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Mar 21, 2014

Futureketing: How to Systematically Understand and Succeed in a World of Frantically Accelerating Pace of Change! ─ An Omnimode Exploration.

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Futureketing:  How to Systematically Understand and Succeed in a World of Frantically Accelerating Pace of Change! ─ An Omnimode Exploration.  By © Copyright 2014 Mr. Andres Agostini ─ All Rights Reserved Worldwide.

(This Proprietary Book excerpt may be reproduced for noncommercial purposes if it is copied in its entirety, including this notice.

Please recall that “...if it is copied in its entirety, including this notice....”)

FUTUREKETING

PRECAUTION:  By any measure, the present work is an of-all-functions consideration.

Futureketing is about the rate of change. Not only change accelerated by new scientific discoveries and technological breakthroughs. Change is now poising new challenges, but also novel opportunities and benefits for those with a preparation and a will to make the most of twentieth-one century.

#1 FUTUREKETING® and the administration and application of the scientific method without innuendos and in crescendo as fluid points of inflections ascertain that the morrow is a thing of the past.

#2 FUTUREKETING®, subsequently, there is now and here available the unabridged, authoritative elicitation and elucidation of actionable knowledge from and for the incessantly arrhythmic, abrupt, antagonistic and anarchistic future, as well as the contentious interrelationship between such future and the present.

#3 FUTUREKETING®, a radical yet rigorous strong-sense and critico-creative womb-to-tomb «futures thinking», systems approach to quintessential understanding of the complexities, subtleties, and intricacies, as well as the opportunities to be exploited out of the driving forces instilling and inflicting perpetual change into twenty-first century.

#4 FUTUREKETING®, the ultimate way to understand the rate of change stemming from the so-called “...present....” What do you wish to understand the future for? You must understand the future in order to understand the most impermanent present.

You must interrelate or correlate connect the dots of every aspect that is included in this independent work.

Dr. Stephen Hawking argues that not to study more rigorously the outer space is “...foolish....” likewise, it’s beyond foolish not to comprehend the dynamic driving forces universally besieging our lives in the as-of-now present.

What is really the future? How can it be defined? All I have seen does not suffice to me. I would like the reader to amplify his or her mind by reading a creative yet accurate definition about the future! So, I have researched and assembled the world’s most breathtaking definition you can have in one locus. Ensuing now is a 7% of said researcher:

“ … The Future is 1) What is yet to come, 2) What can happen or not, 3) The future is a tranquil country, 4) The indefinite time yet to come, 5) Something that will happen in time to come, 6) A prospective or expected condition, 7) Undetermined events that will occur in that time,

Time that is to be or come hereafter, 9) Something that will exist or happen in time to come, 9) The period of time following the present moment and continuing on indefinitely, 10) The situation or condition of someone or something in the future,

11) One of a plurality of possible future conditions or situations, 12) The time or a period of time following the moment of speaking or writing; time regarded as still to come,
13) The future is what will happen in the time period after the present. Its arrival is considered inevitable due to the existence of time and the laws of physics. Due to the apparent nature of reality and the unavoidability of the future, everything that currently exists and will exist can be categorized as either permanent, meaning that it will exist for the whole of the future, or temporary, meaning that it won't and thus will come to an end. The future and the concept of eternity have been major subjects of philosophy, religion, and science, and defining them non-controversially has consistently eluded the greatest of minds. In the Occidental view, which uses a linear conception of time, the future is the portion of the projected time line that is anticipated to occur. In special relativity, the future is considered absolute future, or the future light cone.

14) The only way you can see the future is if you're ahead of your own time, 15) Learning how to be ahead of your time, today!, 16) The future is that the future is something that happens to us, not something we create,

17) Our future is determined by the actions of all of us alive today. our choices determine our destiny, 18) The future is a phenomenon that will be completely real someday even though it does not exist today,

19) Future is too important to be lost under the burden of juvenile folly and ignorant superstition, 20) Our intuition about the future is linear, which is hard-wired in our brains, 21) The future is being colonized all the time by people who have the resources, who do spend time thinking about it, planning for it and trying to shape it in their direction,

22) The future is already here; it’s just not evenly distributed, 23) the future is called ‘perhaps,’ which is the only possible thing to call the future. and the important thing is not to allow that to scare you, 24) The future is unsure. that’s the way it should be,

25) The past cannot be changed. The future is yet in your power, 26) The future is the past of to-morrow, 27) The best way to predict the future is to invent it, 28) To be masters of the future is to change the past,

29) The future is extremely important to high morale, to dynamism, to consensus, and in general to help the wheels of society turn smoothly, 30) The past is gone, the future is not to come, and the present becomes the past even while we attempt to define it, 31) The future is not for the fainthearted, 32) The future is not an echo of the past,

33) The future is not a privilege but a perpetual conquest, 34) The future is not what will happen; the future is what is happening, 35) The future is more challenging than playing catch up, 36) The future is not an extrapolation of the past, 37) The future is not something we enter. The future is something we create,

38) The future is an unknown country which requires tough visas for anyone to enter. Not all of us will get the chance to visit it, 39) The future is not what is coming at us, but what we are headed for, 40) The future is where I expect to spend the rest of my life, 41) The danger of the future is that men may become robots,

