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Archive for the ‘satellites’ category: Page 37

Mar 16, 2017

Secure Data Storage

Posted by in categories: computing, satellites, security

Launching small satellites with big storage capacities using the highest levels of security. Sensitive information is securely stored off-planet.

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Mar 14, 2017

Light wars: space-based lasers among Beijing’s hi-tech arms

Posted by in categories: military, satellites

Arsenal including electromagnetic railguns and microwave weapons aims to neutralize web of satellites that give US its main strategic edge.

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Mar 12, 2017

Recycling Space Junk for a LunarBase

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, satellites, sustainability

It costs $80k to send a Nano- Satellite into space! To send the materials to build a lunar base is going to be expensive!

This week it was announced that NASA found a forgotten satellite in Lunar Orbit, which got me thinking about an idea to recycle existing Space Junk in the construction of an International Lunar Base with cost savings. We could use a modified version of my Google Deepmind NEO tracker to source the Space Junk and the ideas listed below to capture and redirect the Space Junk.

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Mar 9, 2017

Massive commercial space push and a variety of new robotic capabilities could self supporting and rapidly growing space economy

Posted by in categories: economics, robotics/AI, satellites

Several companies will collectively be launching about 20,000 satellites over the next few years. SpaceX, OneWeb, Telesat, O3b Networks and Theia Holdings — all told the FCC they have plans to field constellations of V-band satellites in non-geosynchronous orbits to provide communications services in the United States and elsewhere. So far the V-band spectrum of interest, which sits directly above Ka-band from about 37 GHz to the low 50 GHz range, has not been heavily employed for commercial communications services.

* SpaceX, for example, proposes a “VLEO,” or V-band low-Earth orbit (LEO) constellation of 7,518 satellites to follow the operator’s initially proposed 4,425 satellites that would function in Ka- and Ku-band.

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Mar 5, 2017

Earth’s Orbiting Junkyard Threatens the Space Economy

Posted by in categories: economics, satellites

Rocket and satellite litter is endangering private space commerce. Enter the cosmic debris tracking industry.

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Mar 3, 2017

Researchers remotely control sequence in which 2-D sheets fold into 3D structures

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, nanotechnology, satellites, solar power, sustainability

Inspired by origami, North Carolina State University researchers have found a way to remotely control the order in which a two-dimensional (2-D) sheet folds itself into a three-dimensional (3D) structure.

“A longstanding challenge in the field has been finding a way to control the sequence in which a 2-D sheet will fold itself into a 3D object,” says Michael Dickey, a professor of chemical and at NC State and co-corresponding author of a paper describing the work. “And as anyone who has done origami — or folded their laundry—can tell you, the order in which you make the folds can be extremely important.”

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Mar 3, 2017

Richard Branson starting a new venture dedicated to launching small satellites into space

Posted by in category: satellites

Once focused primarily on flying tourists into space, Virgin senses an opportunity as the size and cost of satellites have been greatly reduced.

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Feb 26, 2017

Nano-Satellites Getting Closer to Take-Off

Posted by in category: satellites

This post is also available in: heעברית (Hebrew)

Enhancing situational awareness is a vital mission also in space. The US Department of Defense’s Strategic Command Joint Space Operations Center got Sky and Space’s signature on an agreement ahead of the company’s planned launch of 200 nano-satellites into space, as space junk continues to be a big issue.

The agreement provides for Sky and Space to receive “space situational awareness services” from the US Department of Defence so the company’s nano-satellites will be able to avoid objects like space junk and other satellites.

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Feb 26, 2017

The ‘Celestial Empire’ Looks to Space

Posted by in categories: futurism, satellites

China’s State Council, the country’s chief administrative authority, recently published a White Paper on its space policies. It not only lifted a veil of secrecy that shielded Beijing’s space policies, but also outlined the country’s recent achievements and offered a five-year outlook on future activities.

Since its first satellite launch in 1970, China has become a major player in the space domain. However, it was only in 2003 that China became the third country to independently send people into space.

Beijing has placed significant resources into narrowing the capability gap that has separated it from other leading nations in this area. It took only eight years from its entry into manned spaceflight, in 2003, to the launch of the first prototype component of its space station, the Tiangong-1.

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Feb 25, 2017

Computing with biochemical circuits made easy

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, computing, satellites

Electronic circuits are found in almost everything from smartphones to spacecraft and are useful in a variety of computational problems from simple addition to determining the trajectories of interplanetary satellites. At Caltech, a group of researchers led by Assistant Professor of Bioengineering Lulu Qian is working to create circuits using not the usual silicon transistors but strands of DNA.

The Qian group has made the technology of DNA accessible to even novice researchers—including undergraduate students—using a software tool they developed called the Seesaw Compiler. Now, they have experimentally demonstrated that the tool can be used to quickly design DNA circuits that can then be built out of cheap “unpurified” DNA strands, following a systematic wet-lab procedure devised by Qian and colleagues.

A paper describing the work appears in the February 23 issue of Nature Communications.

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