Blog

Feb 28, 2020

For a Bright Future of Work, We Must Get Better at Collaborating With Machines

Posted by in categories: economics, education, employment, robotics/AI

Ogba Educational Clinic


Theoretically, workers have been on the fast track to obsolescence since the Luddites took sledgehammers to industrial looms in the early 1800s.

In 1790, 90 percent of all Americans made their living as farmers; today it’s less than 2 percent. Did those jobs disappear? Not exactly. The agrarian economy morphed, first into the industrial economy, next into the service economy, now into the information economy.

Automation produces job substitution far more than it does job obliteration. And even when automation takes hold of a range of professional roles, this doesn’t always create the dire results we expect.

Leave a reply