42) The future is the creation of millions of independent economic actors, 43) The future is independent of the past, 44) The future is alive. Like the present, the future is not a single, uniform state but an ongoing process that reflects the plenitude of human life, 45) The future is natural, out of anyone’s control,

46) The future is continually stalking on the present, 47) The future is technocracy in perpetuity, 48) The future is eternally clashing the present, 49) The future is absolute hard science dominance,

50) The future is going to get invented, with you or without you, 51) The future is S-H-A-Z-A-M ('...The wisdom of Solomon, the stamina of Atlas, the power of Zeus, the courage of Achilles, and the speed of Mercury....') and

52) The future is not something that happens to us, but something we create ...”
REGARDING DYNAMIC DRIVING FORCES (DDC OR CHANGE DRIVERS), LET US UNDERSTAND THE DEFINITION AND CONCEPT, THE MOST COMMON DYNAMIC DRIVING FORCES AND THE LINK BETWEEN DYNAMIC DRIVING FORCES AND STRATEGY ( http://bit.ly/1ggRYgm ).

BEGINNING OF THE RESPECTIVE QUOTATION:

“ ...Driving forces are forces outside the firm (external factors) that trigger the change of strategy in an organization. Industry conditions change because important forces (the most dominant ones that have the biggest influence on what kinds of changes will take place in the industry’s structure and competitive environment) are driving industry participants (competitors, customers, or suppliers) to alter their actions, and thus the driving forces in an industry are the major underlying causes of changing industry and competitive conditions. Driving forces analysis has two steps: identifying what the driving forces are and assessing the impact they will have on the industry ...”

And:

“... Sound analysis of an industry’s driving forces is a prerequisite to sound strategy making. Without keen awareness of what external factors will produce the biggest potential changes in the company’s business over the next one to three years, managers will ill prepare to craft (pay attention to the usage of this word—why not use MAKE) a strategy tightly matched to emerging conditions. Similarly, if managers are uncertain about the implications of each driving force or if their views are incomplete or off-base, it’s difficult for them to craft a strategy that is responsive to the driving forces and their consequences for the industry. So driving forces is not something to take lightly; it has practical strategy-making value and is basic to the task of thinking strategically about where the industry is headed and how to prepare for the changes ….Other dynamic driving forces include geologic, climatologist, political, geopolitical, demographic, social, ethical, economic, technological, financial, legal and environmental, among others ...”

END OF THE RESPECTIVE QUOTATION.

Incidentally, I want to share a quotation that was also given to me in business luncheon promoted by the Swiss Embassy. It is attributed to Dr. Henry Kissinger and it says: “...An ignored issue is an invite to a problem...”

By way of example, Winston Churchill accordingly argues, “...The goal of forecasting is not to predict the future but TO TELL YOU WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TO TAKE MEANINGFUL ACTION IN THE PRESENT...” [207]

To contrast Churchill’s motion, it is important to observe that Peter Drucker indicated that hominids are not prepared to make choices and decisions.

In accordance with Drucker, there is the great thought by Dr. Carl Sagan. He frustratedly indicated, “...We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows about science and technology...”

Greatly considering and agreeing with Drucker and Sagan, I strongly argue that there is a sort of first-order existential risk directly made by men that, both in public and private office, rampantly violate ethics, beginning with politicians.

Considering the preceding paragraph, I have a question to ask: With the advent of, for lack of a better term, a worldwide Sodom and Gomorrah (http://bit.ly/1kJkvu7), Is it possible to make the practical case for ethics and integrity? I am sorry to say: I don't think so. Ted Tuner says that humans are “...dumb...” while NASA scientists and Dr. Henry Mintzberg PhD. argue that hominids are “...unstable ...” and “...flawed...”, respectively.
Furthermore, present dynamic driving forces (science, technology, society, politics, and economy) are churning insurmountable amounts of unprecedented change with increasing energy and scope. Some people understand this notion to some extent.

I will share the definition I like about change now:

“... Change is to transfer from (one conveyance) to another and/or to undergo transformation or transition and/or to go from one phase to another and/or the act, process, or result of altering or modifying and/or the replacing of one thing for another; substitution and/or a transformation or transition from one state, condition, or phase to another and/or to make or become different and/or a variation, deviation, or modification and/or anything that is or may be substituted for something else and/or to transform and/or to transfer from one (conveyance) to another and/or to pass gradually into and/or to pass from one phase to another and/or the act of changing or the result of being changed and/or a transformation or modification and/or the substitution of one thing for another and/or the process of becoming different and/or impermanence and/or biological metamorphosis ...”

Many people believe themselves to consume news through a variety of outlets while sustaining a belief system rooted in wrong assumptions and a flawed belief system.

As a result, their cosmosvision foster superficiality and over simplification in this multi-eon era that ruthlessly demands gargantuan attention, fluidly and forever.

Some are upset and angry, without having the slightest idea of what motivates such appalling bewilderment.

