Blog

Oct 1, 2019

For the September Journal Club we are taking a look at the new human trial data from the recent senolytics trial at the Mayo Clinic

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Click on photo to start video.

A follow on study from their previous human trial targeting IPF. This time the researchers ran a study to see how senolytics influenced diabetic kidney disease and if it actually removes senescent cells in humans.


Senescent cells, which can release factors that cause inflammation and dysfunction, the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), accumulate with ageing and at etiological sites in multiple chronic diseases. Senolytics, including the combination of Dasatinib and Quercetin (D + Q), selectively eliminate senescent cells by transiently disabling pro-survival networks that defend them against their own apoptotic environment. In the first clinical trial of senolytics, D + Q improved physical function in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a fatal senescence-associated disease, but to date, no peer-reviewed study has directly demonstrated that senolytics decrease senescent cells in humans.

Reference

Hickson, L. J., Prata, L. G. L., Bobart, S. A., Evans, T. K., Giorgadze, N., Hashmi, S. K., … & Kellogg, T. A. (2019). Senolytics decrease senescent cells in humans: Preliminary report from a clinical trial of Dasatinib plus Quercetin in individuals with diabetic kidney disease. EBioMedicine.

Leave a reply