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Archive for the ‘internet’ category: Page 159

Feb 10, 2016

Announcing the Google Internet of Things (IoT) Technology Research Award Pilot — By Vint Cerf | Google Research Blog

Posted by in category: internet

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“Over the past year, Google engineers have experimented and developed a set of building blocks for the Internet of Things - an ecosystem of connected devices, services and “things” that promises direct and efficient support of one’s daily life. While there has been significant progress in this field, there remain significant challenges in terms of (1) interoperability and a standardized modular systems architecture, (2) privacy, security and user safety, as well as (3) how users interact with, manage and control an ensemble of devices in this connected environment.

It is in this context that we are happy to invite university researchers1 to participate in the Internet of Things (IoT) Technology Research Award Pilot.”

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Feb 8, 2016

What does artificial intelligence see when it watches political ads?

Posted by in categories: information science, internet, robotics/AI

Here is a concept to think about when we’re 20 or 30 years into the future — imagine a world where humans and all living things in it are truly Singular, and the new AI & Humanoid robots are alive and well. Will AI (including Robots) ever need therapy, will AI ever get stressed out or have panic attacks, will any humans know what AI is thinking once we give AI more independence?

I ask these questions because as we enhance and evolve AI to be like humans and interpret and process emotions, feelings, and interact like humans; will AI expeience fully the struggles of everyday life like some humans do? And, when needs counseling or therapy will they go to another AI or will they see a human therapist?

As we evolve AI; we must look at the full longer picture around AI including how human do we really wish to make AI.

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Feb 7, 2016

Scientists Are Trying to Create An Untraceable ‘Quantum Internet’

Posted by in categories: internet, quantum physics, security

Glad that Stanford is working on their own version because the US Government has their own and it has been online in Los Alamos for a while now; have more than one version to learn from only enriches the final version.


Researchers are a step closer to building a quantum technology that could help improve internet security.

Researchers from Stanford University in U.S. have created a novel quantum light source to help improve internet security. In other words, the scientists have designed a technology that might someday serve as the basis for quantum communication.

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Feb 6, 2016

Your only choice is to build better artificial intelligence tech than others: Brad Templeton

Posted by in categories: business, cybercrime/malcode, internet, mobile phones, nanotechnology, robotics/AI, security, singularity, transportation

Brand’s view and concerns about hacking driverless cars are valid. And, I do believe in time that government will eventually catch up in passing some laws that will make companies ensure that their technology is safe for consumer usage and are safe for the public. I just hope that the pendulum does swing too far to the other side of over regulation.


It is not easy to slot Brad Templeton. What do you make of a person who is not only the networks and computing chair at Singularity University in Silicon Valley but also a software architect, a director of the Foresight Nanotech Institute, board member of the cyberspace watchdog Electronic Frontier Foundation, the first person to have set up an Internet-based business, a futurist lecturer, hobby photographer, artist, as well as a consultant on Google’s driverless car design team?

In a phone interview from the US, Templeton, who will be in India this month as a key speaker during the SingularityU India Summit (to be held in association with INK, which hosts events like INKtalks—a platform for the exchange of cutting-edge ideas and inspiring stories), shared his views on driverless cars, the perceived threat from intelligent machines and censorship of the Internet. Edited excerpts:

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Feb 5, 2016

Robot Chef Serves Up the Future of Home Cooking

Posted by in categories: business, food, habitats, internet, robotics/AI

Moley Chef Robots reappearing again today across the web. These do hold a lot of opportunity for restaurant franchises as well as homes. However, AI in a business has a break even point before the investment is no longer a wise or sound investment.

Always step back and look at the bigger picture 1st (e.g. look at all costs & any risks/ liabilities). Look at initial purchase/ lease costs, any write off/ depreciation opportunities, know your customer & your brand (if your restaurant is because of your master chef then a robot is a line chef which you consider how much your spending on a line chef as well as replacing them v. a robotic chef), know your local food & safety regs. Never good to put in a series of robotic chefs and local ordinances and city committees pass restrictions that forces you to de-install your $60K robot after 1 or 2 yrs.