Conversely, What are the Voices of the Twenty-First Century reflecting on forthcoming future, in contemporary times?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #1:

“... The ongoing changes in both the nature of work and the structure of employment foreshadow not just change but a seismic quake; a quantum shift in our very understanding of what it means to work, learn, and live .... THE AMERICAN ECONOMY —AND SOCIETY — ARE ABOUT TO EXPERIENCE A WAVE OF CHANGE THAT WILL CRASH UPON US WITH A FORCE WE HAVE NEVER KNOWN BEFORE. For higher education, this will mean dramatic changes in the requirements that graduates will be expected to meet, and in the makeup and needs of the postsecondary student population. It will also mean revolutionary innovations in the ways that colleges and universities deliver their services and how they organize themselves to develop products to meet new marketplace demands. Many who read this article will see this wave of change as frightening. But it does not have to be viewed that way .... In fact, for all the loss and risk our collective future portends, it also offers unparalleled opportunity. In a very real sense, for higher education, for America, and for humankind, the light at the end of the twentieth century is the limitless promise of the twenty-first century...” [198]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #2: (… The quickening of scientific and technological innovation under an illustriously big-picture panorama as of 2002! ...)

“...The gap between the recent past and the immediate future has never been so gaping, because the future now arrives at a rate and a magnitude like never before. By my estimate, the pace of technological innovation is accelerating arithmetically, and the number of meaningful new possibilities is expanding geometrically. Which says something about our most immediate future. Research into both pure and application-specific science, ranging from the most complex, such as genetic engineering, to the most exotic, such as nuclear fusion reactors, has reached a stage where no government or independent institute can measure it fiscally, or in terms of volume and yield. Not because of the enormous amount of capital invested, but as a consequence of its diverse and spontaneous nature, And since we cannot measure it, we do not know what will emerge .... In 1800, the state of the art was the stationary steam engine, the size of a house. It was only 90 years ago when Orville and Wilbur Wright's primitive wooden plane made its short, but mammoth, breakthrough glide. In the Middle Ages, both these contraptions would have been perceived as witchcraft. A mere 25 years ago the entire U.S. ...”

And Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #2 (continues:)

“ … Strategic early warning system was based on the Q7 mainframe computer; it took an area the size of a football pitch to house it. Today we can store 10,000 times the computational power in an area of a postage stamp. And think of this: the first draft of the infamous human genome mapping project was completed on 26 June 2000. When first planned, the entire genetic map of human biology was set to be completed around 2020. The project came in 20 years before time .... To underline all of this, the great Buckminster Fuller once estimated that about 5,000 years ago a notable invention occurred every few hundred years or so. By A.D. 0 there was one every 50 or so years. By A.D. 1000 the time has shrunk to 30 years. With the advent of the industrial revolution it was down to a significant invention every six months; and 100 years later, down to only three months. By the middle of the twentieth century the time has shortened further, and a major breakthrough occurred at the rate of one per month. ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #2 (continues:)

“ ... And today [2002], the rate of innovation is just too vast, and too fast, to measure with any meaningful accuracy .... Change quickening, and its slipstream is the first reason why we cannot predict even the most immediate future. The sheer speed and magnitude of change going on, drown out any possibility of getting a grip on what comes next, and what comes after what comes next .... The tempo of technological innovation depends also on the interconnection of ideas. In fact, this may be the root feed for the acceleration of change. As we have explored, ideas interconnect in nonlinear, acausal ways, giving up both novel and unexpected innovations. Science and technology in one field can bring about tremendous, sudden changes in other sciences or technology. What will we discover in molecular biology or synthetic chemistry, or discover in high-energy physics in the next 10 or 20 years? What will be the interconnected and enabling effects of biotechnology or nanotechnology over the next 25 or so years? Professor John Marie Lehn of the University of Strasbourg says that one area that is limitless is chemistry. It is not like physics, which behave within certain laws and is there to be discovered, chemistry is a creative process and only limited by the imagination. And when one considers the volume and speed of scientific and technological innovation going on today, the vast and increasing interconnection between minds and our ideas, it is not so unrealistic to speculate changes in the very way we live, to exceed anything we can now imagine ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #2 (continues:)

“ … The fact is, change is not only accelerating, it is also multidimensional. For every innovation, there is an unexpected string of related and unrelated events and outcomes impossible to predict until they arrive. The transistor enabled the microprocessor and software code, with this came leaps in productivity, empowering more creative work, giving more opportunities, expanding possibilities. Microcomputing brought with it new forms of communications and media, which further improved productivity, with new possibilities in leisure and entertainment, home automation and domestic appliances. None of this remarkable enterprise could have been assumed logically from the primeval conditions around the humble transistor. The nonlinearity of change sees that sooner, rather than later, events will diverge from all rational projections, and often in counterintuitive ways. So when we naturally ask what changes nanotechnology will evoke, or what artificial intelligence will bequeath, the inquiry is met with a cold retort: we cannot know in all its detail what will happen until events actually occur. As only history is frozen in time, so it is only history that is certain...” [201]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #3:

