lorentz force interactions it could produce.

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Nov 2, 2015

Cryonics Is No Fantasy, Should We Be Taking It Seriously?

Posted by in categories: cryonics, life extension, materials, neuroscience

Most science starts off at the fringe and slowly makes it way to the mainstream. Cryopreservation is commonly achieved in a laboratory setting, but for many years serious applications remained confined to science fiction. Is it time to change how we see cryonics?

The science of freezing things

Scientific research requires great storage, and huge amounts of material including cells are frozen every day to be used at the later date. If you follow the correct protocols, many forms of life can be re-awakened after their cryogenic sleep. DMSO, propylene glycol and glycerol help abolish problems like ice crystals which can rupture cells, and storage temperatures can drop to below −120 °C. At these levels biological reactions are essentially halted.

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