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Sep 21, 2015

Sand-based batteries could soon power your mobile phone

Posted by in categories: energy, materials, mobile phones

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside in the US have developed lithium-ion batteries that substitute graphite with silicon extracted from sand and last three times longer than current products.

The negative side of lithium-ion batteries, or anode, is made with graphite, and scientists have been trying to find a substitute material that could make batteries last longer. One of the options is silicon, which can store up to 10 times more energy than current materials, but it’s expensive and hard to produce in large quantities.

But then a very simple but brilliant option revealed itself to graduate student Zachary Favors. As Gizmag reports, Favors was relaxing after surfing when he noticed something quite special: sand. Sand is made of quartz, or silicon dioxide, and other materials, so Favors thought he could extract the silicon and use it to make batteries.

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Sep 20, 2015

What Happens When Kids Try Dial-Up Internet For The First Time

Posted by in category: internet

Remember dial-up internet and your mum bollocking you to get off so she could use the phone? These kids don’t… Until now, the struggle of all that beeping and churning during the five minutes it it took to connect has been lost on them.

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Sep 20, 2015

Snowden says aliens could be trying to get in touch right now

Posted by in categories: alien life, encryption

Technically Incorrect: In a conversation with Neil DeGrasse Tyson, the Moscow-based NSA whistleblower offers his views on interplanetary communication. He fears their communication may be encrypted, so we’re missing it.

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Sep 20, 2015

The Search for Extraterrestrial Life and Encrypted Space Communication

Posted by in categories: alien life, encryption, existential risks, information science


Neil deGrasse Tyson and Edward Snowden recently discussed the idea that encryption mechanisms with advanced extraterrestrial species and humans could theoretically render communication as indistinguishable from cosmic background radiation. With only a short period of time in a species growth where open communication is broadcast to the stars (through the sluggish and primitive nature of radio broadcasts), this could prevent us (or other species) from making contact with one another.

With the Drake Equation stating a high probability of communicative extraterrestrial civilizations and the contrasting Fermi Paradox citing lacking evidence of such, it begs the question of whether outlying reasons have an impact. In my opinion, the Drake Equation rings true in the sense that hundreds of billions of stars exist in our galaxy alone (many with their own diverse planetary bodies), setting the stage for extraterrestrial life to disavow itself as insatiable ramblings. Unlike that which is eminent in the Fermi Paradox, I believe, in this case, a conclusion based off of inductive reasoning seems to hold more water than an evidence-only approach.

Keeping in mind the discussion in The Guardian article, a flaw of the Fermi Paradox’s evidence-based perspective should become apparent: secure, encrypted communication (cloaked by design) would render the existence of extraterrestrial intelligence invisible to the prying ear. If intentional, there could be many reasons for withholding this whereabouts of a species location. An abstract theory from science fiction may itself hold a degree of truth. An example of which, is the video game series ‘Mass Effect,’ where an advanced, sentient machine-race cleanse the galaxy of advanced life every 40,000 years. The reasoning for doing so is to “bring order to chaos” and for reasons “unfathomable.” Be it for an abstract reason such as this or simply for secure communication, the encryption of the resultant transmission’s presence wouldn’t register as noticeable to any observers. As nearly all signs of outside life would be mute, it then lays in the other senses that hold the most promise of enlightenment.

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Sep 20, 2015

For more innovative ideas, visit our website at

Posted by in categories: energy, engineering

http://www.engineeringbuddies.com/channels/innovative-ideas/

The Engineering Buddies Team
www.EngineeringBuddies.com

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Sep 20, 2015

5D optical memory in glass could record the last evidence of civilization

Posted by in category: nanotechnology

Using nanostructured glass, scientists at the University of Southampton have, for the first time, experimentally demonstrated the recording and retrieval processes of five dimensional digital data by femtosecond laser writing. The storage allows unprecedented parameters including 360 TB/disc data capacity, thermal stability up to 1000°C and practically unlimited lifetime.

Coined as the ‘Superman’ memory crystal, as the memory has been compared to the “memory crystals” used in the Superman films, the data is recorded via self-assembled nanostructures created in fused quartz, which is able to store vast quantities of data for over a million years. The information encoding is realised in five dimensions: the size and orientation in addition to the three dimensional position of these nanostructures.

A 300 kb digital copy of a text file was successfully recorded in 5D using ultrafast laser, producing extremely short and of light. The file is written in three layers of nanostructured dots separated by five micrometres.

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Sep 20, 2015

‘Tree of life’ for 2.3 million species released

Posted by in category: futurism

Version 1.0, Tree of Life.

“Tens of thousands of smaller trees have been published over the years for select branches of the tree of life—some containing upwards of 100,000 species—but this is the first time those results have been combined into a single tree that encompasses all of life.”


A first draft of the “tree of life” for the roughly 2.3 million named species of animals, plants, fungi and microbes—from platypuses to puffballs—has been released.

Continue reading “‘Tree of life’ for 2.3 million species released” »

Sep 20, 2015

Ghost in the Shell: Innocence — Opening

Posted by in category: futurism

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S_1PssU1a9U&feature=youtu.be

One of the most awesome openings ever made.

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Sep 20, 2015

This is the Best Footage Yet of an Exoplanet Orbiting its Star

Posted by in category: space

And…it’s literally six seconds of pixelated blob. But before you laugh, know this: Capturing that planetary transit you just witnessed was no easy task.

You’re looking at Beta Pictoris b, a gas giant ten to twelve times the mass of Jupiter that orbits a star over 60 light years away. That’s 3.527 × 1014 miles from us, and we’re actually able to see it! If you’re still not impressed, try this on for size: Beta Pictoris b is roughly a million times dimmer than its parent star.

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Sep 20, 2015

Intel and Toshiba Make 3D SSD With 10TB Capacity at Lower Prices

Posted by in categories: computing, electronics

The BiCS uses 48-layer stacking process that improves reliability and speed. Toshiba was the company that invented flash memory and has the 15nm NAND cells which are the smallest in the world.

Right now company is gearing up for its mass production and giving out samples to the companies.

Continue reading “Intel and Toshiba Make 3D SSD With 10TB Capacity at Lower Prices” »