Dr. Michio Kaku, Ph.D. indicates, “... By the end of the twentieth century, science had reached the end of an era, unlocking the secrets of the atom, unraveling the molecule of life, and creating the electronic computer. With these three fundamental discoveries, triggered by the quantum revolution, the DNA revolution, and the computer revolution, the basic laws of matter, life, and computation were, in the main, finally solved .... That epic phase of science is now drawing to a close; one era is ending and another is only beginning .... The next era of science promises to be an even deeper, more thoroughgoing, more penetrating one than the last .... Clearly, we are on the threshold of yet another revolution. HUMAN KNOWLEDGE IS DOUBLING EVERY TEN YEARS [AS PER THE 1998 STANDARDS]. In the past decade, more scientific knowledge has been created than in all of human history. COMPUTER POWER IS DOUBLING EVERY EIGHTEEN MONTHS. THE INTERNET IS DOUBLING EVERY YEAR. THE NUMBER OF DNA SEQUENCES WE CAN ANALYZE IS DOUBLING EVERY TWO YEARS. Almost daily, the headlines herald new advances in computers, telecommunications, biotechnology, and space exploration. In the wake of this technological upheaval, entire industries and lifestyles are being overturned, only to give rise to entirely new ones. But these rapid, bewildering changes are not just quantitative. They mark the birth pangs of a new era ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #3 (continues:)

“ ...FROM NOW TO THE YEAR 2020, SCIENTISTS FORESEE AN EXPLOSION IN SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITY SUCH AS THE WORLD HAS NEVER SEEN BEFORE. IN TWO KEY TECHNOLOGIES, COMPUTER POWER AND THE DNA SEQUENCING, WE WILL SEE ENTIRE INDUSTRIES RISE AND FALL ON THE BASIS OF BREATHTAKING SCIENTIFIC ADVANCES. SINCE THE 1950S, THE POWER OF OUR COMPUTERS HAS ADVANCED BY A FACTOR OF ROUGHLY TEN BILLION. IN FACT, BECAUSE BOTH COMPUTER POWER AND DNA SEQUENCING DOUBLE ROUGHLY EVERY TWO YEARS, ONE CAN COMPUTE THE ROUGH TIME FRAME OVER WHICH MANY SCIENTIFIC BREAKTHROUGHS WILL TAKE PLACE .... BY 2020, MICROPROCESSORS WILL LIKELY BE AS A CHEAP AND PLENTIFUL AS SCRAP PAPER, SCATTERED BY THE MILLIONS INTO ENVIRONMENT, ALLOWING US TO PLACE INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS EVERYWHERE. THIS WILL CHANGE EVERYTHING AROUND US, INCLUDING THE NATURE OF COMMERCE, THE WEALTH OF NATIONS, AND THE WAY WE COMMUNICATE, WORK, PLAY, AND LIVE...” [171]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #4:

“...Nanotechnologies are broad concept, it’s simply refers to technology where the key features in measuring the small number of nanometers. A NANOMETER IS THE DIAMETER OF FIVE CARBON ATOMS SO IT’S VERY CLOSE TO THE MOLECULAR LEVEL AND WE ALREADY HAVE NEW MATERIALS AND DEVICES THAT HAD BEEN MANUFACTURED AT THE NANOSCALE. IN FACT, CHIPS TODAY, THE KEY FEATURES ARE 50 OR 60 NANOMETERS SO THAT IS ALREADY NANOTECHNOLOGY ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #4 (continues:)

“ ...The true promise of nanotechnology is that ultimately we’ll be able to create devices that are manufactured at the molecular level by putting together, molecular fragments in new combinations so, I can send you an information file and a desktop nanofactory will assemble molecules according to the definition in the file and create a physical objects so I can e-mail you a pair of trousers or a module to build housing or a solar panel and WE’LL BE ABLE TO CREATE JUST ABOUT ANYTHING WE NEED IN THE PHYSICAL WORLD FROM INFORMATION FILES WITH VERY INEXPENSIVE INPUT MATERIALS. You can… I mean, just a few years ago if I wanted to send you a movie or a book or a recorded album, I would send you a FedEx package, now I can e-mail you an attachment and you can create a movie or a book from that. On the future, I’ll be able to e-mail you a blouse or a meal. So, that’s the promise of nanotechnology. Another promise is to be able to create devices that are size of blood cells and by the way biology is an example of nanotechnology, the key features of biology are at the molecular level ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #4 (continues:)

“ … SO, THAT’S ACTUALLY THE EXISTENCE PROOF THAT NANOTECHNOLOGY IS FEASIBLE BUT BIOLOGY IS BASED ON LIMITED SIDE OF MATERIALS. EVERYTHING IS BUILT OUT OF PROTEINS AND THAT’S A LIMITED CLASS OF SUBSTANCES. WITH NANOTECHNOLOGY WE CAN CREATE THINGS THAT ARE FAR MORE DURABLE AND FAR MORE POWERFUL. One scientist designed a robotic red blood cell it’s a thousand times more powerful than the biological version so, if you were to replace a portion of your biological red blood cells with this respirocytes the robotic versions. You could do an Olympic sprint for 15 minutes without taking a breath or sit at the bottom of your pool for 4 hours. If I were to say someday you’ll have millions or even billions of these nanobots, nano-robots, blood cell size devices going through your body and keeping you healthy from inside, I might think well, that sounds awfully futuristic ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #4 (continues:)

