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Archive for the ‘computing’ category: Page 508

Dec 10, 2019

Google built its own tiny HDMI 2.1 box to jump-start “the next generation of Android TV”

Posted by in categories: computing, mobile phones, security

Today, Google is announcing that Android 10 is arriving on Android TV, and it’s about as bland of an update as they come. Primarily, it’s just the performance and security benefits of Android 10, without a single new user-facing feature. But at the bottom of Google’s blog post, the company hints at why: Google’s busy prepping for the “next-generation of Android TV,” starting with the miniature box above.

Google says this new ADT-3 dongle is a full-fledged Android TV platform, with a quad-core ARM Cortex A53 CPU, 2GB of DDR3 memory, and the ability to output 4K HDR content at 60 frames per second over its HDMI 2.1 port.

Dec 10, 2019

In surprise breakthrough, scientists create quantum states in everyday electronics

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, mobile phones, particle physics, quantum physics, transportation

After decades of miniaturization, the electronic components we’ve relied on for computers and modern technologies are now starting to reach fundamental limits. Faced with this challenge, engineers and scientists around the world are turning toward a radically new paradigm: quantum information technologies.

Quantum technology, which harnesses the strange rules that govern particles at the , is normally thought of as much too delicate to coexist with the electronics we use every day in phones, laptops and cars. However, scientists with the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering announced a significant breakthrough: Quantum states can be integrated and controlled in commonly used made from silicon carbide.

“The ability to create and control high-performance quantum bits in commercial electronics was a surprise,” said lead investigator David Awschalom, the Liew Family Professor in Molecular Engineering at UChicago and a pioneer in quantum technology. “These discoveries have changed the way we think about developing quantum technologies—perhaps we can find a way to use today’s electronics to build quantum devices.”

Dec 7, 2019

From mind control, brainwashing and monsters — theories claim Stranger Things happened in REAL LIFE in a secret government project

Posted by in categories: computing, food, government, mobile phones, neuroscience, quantum physics, time travel

In my humble opinion, this was very real but is still based on science. But quantum mechanics would democratize this technology rather than needing a human interface. I think in the right hands and doing good it comes essentially do so much even materializing water or food endlessly using psionic abilities. Really quantum mechanics could lead to even materializing a cup of coffee from a computer. This is probably the most groundbreaking knowledge because quantum mechanics can prove that this is real. There are still ethical problems with this technology but the possibilities make this essentially a cheaper form of a replicator than essentially a Higgs boson one may be using a lot less energy. If it was fully understood it could allow for real psionic abilities for everyone maybe using a device perhaps even with a limiter for safety or even air-gapped so it is just on a smartphone. One day you could essentially just press a button on a smartphone and a cup of coffee would materialize or your favorite beverage, not just a uber or teleportation but essentially real materializing which some say that has been used possibly since the founding of the planet earth based on mythology seen from all over the planet earth.


SPINE-chilling stories about the sinister goings-on at Camp Hero air force base in Montauk have long been the stuff of local legend.

Since the Seventies, tall tales have surrounded the derelict facility in Long Island, New York.

Continue reading “From mind control, brainwashing and monsters — theories claim Stranger Things happened in REAL LIFE in a secret government project” »

Dec 6, 2019

“This Could Be a Tragedy For Humanity” | The First Brain Chip Implant

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

“It’s the first chip implanted into the human brain”
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Dec 5, 2019

Researchers achieve quantum control of an oscillator using a Josephson circuit

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Superconducting circuits, which have zero electrical resistance, could enable the development of electronic components that are significantly more energy-efficient than most chips used today. Importantly, superconducting circuits rely on an electronic element known as the Josephson junction, which allows them to manipulate quantum information and mediate photon interactions. While past studies have tried to enhance the performance and coherence of Josephson circuits, so far, the most promising results in terms of photon lifetimes were achieved in microwave cavities.

A team of researchers at Princeton University, Northwestern University and the University of Chicago have directly operated an oscillator using a stimulated Josephson nonlinearity. In their paper, published in Nature Physics, the team achieved quantum control of an oscillator by operating it as an isolated two-level system, tailoring its Hilbert space.

“Our research was motivated by the ongoing effort in the superconducting circuits community to engineer highly coherent qubits for quantum information,” Prof. Andrew Houck, one of the researchers who carried out the study, told Phys.org. “There has been enormous progress in designing linear microwave resonators that can outperform the coherence of conventional superconducting qubits.”

Dec 5, 2019

Scientists have found out why photons from other galaxies do not reach Earth

Posted by in categories: computing, mathematics, particle physics, space

An international group of scientists, including Andrey Savelyev, associate professor of the Institute of Physical and Mathematical Sciences and Information Technologies of the IKBFU, has improved a computer program that helps simulate the behavior of photons when interacting with hydrogen spilled in intergalactic space. Results are published in the scientific journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Andrey Saveliev states, “In the Universe there are extragalactic objects such as blazars, which very intensively generate a powerful gamma-ray flux, part of photons from this stream reaches the Earth, as they say, directly, and part are converted along the way into electrons, then again converted into photons and only then get to us. The problem here is that say that a certain number of photons should reach the Earth, and in fact it is much less.”

Scientists, according to Andrey Savelyev, today have two versions of why this happens. The first is that a , after being converted into an electron (and this, as is known, in contrast to a neutral photon, a charged particle) falls into a , deviates from its path and does not reach the Earth, even after being transformed again into the photon.

Dec 4, 2019

This tiny chip is designed to replace animal testing

Posted by in category: computing

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Dec 4, 2019

Amazon Is Now Letting Anyone Run Programs on Its Quantum Computer

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Amazon Web Services is offering access to quantum computers so developers can tinker around.

Dec 3, 2019

Artificial neurons which could replace lost brain cells in Alzheimer’s, developed by scientists

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing

Artificial neurons which could be implanted in the brain to repair the damage caused by Alzheimer’s disease or other neurodegenerative conditions, have been invented by scientists.

The electronic cells, developed by teams at the University of Bath and a team of international collaborators, sit on a silicon chip and mimic the responses of biological neurons when triggered by the nervous system.

Neurons are specialised cells which transmit nerve impulses, allowing parts of the body to communicate, and are the core components of the brain, spinal cord and nervous system. They are also present around the heart.

Dec 3, 2019

World first as artificial neurons developed to cure chronic diseases

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing

Artificial neurons on silicon chips that behave just like the real thing have been invented by scientists—a first-of-its-kind achievement with enormous scope for medical devices to cure chronic diseases, such as heart failure, Alzheimer’s, and other diseases of neuronal degeneration.

Critically the artificial not only behave just like biological neurons but only need one billionth the power of a microprocessor, making them ideally suited for use in medical implants and other bio-electronic devices.

The research team, led by the University of Bath and including researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Zurich and Auckland, describe the artificial neurons in a study published in Nature Communications.