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Feb 4, 2023

The Longevity Field Now And In The Future | Dr Aubrey de Grey 2 Ep 4

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

This is more about the current landscape but a bit on the future near the beginning.


In this video Dr de Grey talks the future of LEVF and how the longevity field has evolved and some of the main participants.

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Feb 4, 2023

12 Patients of US Clinical Trial Emerge ‘Cancer-Free’; Does This Mean Cancer Has A Cure?

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Feature image credits: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

It was a life-changing day for 12 patients living in the United States when they found that their cancer had vanished, thanks to a small clinical trial. Of the total number of patients, these were the patients who completed the trial.

The New York Times reported that a drug named Dostarlimab was administered to these patients — all suffering from rectal cancer — over six months. All 12 patients entered remission after the period.

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Feb 4, 2023

Ready for Google’s Version of ChatGPT? We May Get a Glimpse Next Week

Posted by in categories: mapping, robotics/AI

Google’s competitor to OpenAI’s ChatGPT may appear as soon as next week. The company will hold an event in Paris on Wednesday, Feb. 8, where it will discuss plans for its search engine.

The company isn’t revealing much about the event. The description merely says (Opens in a new window) : “We’re reimagining how people search for, explore and interact with information, making it more natural and intuitive than ever before to find what you need. Join us to learn how we’re opening up greater access to information for people everywhere, through Search, Maps, and beyond.”

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Feb 4, 2023

A cnidarian parasite of salmon (Myxozoa: Henneguya) lacks a mitochondrial genome

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

Year 2020 This type of parasite that feeds on salmon actually doesn’t need oxygen to live. Which means eventually there could be even gene editing that could essentially allow humans to not need as much air or could be independent of oxygen but only need anaerobic metabolisms perhaps. Really this can only expand our understanding of new ways to evolve humans to the next level.


Although aerobic respiration is a hallmark of eukaryotes, a few unicellular lineages, growing in hypoxic environments, have secondarily lost this ability. In the absence of oxygen, the mitochondria of these organisms have lost all or parts of their genomes and evolved into mitochondria-related organelles (MROs). There has been debate regarding the presence of MROs in animals. Using deep sequencing approaches, we discovered that a member of the Cnidaria, the myxozoan Henneguya salminicola, has no mitochondrial genome, and thus has lost the ability to perform aerobic cellular respiration. This indicates that these core eukaryotic features are not ubiquitous among animals. Our analyses suggest that H. salminicola lost not only its mitochondrial genome but also nearly all nuclear genes involved in transcription and replication of the mitochondrial genome. In contrast, we identified many genes that encode proteins involved in other mitochondrial pathways and determined that genes involved in aerobic respiration or mitochondrial DNA replication were either absent or present only as pseudogenes. As a control, we used the same sequencing and annotation methods to show that a closely related myxozoan, Myxobolus squamalis, has a mitochondrial genome. The molecular results are supported by fluorescence micrographs, which show the presence of mitochondrial DNA in M. squamalis, but not in H. salminicola. Our discovery confirms that adaptation to an anaerobic environment is not unique to single-celled eukaryotes, but has also evolved in a multicellular, parasitic animal. Hence, H. salminicola provides an opportunity for understanding the evolutionary transition from an aerobic to an exclusive anaerobic metabolism.

Feb 4, 2023

These bacteria clean up radioactive waste

Posted by in category: biological

Year 2021 face_with_colon_three


For decades, scientists suspected that bacteria known as Geobacter could clean up radioactive uranium waste, but it wasn’t clear how the microbes did it.

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Feb 4, 2023

New Wave of Ransomware Attacks Exploiting VMware Bug to Target ESXi Servers

Posted by in category: cybercrime/malcode

A new wave of #ransomware attacks is exploiting a #VMware vulnerability to target #ESXi hypervisor servers.

Feb 4, 2023

‘My Life Came to a Standstill’: My Partner’s Unconditional Love Helped My Cancer Recovery

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Prasang Chandorkar was excited about turning a new leaf in his life after meeting Wachika on a matrimonial website. They soon got engaged and started planning their life ahead.

But little did they know what was in store for them. Soon after the engagement, in November 2021, Prasang was diagnosed with cancer. This brought his life to a standstill.

Feb 4, 2023

Unsolved for 500 Years: Researchers Crack Leonardo da Vinci’s Paradox

Posted by in category: particle physics

Professors Miguel Ángel Herrada of the University of Seville and Jens G. Eggers of the University of Bristol have uncovered a mechanism that explains the erratic movement of bubbles rising in water. The findings, published in the prestigious journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could provide insights into the behavior of particles that fall between solid and gas states.

Leonardo da Vinci observed five centuries ago that air bubbles, if big enough, periodically deviate in a zigzag or spiral from a straight-line movement. However, no quantitative description of the phenomenon or physical mechanism to explain this periodic motion had ever been found.

Feb 4, 2023

Bill Gates says A.I. like ChatGPT is ‘every bit as important as the PC, as the internet’

Posted by in categories: internet, mapping, robotics/AI, space

Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates knows a thing or two about paradigm shifts, having played a key role in personal computers becoming a thing. Today, he believes, an equally important development is beginning with ChatGPT and similar artificial intelligence tools.

“A.I. is going to be debated as the hottest topic of 2023. And you know what? That’s appropriate. This is every bit as important as the PC, as the internet,” Gates recently told Forbes, adding that he now spends about 10% of his time talking with Microsoft teams about their product road maps, despite having been long retired and focused on philanthropy.

ChatGPT, of course, is the A.I. chatbot that’s been making waves with its ability to respond to typed questions with eerily human-like responses. Launched a few months ago, ChatGPT now attracts more than 100 million monthly active users, according to a research note published Wednesday by UBS. It easily reached 100 million faster than TikTok or Instagram, the bank’s analysts noted, adding, “In 20 years following the internet space, we cannot recall a faster ramp in a consumer internet app.”

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Feb 4, 2023

Cathie Wood says that robots could overtake humans as Amazon workers within 7 years

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

ARK Invest’s Cathie Wood sees robots and other technologies being used across the manufacturing industry to drive costs down.

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