“ … I’d point out this already in 50 experiments in animals of doing exactly that with the first generation of nano engineered blood cell size devices. One scientist cured type 1 diabetes in rats with the blood cell size device. Seven nanometer pores let’s insulin out in the controlled fashion. At MIT, there’s a blood cell size device that can detect and destroy cancer cells in the bloodstream. These are early experiments but KEEP IN MIND THAT BECAUSE OF THE EXPONENTIAL PROGRESSION OF THIS TECHNOLOGY, THESE TECHNOLOGIES WILL BE A BILLION TIMES MORE POWERFUL IN 25 YEARS AND YOU GET SOME IDEA WHAT WILL BE FEASIBLE ...” [199]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5:

“...We may end up in a FUTURE where employment is high, but even the unemployed serve as managers of their own cadre of ROBOT WORKERS...” [192]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (Bill Gates tells Scientific American about “...A Robot in Every Home: The leader of the PC revolution predicts that the next hot field will be robotics...” ). Ensuing:

“...Imagine being present at the birth of a new industry. It is an industry based on groundbreaking new technologies, wherein a handful of well-established corporations sell highly specialized devices for business use and a fast-growing number of start-up companies produce innovative toys, gadgets for hobbyist and other interesting niche products. But it is also a highly fragmented industry with few common standards or platforms. Projects are complex, progress is slow, and practical applications are relatively rare. In fact, for all the excitement and promise, no one can say with any certainty when ─ or even if ─ this industry will achieve critical mass. If it does, though, it may change the world ... Of course, that paragraph above could be a description of the computer industry during the mid-1970s, around the time that Paul Allen and I launched Microsoft. Back then, big, expensive mainframe computers ran the back-office operations for major companies, governmental departments and other institutions ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … Researchers at leading universities and industrial laboratories were creating the basic building blocks that would make the information age possible. Intel has just introduced the 8080 microprocessor, and Atari was selling the popular electronic game Pong. At home ground computer clubs, enthusiast to figure out exactly what this new technology was good for ... But what I really have in mind is something much more contemporary: the emergence of the robotic industry, which is developing in much the same way the computer business did 30 years ago. Think of the manufacturing robots currently used on automobile assembly lines as the equivalent of yesterday’s mainframes. The industry’s niche products include robotic arms that perform surgery, surveillance robots deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan that dispose of roadside bombs, and domestic robots vacuum the floor. Electronic companies have made robotic toys that can imitate people or dogs or dinosaurs, and hobbyists are anxious to get their hands on the latest version of the Lego robotic system ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ ...Meanwhile some of the world’s best minds are trying to solve the toughest problems of robotics, such as visual recognition, navigation and machine learning. And they are succeeding. At the 2004 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Grand Challenge, a completion to produce the first robotic vehicle capable of navigating autonomously over a rugged 142-mile course though the Mojave Desert, the top competitor managed to travel just 7.4 miles before breaking down. In 2005, though, five vehicles covered the complete distance, and the race’s winner did it at an average speed of 19.1 miles an hour. (In another intriguing parallel between the robotics and computer industries, DARPA also funded the work that led to the creation of Arpanet, the precursor to the Internet) ... What is more, the challenges facing the robotic industry are similar to those we tackled in computing three decades ago. Robotic companies have no standard operating software that could allow popular application programs to run in a variety of devices. The standardization of robotic processors and other hardware is limited, and very little of the programming code used in one machine can be applied to another. Whenever somebody wants to build a new robot, they usually have to start from square one ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … Despite these difficulties, when I talk to people involved in robotics ─ from university researchers to entrepreneurs, hobbyists and high school students ─ the level of excitement and expectation reminds me so much of that time when Paul Allen and I looked at the convergence of new technologies and dreamed of the day when a computer would be on every desk and in every home. And as I look at the trends that are now starting to converge, I can envision a future in which robotic devices will become a nearly ubiquitous part of our day-to-day lives. I believe that technologies such as distributed computing voice and visual recognition, and wireless broadband connectivity will open the door to a new generation of autonomous devices that enable computers to perform tasks in the physical world on our behalf. We may be on the verge of a new era, when the PC will get up off the desktop and allow us to see, hear, touch and manipulate objects in places where we are not physically present ... The word ‘ROBOT’ was popularized in 1921 by Czech playwright Karel Capek, but people have envisioned creating robotlike devices for thousands of years. In Greek and Roman mythology, the gods of metalwork built mechanical servants made from gold. In the first century A.D., Heron of Alexandria ─ the great engineer credited with inventing the first steam engine ─ designed intriguing automatons, including one said to have the ability to talk. Leonardo da Vinci’s 1495 sketch of a mechanical knight, which could sit up and move its arms and