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Archive for the ‘satellites’ category: Page 38

Sep 13, 2016

Sky and Space purchases four Virgin Galactic missions for nano-satellite launch

Posted by in category: satellites

The company will launch 200 miniature satellites through Virgin’s LauncherOne in order to provide mobile coverage to those living in remote areas worldwide.

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Sep 12, 2016

Auroras Seen Moving to the Rhythm of Earth’s Magnetic Field

Posted by in categories: electronics, satellites

The majestic auroras have captivated humans for thousands of years, but their nature – the fact that the lights are electromagnetic and respond to solar activity – was only realized in the last 150 years. Thanks to coordinated multi-satellite observations and a worldwide network of magnetic sensors and cameras, close study of auroras has become possible over recent decades. Yet, auroras continue to mystify, dancing far above the ground to some, thus far, undetected rhythm.

Using data from NASA’s Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, or THEMIS, scientists have observed Earth’s vibrating magnetic field in relation to the northern lights dancing in the night sky over Canada. THEMIS is a five-spacecraft mission dedicated to understanding the processes behind auroras, which erupt across the sky in response to changes in Earth’s magnetic environment, called the magnetosphere.

These aurora images were taken in 2013 from the ground looking up with a network of all-sky cameras spread across Canada, studying auroras in collaboration with THEMIS. Taking images of aurora from the ground in conjunction with satellite data taken from above the atmosphere gives scientists a more comprehensive picture of how and why auroras form.

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Sep 12, 2016

Tiangong-2: Second space lab

Posted by in categories: biological, physics, satellites

China’s 2nd spacelab launches next week. Now, I wonder how QSS will be leveraged given the note on new communication capabilities as well as other types of experiments that can be conducted.


Chinese space agency is all set to launch its second spacelab Tiangong-2 next week. Long March 2F rocket will lift up the spacelab and both the entities have been transported to the launch pad located at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, yesterday. Tiangong-2 will test life support systems and refueling technology for its 60 ton modular space station.

Tiangong-2 will be placed in an orbit of 393 kilometers above the Earth and it will help in studying fundamental physics, biology, fluid mechanics in microgravity, space science and will monitor Earth from space. In addition, it has the capability to measure the topography of the oceans with very high precision which will enable scientists to study Earth’s gravity field.

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Sep 11, 2016

US Air Force advances rocket technology

Posted by in categories: energy, military, satellites

The United States is one step closer to eliminating its reliance on Russian technology to launch its military satellites.

The Hydrocarbon Boost Technology Demonstrator, a U.S. Air Force technology effort focused on development of Oxygen Rich Staged Combustion rocket engine technology, has recently completed its first full-scale component test at 100-percent power.

The development of Oxygen Rich Staged Combustion technology has been deemed a critical technology for the nation to help eliminate the United States’ reliance on foreign rocket propulsion technology.

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Sep 7, 2016

China’s Quantum Satellite Experiments: Strategic And Military Implications – Analysis

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, government, military, quantum physics, satellites

Additional insights on QSS planned efforts; and (as with any government program) there is more to this program than these insights.


While China’s quantum science satellite (QSS) project is part of the Strategic Priority Programme on Space Science, the country’s first space exploration programme intended purely for scientific research, its experiments have significant military implications.

By Michael Raska

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Aug 31, 2016

Letter: U.S. lags far behind China in quantum computing technology

Posted by in categories: climatology, cybercrime/malcode, government, quantum physics, satellites, sustainability

The Wall Street Journal on Aug. 16 reported that China sent the world’s first quantum communications satellite into orbit. The newspaper also stated that China spent $101 billion in 2015 on quantum research and technology development. The satellite has the ability to greatly expand China’s ability to expand their unhackable communications.

Now we in the U.S. read almost daily about some U.S. computer system that has been hacked. Our current technology cannot be considered secure. So what is our government investing in?

According to the GAO, the U.S. spent over $10 billion on global climate change science and technology in 2014. Gave $400 million to Iran for who knows what, and spent about $200 million on quantum technology.

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Aug 31, 2016

China Readies Next ‘Heavenly Palace’ for Mid-September Launch

Posted by in category: satellites

China is readying its next piloted space mission, a multifaceted undertaking that will lay the foundation for the country to build a space station in Earth orbit in the 2020s.

Both Tiangong-2 (whose name means “Heavenly Palace”) and the piloted Shenzhou-11 spacecraft are now undergoing checkout at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China.

Tiangong-2, which is scheduled to launch in mid-September, is a true “space lab” that will verify key technologies for building China’s space station, according to its chief designer, Zhu Zongpeng. [Latest News About China’s Space Program].

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Aug 26, 2016

CIA reveals Spacenet ‘AI in the sky’ that could constantly monitor activity on Earth

Posted by in categories: computing, information science, robotics/AI, satellites

CIA reveals Spacenet ‘AI in the sky’ that could constantly monitor activity on Earth via high resolution satellites…


It sounds like something out of a sci-fi film — an AI that constantly monitors the Earth, looks for unusual activity.

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Aug 24, 2016

Why quantum satellites will make it harder for states to snoop

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, quantum physics, satellites

Very true point.


With the launch of the world’s first quantum communication satellite, the era of unhackable communication has begun.

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Aug 22, 2016

DARPA to establish satellite-servicing consortium to discuss on-orbit repair standards

Posted by in categories: government, robotics/AI, satellites

A first step in establishing repair standards on satellite in space; wonder could we eventually see a version of the EPA or in space.


SAN FRANCISCO — The U.S. Defense Research Projects Agency plans to establish a consortium to discuss standards and practices for on-orbit satellite servicing as a corollary to Robotic Servicing of Geostationary Satellites (RSGS), an effort to develop robotic spacecraft to inspect, repair and move other satellites.

“Our fear was that we would create a robotic servicing capability through RSGS and when our industry partner went to Lloyds of London for insurance, someone would say, ‘You have no authority to conduct that mission,’” said Brad Tousley, director of DARPA’s Tactical Technology Office.

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