Menu

Blog

Page 10102

Feb 8, 2016

Emergent Chip Vastly Accelerates Deep Neural Networks

Posted by in categories: computing, economics, neuroscience, robotics/AI

Stanford University PhD candidate, Song Han, who works under advisor and networking pioneer, Dr. Bill Dally, responded in a most soft-spoken and thoughtful way to the question of whether the coupled software and hardware architecture he developed might change the world.

In fact, instead of answering the question directly, he pointed to the range of applications, both in the present and future, that will be driven by near real-time inference for complex deep neural networks—all a roundabout way of showing not just why what he is working toward is revolutionary, but why the missing pieces he is filling in have kept neural network-fed services at a relative constant.

There is one large barrier to that future Han considers imminent—one pushed by an existing range of neural network-driven applications powering all aspects of the consumer economy and, over time, the enterprise. And it’s less broadly technical than it is efficiency-driven. After all, considering the mode of service delivery of these applications, often lightweight, power-aware devices, how much computation can be effectively packed into the memory of such devices—and at what cost to battery life or overall power? Devices aside, these same concerns, at a grander level of scale, are even more pertinent at the datacenter where some bulk of the inference is handled.

Read more

Feb 8, 2016

Drawing Robot

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

Meet Otto, the robot that draws.

Read more

Feb 8, 2016

Elon Musk explains how a Hyperloop would work on Mars

Posted by in categories: Elon Musk, space, transportation

It’s easier than on earth!

Read more

Feb 8, 2016

Jason Silva

Posted by in category: futurism

“If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is, Infinite.” — William Blake.

Read more

Feb 8, 2016

Autonomous Cars: Here’s a Look at Some of the Top Models

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, transportation

Autonomous cars have finally arrived, and they’re pretty remarkable. Here’s a look at the best on the line.

Read more

Feb 8, 2016

Now, Scientists Can Suture Wounds with Lasers

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, futurism

A new method of closing wounds has been discovered by researchers from University of St. Andrews and Harvard Medical School.

In the future, your wounds might not be closed by stitches or staples. Instead, they will be fixed with lasers.

Continue reading “Now, Scientists Can Suture Wounds with Lasers” »

Feb 8, 2016

Here’s What NASA Thinks Our Martian Homes Will Look Like

Posted by in categories: habitats, space

The Red Planet is a hostile, barren world. So if we’re going to live there, we’re going to need to develop a new kind of home.

Read more

Feb 8, 2016

New algorithm improves speed and accuracy of pedestrian detection

Posted by in categories: computing, information science, neuroscience, robotics/AI, transportation

What if computers could recognize objects as well as the human brain could? Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego have taken an important step toward that goal by developing a pedestrian detection system that performs in near real-time (2−4 frames per second) and with higher accuracy (close to half the error) compared to existing systems. The technology, which incorporates deep learning models, could be used in “smart” vehicles, robotics and image and video search systems.

Read more

Feb 8, 2016

The Road To The Singularity

Posted by in categories: Peter Diamandis, singularity

Will we witness the era of The #Singularity? Futurist Jason Silva joins #technologists and #innovation pioneers Peter H. Diamandis, Rick Smolan, and other experts, as they discuss the radical transformation underway. http://bit.ly/1XdzFL4

Read more

Feb 8, 2016

Quantum Levitation

Posted by in categories: materials, quantum physics, transportation

Researchers at the school of physics and astronomy at Tel Aviv University have created a track around which a superconductor (a material that is extremely efficient at transmitting electricity) can float, thanks to the phenomenon of “quantum levitation “.

This levitation effect is explained by the Meissner effect, which describes how, when a material makes the transition from its normal to its superconducting state, it actively excludes magnetic fields from its interior, leaving only a thin layer on its surface.

When a material is in its superconducting state — which involves very low temperatures — it is strongly diamagnetic. This means that when a magnetic field is externally applied, it will create an equally opposing magnetic field, locking it in place.

Continue reading “Quantum Levitation” »