legs, is considered to be the first plan for a humanoid robot ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … Over the past century, anthropomorphic machines have become familiar figures in popular culture through books such as Isaac Asimov’s I, Robot, movies such as Star Wars and television shows such as Star Trek. The popularity of robots in fiction indicates that people are receptive to the idea that these machines will one day way among us as helpers and even as companions. Nevertheless, although robots play a vital role in industries such as automobile manufacturing ─ where there is about one robot for every 10 workers ─ the fact is that we have a long way to go before real robots catch up with their science-fiction counterparts ... One reason for this gap is that it has been much harder than expected to enable computers and robots to sense their surrounding environment and to react quickly and accurately. It has provoked difficult to give robots the capabilities that humans take for granted ─ for example, the abilities to orient themselves with respect to the objects in room, to respond to sounds and interpret speech, and to grasp objects of varying size, textures and fragility. Even something as simple as telling the difference between an open door and a window can be devilishly tricky for a robot ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … But researchers are starting to find the answers. One trend that has helped them is the increasing availability of tremendous amounts of computer power. One megahertz of processing power, which cost more than $7,000 in 1970, can now be purchased for just pennies. The access to cheap power has permitted scientists to work on many of the hard problems that are fundamental to making robots practical. Today, for example, voice-recognition programs can identify words quite well, but a far greater challenge will be building machines that can understand what those words mean in context. As computing capacity continues to expand, robot designers will have the processing power they need to tackle issues of ever greater complexity ... Another barrier to the development of robots has been the high cost of hardware, such as sensors that enable a robot to determine to an object as well as motors and servos that allow the robot to manipulate an object with both strength and delicacy. But prices are dropping fast. Laser range finders that are used in robotics to measure distance with precision cost about $10,000 a few years ago; today they can be purchased for about $2,000. And new, more accurate sensors based on ultrawideband radar are available for even less ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … Now robot builders can also add Global Positioning System chips, video cameras, array microphones (which are better than conventional microphones at distinguishing a voice from a background noise) and a host of additional sensors for a reasonable expense. The resulting enhancement of capabilities, combined with expanded processing power and storage, allows today’s robots to do things such as vacuum a robot or help to defuse a roadside bomb ─ tasks that would have been impossible for commercially produced machines just a few years ago ... In February 2004 I visited a number of leading universities, including Carnegie Mellon University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, Cornell University and the University of Illinois, to talk about the powerful role that computers can play in solving some of society’s most pressing problems. My goal was to help students understand how exciting and important computer science can be, and I hoped to encourage a few of them to think about careers in technology ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ ... At each university, after delivering my speech, I had the opportunity to get a firsthand look at some of the most interesting research projects in the school’s computer science department. Almost without exception, I was shown at least one project that involved robotics ... At that time, my colleagues at Microsoft were also hearing people in academia and at commercial robotics firms who wondered if our company was doing any work in robotics that might help them with their own development efforts. We were not, so we decided to take a closer look. I asked Tandy Trower, a member of my strategic staff and a 25-year Microsoft veteran, to go on an extended fact-finding mission and to speak with people across the robotics community. What he found was universal enthusiasm for the potential of robotics, along with an industry-wide desire for tools that would make development easier. ‘Many see the robotics industry at a technological turning point where a move to PC architecture makes more and more sense,’ Tandy wrote in his report to me after his fact-finding mission. ‘As Red Whitaker, leader of [Carnegie Mellon’s] entry in the DARPA Grand Challenge, recently indicated, the hardware capability is mostly there; now the issue is getting the software right.’ ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … Back in the early days of the personal computers, we realized that we needed an ingredient that would allow all of the pioneering work to achieve critical mass, to coalesce into a real industry capable of producing truly useful products on a commercial scale. What was needed, it turned out, was Microsoft BASIC. When we created this programming language in the 1970s, we provided the common foundation that enabled programs developed for one set of hardware to run on another. BASIC also made computer programming much easier, which brought more and more people into the industry. Although a great many individuals made essential contributions to the development of the personal computer, Microsoft BASIC was one of the key catalysts for the software and hardware innovations that made the PC revolution possible ... After reading Tandy’s report, it seemed clear to me that before the robotics industry could make the same kind of quantum leap that the PC industry made 30 years ago, it, too, need to find that missing ingredient. ...”

