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Archive for the ‘evolution’ category: Page 10

Sep 25, 2023

Does Higher Education Still Prepare People for Jobs?

Posted by in categories: education, employment, evolution

In an age of unpredictable job evolution, it is hard to argue that the knowledge acquisition historically associated with a university degree is still relevant. But as university qualifications become more commonplace, recruiters and employers will increasingly demand them, regardless of whether they are actually required for a specific job. Research shows that the correlation between education level and job performance is weak, and that intelligence scores are a much better indicator of job potential. If we were to pick between a candidate with a college degree and a candidate with a higher intelligence score, we could expect the latter to outperform the former in most jobs, particularly when those jobs require constant thinking and learning.

Sep 24, 2023

Astronomers weigh ancient galaxies’ dark matter haloes for 1st time

Posted by in categories: cosmology, evolution

The measurement of the mysterious form of matter around these quasar galaxies could have profound implications for our understanding of how the cosmos has evolved.

Sep 23, 2023

Scientists discover clues to aging and healing from a squishy sea creature

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, life extension

Insights into healing and aging were discovered by National Institutes of Health researchers and their collaborators, who studied how a tiny sea creature regenerates an entire new body from only its mouth. The researchers sequenced RNA from Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus, a small, tube-shaped animal that lives on the shells of hermit crabs. Just as the Hydractinia were beginning to regenerate new bodies, the researchers detected a molecular signature associated with the biological process of aging, also known as senescence. According to the study published in Cell Reports, Hydractinia demonstrates that the fundamental biological processes of healing and aging are intertwined, providing new perspective on how aging evolved.

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/scientists-dis…a-creature

Continue reading “Scientists discover clues to aging and healing from a squishy sea creature” »

Sep 22, 2023

Zambia site shows humans made wood structures 500k years ago

Posted by in categories: evolution, materials

Professor Geoff Duller from Aberystwyth University explained that, given the considerable age of these artifacts, assigning precise dates to them presented a significant challenge. To address this issue, luminescence dating techniques were employed. These innovative dating methods have broad-ranging implications, enabling the dating of much older materials and facilitating the reconstruction of sites that offer insights into human evolution—in the case of Kalambo Falls, an excavation conducted in the 1960s yielded comparable wooden fragments. Still, their dating had remained elusive, leaving the true importance of the site uncertain until now.

Kalambo Falls is located on the Kalambo River above a 772-foot (235-meter) waterfall on the border of Zambia and Tanzania near Lake Tanganyika. The area is on a ‘tentative ‘list from UNESCO for becoming a World Heritage site because of its archaeological significance.

Sep 21, 2023

How Our GENES Listen To Our Beliefs: Heal The Body & Prevent Disease | Dr. Bruce Lipton

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, genetics, life extension

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There is powerful science behind how our beliefs inform our genetic expression. It’s not our genes alone that dictate our health outcomes, rather it’s the biology of belief that determines our destiny.

Continue reading “How Our GENES Listen To Our Beliefs: Heal The Body & Prevent Disease | Dr. Bruce Lipton” »

Sep 20, 2023

Tiny sea creatures reveal the ancient origins of neurons

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, neuroscience

A study in the journal Cell sheds new light on the evolution of neurons, focusing on the placozoans, a millimeter-sized marine animal. Researchers at the Center for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona find evidence that specialized secretory cells found in these unique and ancient creatures may have given rise to neurons in more complex animals.

Placozoans are tiny animals, around the size of a large grain of sand, which graze on algae and microbes living on the surface of rocks and other substrates found in shallow, warm seas. The blob-like and pancake-shaped creatures are so simple that they live without any body parts or organs.

Continue reading “Tiny sea creatures reveal the ancient origins of neurons” »

Sep 19, 2023

The Fermi Paradox & Panspermia

Posted by in categories: evolution, existential risks

Our current theory of evolution holds that all life on Earth originated from a single, simple life form billions of years ago. But what if that life did not originate on Earth? In this episode we’ll explore the theory of Panspermia, that origin of life might be extraterrestrial in origin, and that the abiogenesis of that origin life form we descend from might have descended from the sky in a comet or some other alien source. We will explore the impact this concept would have on the Fermi Paradox if true.
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Sep 17, 2023

Overeating and addiction may have roots in early human brain evolution and prosocial behaviors

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, food, health, neuroscience

Research led by the Department of Anthropology and School of Biomedical Sciences, Kent State University, Ohio, has investigated neuropeptide Y innervation in an area of the brain called the nucleus accumbens of various primate species, including humans. The research was focused on understanding its role in brain evolution and any implications for human health, particularly regarding addiction and eating disorders.

In a paper, “Hedonic eating, obesity, and addiction result from increased neuropeptide Y in the nucleus accumbens during human ,” published in PNAS, the researchers suggest that the combination of increased neuropeptide Y (NPY) and dopamine (DA) within the human nucleus accumbens (NAc) may have allowed for enhanced . This same configuration may have also made humans exceptionally vulnerable to eating disorders and , hinting at addictive traits having a deep evolutionary origin.

NPY plays a role in the reward system, emotional behavior and is associated with increased alcohol use, drug addiction and . The NAc brain region is central to motivation and action, exhibiting one of the highest densities of NPY in the brain and is of great interest to researchers investigating brain-related promoters of addiction.

Sep 16, 2023

Vast Bubble of Galaxies Discovered — Believed To Be a Remnant From the Universe’s Inception

Posted by in categories: cosmology, evolution

Astronomers have identified an immense bubble, Hoʻoleilana, 820 million light years away. This structure, believed to be a remnant from the universe’s inception and larger than predicted, offers valuable insights into galaxy evolution and the universe’s expansion dynamics.

A University of Hawaiʻi-led discovery of an immense bubble 820 million light years from Earth is believed to be a fossil-like remnant of the birth of the universe. Astronomer Brent Tully from the UH Institute for Astronomy and his team unexpectedly found the bubble within a web of galaxies. The entity has been given the name Hoʻoleilana, a term drawn from the Kumulipo, a Hawaiian creation chant evoking the origin of structure.

The new findings published on September 5 in The Astrophysical Journal.

Sep 16, 2023

Biological Masterpiece — Evolution Wired Human Brains To Act Like Supercomputers

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, evolution, neuroscience, supercomputing

Researchers have confirmed that human brains are naturally wired to perform advanced calculations, similar to e a high-powered computer, to make sense of the world through a process known as Bayesian inference.

In a recent study published in Nature Communications.

<em>Nature Communications</em> is a peer-reviewed, open-access, multidisciplinary, scientific journal published by Nature Portfolio. It covers the natural sciences, including physics, biology, chemistry, medicine, and earth sciences. It began publishing in 2010 and has editorial offices in London, Berlin, New York City, and Shanghai.

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