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Archive for the ‘supercomputing’ category

Nov 18, 2020

‘We can solve this problem in an amount of time that no number of GPUs or CPUs can achieve,’ startup Cerebras tells supercomputing conference

Posted by in category: supercomputing

Startup Cerebras benchmarked its pint-sized computer against 16,000 Xeon cores in the DoE’s Joule supercomputer on a problem of computational fluid dynamics.

Nov 17, 2020

Researcher sets record for quantum chemistry calculation

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, food, information science, quantum physics, supercomputing

A researcher from The Australian National University (ANU) has used one of the most powerful supercomputers in the world to predict the quantum mechanical properties of large molecular systems with an accuracy that surpasses all previous experiments.

Calculations of this type have the potential to solve important problems in , fuel production, water purification, and the manufacturing of medicines, foods, textiles, and consumer goods.

By running his on the Summit supercomputer at the Oak Ridge National Lab in the U.S., Dr. Giuseppe Barca has broken the for the largest Hartree-Fock ever performed, setting new standards in High-Performance Computing.

Nov 13, 2020

Quantum internet: the next global network is already being laid

Posted by in categories: internet, quantum physics, supercomputing

Harun Šiljak, Trinity College Dublin

Google reported a remarkable breakthrough towards the end of 2019. The company claimed to have achieved something called quantum supremacy, using a new type of “quantum” computer to perform a benchmark test in 200 seconds. This was in stark contrast to the 10,000 years that would supposedly have been needed by a state-of-the-art conventional supercomputer to complete the same test.

Despite IBM’s claim that its supercomputer, with a little optimisation, could solve the task in a matter of days, Google’s announcement made it clear that we are entering a new era of incredible computational power.

Continue reading “Quantum internet: the next global network is already being laid” »

Nov 6, 2020

Will Quantum Computing Supercharge Artificial Intelligence?

Posted by in categories: government, mobile phones, quantum physics, robotics/AI, supercomputing

Another argument for government to bring AI into its quantum computing program is the fact that the United States is a world leader in the development of computer intelligence. Congress is close to passing the AI in Government Act, which would encourage all federal agencies to identify areas where artificial intelligences could be deployed. And government partners like Google are making some amazing strides in AI, even creating a computer intelligence that can easily pass a Turing test over the phone by seeming like a normal human, no matter who it’s talking with. It would probably be relatively easy for Google to merge some of its AI development with its quantum efforts.

The other aspect that makes merging quantum computing with AI so interesting is that the AI could probably help to reduce some of the so-called noise of the quantum results. I’ve always said that the way forward for quantum computing right now is by pairing a quantum machine with a traditional supercomputer. The quantum computer could return results like it always does, with the correct outcome muddled in with a lot of wrong answers, and then humans would program a traditional supercomputer to help eliminate the erroneous results. The problem with that approach is that it’s fairly labor intensive, and you still have the bottleneck of having to run results through a normal computing infrastructure. It would be a lot faster than giving the entire problem to the supercomputer because you are only fact-checking a limited number of results paired down by the quantum machine, but it would still have to work on each of them one at a time.

Continue reading “Will Quantum Computing Supercharge Artificial Intelligence?” »

Oct 30, 2020

How Graphene Could Help Us Build Bigger and Better Quantum Computers

Posted by in categories: quantum physics, supercomputing

Quantum computers can solve problems in seconds that would take “ordinary” computers millennia, but their sensitivity to interference is majorly holding them back. Now, researchers claim they’ve created a component that drastically cuts down on error-inducing noise.
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Quantum computers use quantum bits, or qubits, which can represent a one, a zero, or any combination of the two simultaneously. This is thanks to the quantum phenomenon known as superposition.

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Oct 24, 2020

IBM releases Watson supercomputer yottabyte storage into the market

Posted by in categories: information science, supercomputing

Circa 2014 o,.o.


IBM has started to flex its muscles with the Watson super computer after launching its software defined storage options for the big data era.

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Oct 22, 2020

Fragment of rat brain simulated in supercomputer

Posted by in categories: neuroscience, supercomputing

Circa 2015


Blue Brain Project announces results of a decade’s work.

Oct 22, 2020

Million-core neuromorphic supercomputer could simulate an entire mouse brain

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, supercomputing

Circa 2018


After 12 years of work, researchers at the University of Manchester in England have completed construction of a “SpiNNaker” (Spiking Neural Network Architecture) supercomputer. It can simulate the internal workings of up to a billion neurons through a whopping one million processing units.

Continue reading “Million-core neuromorphic supercomputer could simulate an entire mouse brain” »

Oct 15, 2020

Nvidia will power world’s fastest AI supercomputer, to be located in Europe

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, supercomputing

Nvidia is is going to be powering the world’s fastest AI supercomputer, a new system dubbed “Leonardo” that’s being built by the Italian multi-university consortium CINECA, a global supercomputing leader. The Leonardo system will offer as much as 10 exaflops of FP16 AI performance capabilities, and be made up of more than 14,000 Nvidia Ampere-based GPUS once completed.

Leonardo will be one of four new supercomputers supported by a cross-European effort to advance high-performance computing capabilities in the region, which will eventually offer advanced AI capabilities for processing applications across both science and industry. Nvidia will also be supplying its Mellanox HDR InfiniBand networks to the project in order to enable performance across the clusters with low-latency broadband connections.

The other computers in the cluster include MeluXina in Luxembourg and Vega in Slovenia, as well as a new supercooling unit coming online in the Czech Republic. The pan-European consortium also plans four more Supercomputers for Bulgaria, Finland, Portugal and Spain; though, those will follow later and specifics around their performance and locations aren’t yet available.

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Oct 12, 2020

Generating Megatesla Magnetic Fields on Earth Using Intense-Laser-Driven Microtube Implosions

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, engineering, supercomputing

A team of researchers led by Osaka University discovers “microtube implosion,” a novel mechanism that demonstrates the generation of megatesla-order magnetic fields.

Magnetic fields are used in various areas of modern physics and engineering, with practical applications ranging from doorbells to maglev trains. Since Nikola Tesla’s discoveries in the 19th century, researchers have strived to realize strong magnetic fields in laboratories for fundamental studies and diverse applications, but the magnetic strength of familiar examples are relatively weak. Geomagnetism is 0.3−0.5 gauss (G) and magnetic tomography (MRI) used in hospitals is about 1 tesla (T = 104 G). By contrast, future magnetic fusion and maglev trains will require magnetic fields on the kilotesla (kT = 107 G) order. To date, the highest magnetic fields experimentally observed are on the kT order.

Recently, scientists at Osaka University discovered a novel mechanism called a “microtube implosion,” and demonstrated the generation of megatesla (MT = 1010 G) order magnetic fields via particle simulations using a supercomputer. Astonishingly, this is three orders of magnitude higher than what has ever been achieved in a laboratory. Such high magnetic fields are expected only in celestial bodies like neutron stars and black holes.

Continue reading “Generating Megatesla Magnetic Fields on Earth Using Intense-Laser-Driven Microtube Implosions” »

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