“ … So I asked him to assemble a small team that would work with people in the robotics field to create a set of programming tools that would provide the essential plumbing so that anybody interested in robots with even the most basic understanding of computer programming could easily write robotic applications that would work with different kinds of hardware. The goal was to see if it was possible to provide the same kind of common, low-level foundation for integrating hardware and software into robot designs that Microsoft BASIC provided for computer programmers ... Tandy’s robotics group has been able to drawn a number of advanced technologies developed by a team working under the direction of Craig Mundie, Microsoft’s chief research and strategy officer. One such technology will help solve one of the most difficult problems facing robot designers: how to simultaneously handle all the data coming in from multiple sensors and send the appropriate commands to the robot’s motors, a challenge known as concurrency ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … A conventional approach is to write a traditional, single-threaded program ─ a long loop that first reads all the data from the sensors, then processes this input and finally delivers output that determines the robot’s behavior, before starting the loop all over again. The shortcomings are obvious: if your robot has fresh sensor data indicating that the machine is at the edge of a precipice, but the program is still at the bottom of the loop calculating trajectory and telling the wheels to turn faster based on previous sensor input, there is a good chance the robot will fall down the stairs before it can process the new information ... Concurrency is a challenge that extends beyond robotics. Today as more and more applications are written for distributed networks of computers, programmers have struggled to figure out how to efficiently orchestrate code running on many servers at the same time. And as computers with a single processor are replaced by machines with multiple processors and ‘multicore’ processors ─ integrated circuits with two or more processors joined together for enhanced performance ─ software designers will need a new way to program desktop applications and operating systems. To fully exploit the power of processors working in parallel, the new software must deal with the problem of concurrency ... One approach to handling concurrency is to write multi-threaded programs that allow data to travel along many paths ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … But as any developer who has written multithreaded code can tell you, this is one of the hardest tasks in programming. The answer that Craig’s team has devised to the concurrency problem is something called the concurrency and coordination runtime (CCR). The CCR is a library of functions ─ that makes it easy to write multithreaded applications that can coordinate a number of simultaneous activities. Designed to help programmers take advantage of the power of multicore and multiprocessor systems, the CCR turns out to be ideal for robotics as well. By drawing on this library to write their programs, robot designers can dramatically reduce the chances that one of their creations will run into a wall because its software is too busy sending output to its wheels to read input from its sensors ... In addition to tackling the problem of concurrency, the work that Craig’s team has done will also simplify the writing of distributed robotic applications through a technology called decentralized software services (DSS) ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … DSS enables developers to create applications in which the services ─ the parts of the program that read a sensor, say, or control a motor ─ operate as separate processes that can be orchestrated in much the same way that text, images and information from several servers are aggregated on a Web page. Because DSS allow software components to run in isolation from one another, if an individual component of a robot fails, it can be shut down and restarted ─ or even replaced ─ without having to reboot the machine. Combine with broadband wireless technology, this architecture makes it easy to monitor and adjust a robot form a remote location using a Web browser ... What is more, a DSS application controlling a robotic device does not have to reside entirely on the robot itself bun can be distributed across more than one computer. As a result, the robot can be a relatively inexpensive device that delegates complex processing tasks to the high-performance hardware found on today’s home PCs. I believe this advance will pave the way for an entirely new class of robots that are essentially mobile, wireless peripheral devices that tap into the power of Mobile, wireless peripheral devices that tap into the power of desktop PCs to handle processing-intensive tasks such as visual recognition and navigation ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … And because these devices can be networked together, we can expect to see the emergence of groups of robots that can work in concert to achieve goals such as mapping the seafloor or planting crops ... These technologies are a key part of Microsoft Robotics Studio, a new software development kit built by Tandy’s team. Microsoft Robotics Studio also includes tools that make it easier to create robotic applications using a wide range of programming language. One example is a simulation tool that lets robots builders test their applications in a three-dimensional virtual environment before trying them out in the real world. Our goal for this release is to create an affordable, open platform that allows robot developers to readily integrate hardware and software into their designs ... How soon will robots become part of our day-to-day lives? According to the International Federation of Robotics, about two million personal robots were in use around the world in 2004, and another seven million will be installed by 2008. In South Korea the Ministry of Information and Communication hopes to put a robot in every home there by 2013 ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … The Japanese Robot Association predicts that by 2025, the personal robot industry will be worth more than $50 billion a year worldwide, compared with about $5 billion today ... As with the PC industry in the 1970s, it is impossible to predict exactly what applications will drive this new industry. It seems quite likely, however, that robots will play an important role in providing physical assistance and even companionship for the elderly. Robotic devices will probably help people with disabilities get around and extend the strengths and endurance of soldiers, construction workers and medical professionals. Robots will maintain dangerous industrial machines, handle hazardous materials and monitor remote oil pipelines. They will enable health care workers to diagnose and treat patients who may be thousands of miles away, and they will be a central feature of security systems and search-and-rescue operations ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … Although a few of the robots of tomorrow may resemble the anthropomorphic devices seen in Stars Wars, most likely look nothing like the humanoid C-3PO. In fact, as mobile peripheral devices become more and more common, it may be increasingly difficult to say exactly what a robot is. Because the new machines will be so specialized and ubiquitous ─ and look so little like the two-legged automatons of science fiction ─ we so little like the two-legged automatons of science-fiction ─ we probably will not even call them robots. But as these devices become affordable to consumers, they could have just as profound an impact on the way we work, communicate, learn and entertain ourselves as the PC has had over the past 30 years ...” [211]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #6:

