Menu

Blog

Page 10717

Aug 18, 2015

Blockchain for IoT? Yes!

Posted by in categories: automation, big data, complex systems, computing, disruptive technology, engineering, hardware, science, supercomputing

Quoted: “Sometimes decentralization makes sense.

Filament is a startup that is taking two of the most overhyped ideas in the tech community—the block chain and the Internet of things—and applying them to the most boring problems the world has ever seen. Gathering data from farms, mines, oil platforms and other remote or highly secure places.

The combination could prove to be a powerful one because monitoring remote assets like oil wells or mining equipment is expensive whether you are using people driving around to manually check gear or trying to use sensitive electronic equipment and a pricey a satellite internet connection.

Instead Filament has built a rugged sensor package that it calls a Tap, and technology network that is the real secret sauce of the operation that allows its sensors to conduct business even when they aren’t actually connected to the internet. The company has attracted an array of investors who have put $5 million into the company, a graduate of the Techstars program. Bullpen Capital led the round with Verizon Ventures, Crosslink Capital, Samsung Ventures, Digital Currency Group, Haystack, Working Lab Capital, Techstars and others participating.

Continue reading “Blockchain for IoT? Yes!” »

Aug 18, 2015

Graphene Just The Tip Of The 2D Materials Iceberg For Clean Technology

Posted by in category: materials

Graphene is not the only game in town.


Two new developments show that the race is on to replace silicon as the go-to semiconductor of choice with other 2D materials if not graphene.

Read more

Aug 18, 2015

How (and Why) SpaceX Will Colonize Mars

Posted by in category: space

One of life’s great leaps may be just around the corner.

Read more

Aug 18, 2015

What Is Synthetic Biology?

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, evolution

Synthetic biology is radical and has huge potential to revolutionize multiple industries. The fact is biology has already worked out efficient ways of doing things, or has in place mechanisms we can adapt, so why reinvent anything if we can simply adapt what’s already here? Using billions of years of evolution makes logical sense, and that’s what synthetic biology builds on.

So here is a great video by Grist, explaining what synthetic biology is and what we might be able to do with it in the future.

Read more

Aug 18, 2015

Going solid-state could make batteries safer and longer-lasting

Posted by in categories: energy, transportation

If you pry open one of today’s ubiquitous high-tech devices—whether a cellphone, a laptop, or an electric car—you’ll find that batteries take up most of the space inside. Indeed, the recent evolution of batteries has made it possible to pack ample power in small places.

But people still always want their devices to last even longer, or go further on a charge, so researchers work night and day to boost the power a given size can hold. Rare, but widely publicized, incidents of overheating or combustion in lithium-ion batteries have also highlighted the importance of safety in battery technology.

Now researchers at MIT and Samsung, and in California and Maryland, have developed a new approach to one of the three basic components of batteries, the . The new findings are based on the idea that a solid electrolyte, rather than the liquid used in today’s most common rechargeables, could greatly improve both device lifetime and safety—while providing a significant boost in the amount of power stored in a given space.

Read more

Aug 18, 2015

Android Marshmallow is the name of Google’s next operating system update

Posted by in categories: computing, mobile phones

Android M becomes Android Marshmellow.

Read more

Aug 18, 2015

Google’s Human-Shaped Robot Takes First Walk Outside

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

https://youtube.com/watch?v=NwrjAa1SgjQ

Also, meet a robot dog with an arm for a neck.

Read more

Aug 18, 2015

At Last, a Wearable You Will Want to Wear — By Chander Chawla | Forbes

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, business, innovation, materials, media & arts, robotics/AI, wearables

IMG_0424

“I am excited to introduce the first wave of TechLuxe in a form of a resin handbag with an LCD video screen. The idea is to radically bring technology to fashion, but with creative beauty within a functional beautifully designed bag.”

Read more

Aug 17, 2015

Watch Boston Dynamics’ Robot Run Outside Oh God They’re Coming For Us

Posted by in categories: neuroscience, robotics/AI, singularity

Possible cause of the singularity Boston Dynamics is secretive about upcoming projects, but new footage shows their robots in action—and the results are highly unsettling.

First you can see Spot, an agile autonomous quadruped ripped directly from Isaac Asimov’s nightmares, opening a door with the arm it sports instead of a face. Spot would almost be adorable the way it trots around on four legs except for the protruding face-arm that will turn the handle on your front door with its superstrength. Sleep well tonight.

Read more

Aug 17, 2015

Watch a Boston Dynamics humanoid robot wander around outside

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

https://youtube.com/watch?v=NwrjAa1SgjQ

August 17, 2015 Boston Dynamics, which Google bought in 2013, has begun testing one of its humanoid robots — those that are designed to function like humans — out in the wild. Marc Raibert, the founder of Boston Dynamics, talked about the research and showed footage of the project during a talk on Aug. 3 at the 11th Fab Lab Conference and Symposium in Cambridge, Mass.

“Out in the world is just a totally different challenge than in the lab,” Raibert said at the conference, which was organized by the Fab Foundation, a division of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Center for Bits and Atoms. “You can’t predict what it’s going to be like.”

Boston Dynamics has tested its LS3 quadruped (four-legged) robot out in natural settings in the past. But humanoid robots are different — they can be much taller and have a higher center of gravity. Keeping them moving on paved asphalt is one thing, but maneuvering them through rugged terrain, which is what Boston Dynamics’ Atlas robots dealt with recently during the DARPA Robotics Challenge, can be trickier.

Read more