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Feb 5, 2016

AI Is Transforming Google Search. The Rest of the Web Is Next

Posted by in categories: internet, robotics/AI

As Google’s head of artificial intelligence takes charge of search, deep learning is already changing the way Googling works.

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Feb 4, 2016

India has to build its own capability in R&D

Posted by in categories: internet, mobile phones

I cannot wait to see India’s version of DARPA — it is probably going to be amazing.


India is unable to spend its defence modernisation budget, says a report in this newspaper. Out of a current year allocation of Rs 63,675 crore, 40% remained unspent by end-December. This is bad not just for upgrading defence capability but also for Indian research and development and for Indian manufacturing.

It is time defence reimagined its entire strategy for procurement, using a portion of its typically large outlays to stimulate R&D in universities and specialised labs and private companies, and to give Indian companies, big and small, a chance to become suppliers of parts and equipment on a scale much larger than what obtains today. The key is to create an Indian equivalent of the Americans’ Darpa.

Continue reading “India has to build its own capability in R&D” »

Feb 2, 2016

Apple takes interest in Stanford’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, internet, virtual reality

Apple and any other tech company with an interest in consumer interactive experience (communications, gaming, internet, video/ streaming media) knows you will need VR to remain relevant; and who can do it best will be king.


Rumors are stating that Apple is investing heavily in virtual and augmented reality solutions.

Apple representatives are said to be visiting Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab quite a bit more often. Founding director Jeremy Bailenson told the folks over at The Wall Street Journal that Apple’s recent visits were the first since the lab that was founded in 2003. Bailenson had the following to say regarding the matter:

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Feb 2, 2016

Why Ray Kurzweil’s Predictions Are Right 86% of the Time

Posted by in categories: computing, internet, law, Ray Kurzweil, singularity

It’s that time of the year again when techno pundits are once again breathlessly telling us all about the technology and innovation trends that will be big in 2013. That’s great, but many of those predictions will be hopelessly wrong by the end of March. That’s why it’s so fascinating that Ray Kurzweil, one of the leading thinkers when it comes to the future of technology, has had such a strong track record in making predictions about technology for nearly two decades. In fact, of the 147 predictions that Kurzweil has made since the 1990’s, fully 115 of them have turned out to be correct, and another 12 have turned out to be “essentially correct” (off by a year or two), giving his predictions a stunning 86% accuracy rate. So how does he do it?

The fact is, Ray has a system and this system is called the Law of Accelerating Returns. In his new book How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Human Thought Revealed, Kurzweil points out that “every fundamental measure of information technology follows predictable and exponential trajectories.” The most famous of these trajectories, of course, has been the price/performance path of computing power over more than 100 years. Thanks to paradigms such as Moore’s Law, which reduces computing power to a problem of how many transistors you can cram on a chip, anyone can intuitively understand why computers are getting exponentially faster and cheaper over time.

The other famous exponential growth curve in our lifetime is the sheer amount of digital information available on the Internet. Kurzweil typically graphs this as “bits per second transmitted on the Internet.” That means the amount of information on the Internet is doubling approximately every 1.25 years. That’s why “Big Data” is such a buzzword these days — there’s a growing recognition that we’re losing track of all the information we’re putting up on the Internet, from Facebook status updates, to YouTube videos, to funny meme posts on Tumblr. In just a decade, we will have created more content than existed for thousands of years in humanity’s prior experience.

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Feb 2, 2016

This is Microsoft’s plan to power the internet from under the sea

Posted by in categories: energy, internet

Microsoft has a radical plan to change the way we power content on the internet. And it involves installing data centers in the ocean.

microsoft project natick
Microsoft Research.

We use data centers for just about everything we see on the web: websites, images, videos, and software are all powered by servers that can both store and ship tons of data in mere seconds.

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