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Archive for the ‘science’ category: Page 8

Oct 21, 2019

Why should you always assume you’re wrong? Science

Posted by in categories: evolution, neuroscience, science

Assumptions: The Case Against Reality


When it comes to scientific theory, (or your personal life) be sure to question everything.

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Oct 18, 2019

Scientists may have discovered parallel universe

Posted by in categories: astronomy, cosmology, physics, science, space

Scientists believe they may have caught a glimpse of a parallel universe bumping up against ours.

They’ve seen hints in signals from the most distant points of the universe that suggest the fabric of our universe has been disrupted by another incredibly different universe. Their analysis may be the proof for the multiverse theory.

According to researchers: “Dr Ranga-Ram Chary examined the noise and residual signals in the cosmic microwave background left over from the Big Bang (pictured) and found a number of scattered bright spots which he believes may be signals of another universe bumping into our own billions of years ago.”

At least that’s the tentative conclusion researchers have come to. According to some cosmological theories, collisions of alternative universes should be possible. Theories conclude that our universe is like a bubble among many.

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Oct 18, 2019

Dialogues on the Future: New Video Series

Posted by in categories: education, entertainment, futurism, philosophy, science, time travel

Together with my fellow member of the World Futures Studies Federation, Dr. Thomas Lombardo, we have begun a YouTube video series of ongoing dialogues on topics pertaining to the future. In this first dialogue we focus on the book Science Fiction: The Evolutionary Mythology of the Future and discuss the nature and value of science fiction in the modern world. We discuss the historical evolution of science fiction and the nature of mythology and why science fiction is the modern mythology. In future dialogues we will delve more deeply into books on science fiction and more broadly on futures studies and future consciousness.

Oct 16, 2019

Virtual-reality applications give science a new dimension

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, science, virtual reality

Circa 2018


Virtual- and augmented-reality tools allow researchers to view and share data as never before. But so far, they remain largely the tools of early adopters.

Oct 16, 2019

In-Silico Clinical Trials — Virtual Bodies For Real Drugs — Dr. William Pruett — University of Mississippi Medical Center — ideaXme — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, DNA, futurism, genetics, health, life extension, neuroscience, science

Oct 12, 2019

Rough Science 1 Mediterranean Mystery

Posted by in categories: education, law enforcement, science

Time for my yearly proselytizing for PBS UK’s Rough Science. Awesome educational show where a bunch of scientists are dumped on an island and have to work together to make something crazy out of local scavenged materials.


The group is taken to a disused prison on the island where they have to determine the longitude and latitude of the island, create a radio from a saucepan and create an insect repellent.

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Oct 9, 2019

How science has shifted our sense of identity

Posted by in categories: biological, science

In the iconic frontispiece to Thomas Henry Huxley’s Evidence as to Man’s Place in Nature (1863), primate skeletons march across the page and, presumably, into the future: “Gibbon, Orang, Chimpanzee, Gorilla, Man.” Fresh evidence from anatomy and palaeontology had made humans’ place on the scala naturae scientifically irrefutable. We were unequivocally with the animals — albeit at the head of the line.


Biological advances have repeatedly changed who we think we are, writes Nathaniel Comfort, in the third essay of a series marking Nature’s anniversary on how the past 150 years have shaped science today. Biological advances have repeatedly changed who we think we are.

Oct 9, 2019

Ambassador Juan José Gómez Camacho — Mexico’s Ambassador to Canada — Migrant Health, Pandemics, and Aging — IdeaXme — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, geopolitics, governance, government, health, law, policy, science, strategy, sustainability

Oct 5, 2019

Dr. Kelly Drew — Institute of Arctic Biology — University of Alaska — Human Hibernation Biotech — ideaXme — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, cryonics, genetics, health, life extension, neuroscience, science, space travel

Oct 2, 2019

5 Beginner Friendly Steps to Learn Machine Learning and Data Science with Python

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, science

Thinking of #Upskilling? Check this out: If you want to learn machine learning and artificial intelligence, start here:

Two years ago, I started learning machine learning online on my own. I shared my journey through YouTube and my blog. I had no idea what I was doing. I’d never coded before but decided I wanted to learn machine learning.

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