“...Because of the explosive nature of exponential growth, the twenty-first century will be equivalent to twenty thousand years of progress at today’s rate of progress; about one thousand times greater than the 20th century...” (The Singularity Is Near).

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #7:

President John F. Kennedy’s speech ─ on September 12, 1962 at Rice University ─ indicated: “...Despite the striking fact that most of the scientists that the world has ever known are alive and working today, despite the fact that this Nation’s own SCIENTIFIC MANPOWER IS DOUBLING EVERY 12 YEARS IN A RATE OF GROWTH MORE THAN THREE TIMES THAT OF OUR POPULATION AS A WHOLE, DESPITE THAT, THE VAST STRETCHES OF THE UNKNOWN AND THE UNANSWERED AND THE UNFINISHED STILL FAR OUTSTRIP OUR COLLECTIVE COMPREHENSION...” [80]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #8:

Max Planck (1858 – 1947) pointed out: “...A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die, and a new generation grows up that is familiar...” [187]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #9:

To further set the stage for this material, the textbook “...Einstein in the Boardroom...” by Suzanne S. Harrison and Patrick H. Sullivan Sr. may offer some lucid ideas on the “...current...” state of affairs when they claim:

“...Humans have been adding to their total knowledge steadily over the centuries, and the amount of knowledge we create is multiplying at an incredible rate. BEGINNING WITH THE AMOUNT OF KNOWLEDGE IN THE KNOWN WORLD AT THE TIME OF CHRIST, STUDIES HAVE ESTIMATED THAT THE FIRST DOUBLING OF THAT KNOWLEDGE TOOK PLACE ABOUT 1700 A.D. THE SECOND DOUBLING OCCURRED AROUND THE YEAR 1900. IT IS ESTIMATED TODAY THAT THE WORLD'S KNOWLEDGE BASE WILL DOUBLE AGAIN BY 2010 AND AGAIN AFTER THAT BY 2013...” [37]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #10:

H.G. Wells (Herbert George Wells ─ 21 September 1866 ─ 1946) observes: “... An immense and ever-increasing wealth of knowledge is scattered about the world today; knowledge that would probably suffice to solve all the mighty difficulties of our age but it is dispersed and unorganized. We need a sort of mental clearinghouse for the mind: a depot where knowledge and ideas are received, sorted, summarized, clarified and compared ...” [188]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #11:

There are many serious publications, from 2003 to this date, speaking of the entirety of scientific knowledge doubling every five (5) years and sooner. How, then, can one undertake such a gargantuan challenge, through the “...Society of Knowledge...” (that also embraces the “...infotech economy...”), unless it is through the stewardship of the most rigorous and advanced scientific method? [129]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #12:

Human knowledge capability will continue to double every year. “...Human knowledge capability...” is the quantity of available knowledge multiplied by the power of technology to process that knowledge. This capability will increase by two to the power of 100, the equivalent of a thousand billion billion, in the twenty-first century...” — James Martin, “...The 17 Great Challenges of the Twenty-First Century,...” Jan-Feb 2007, p. 24 [The Futurist Magazine’s Top-10 Forecast for 2010]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #13:

Ray Kurzweil sustains: “...[THERE IS A] DOUBLING EVERY TWO YEARS [REGARDING THE TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT OF] SOLAR ENERGY BY APPLYING NANOTECHNOLOGY TO SOLAR PANELS...” [177]. Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #14:

Is genetics and genomic making landmark progression to solve complicated challenges?

Ray Kurzweil comments: “...NANO-GENETIC SEQUENCING DATA … IS DOUBLING EVERY YEAR...” [177]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #15:

What has become of novel knowledge content manufacturing as of now?

Ray Kurzweil posits: “...KNOWLEDGE IS DOUBLING BY EVERY FOURTEEN MONTHS...” [177]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #16:

Is Moore's Law beginning to run out of steam? Does it represent the death of computer power?

Ray Kurzweil expresses: “...MORE THAN THE DOUBLING OF COMPUTATIONAL POWER [IS TAKING PLACE] EVERY YEAR...” [177]. Brackets are mine.

The more the advancement, the less the jobs for biologicals?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #17:

“...Alvin Toffler wrote in Future Shock (1970), “…The work has been cut by 50 percent since the turn of the century. It is not out of the way to predict that it will be slashed in half again by 2000 ..” [192]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #18:

China mulls $1.5 trillion strategic industries boost? How far can China go to pervasively cutting-edge science and technology while the West, seemingly and allegedly, does not get its act together? What does a prominent news agency have to report on it?

Reuters (Dec 03, 2010) noticed: “...China is considering investments of up to $1.5 trillion over five years in seven strategic industries, sources said, a plan aimed at accelerating the country's transition from the world's supplier of cheap goods to a leading purveyor of high-value technologies .... Analysts expressed skepticism at the sheer amount of money ─ it equates to about 5 percent of China's gross domestic product on an annual basis ─ but said that the eye-popping headline figure was an indication of the government's determination to catalyze a structural shift in the economy .... THE TARGETED SECTORS INCLUDE ALTERNATIVE ENERGY, BIOTECHNOLOGY, NEW-GENERATION INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, HIGH-END EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING, ADVANCED MATERIALS, ALTERNATIVE-FUEL CARS AND ENERGY-SAVING AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY TECHNOLOGIES ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #18 (continues:)

“ … Beijing has said before that it wants to promote the sectors, a policy that it hopes will make the country less dependent on low-end, dirty manufacturing. The value-added output of the seven strategic industries together account for about 2 percent of GDP now. The government has said it wants them to generate 8 percent of GDP in 2015 and 15 percent by 2020...” [176]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #19:

How does Futureketing argue about the linkage between our thoughts, the Multiverse and the forthcoming advent of the Technological Singularity?

“...Bart Simpson: ‘Dad, What is the mind? Is it just a system of impulses or something tangible? [Thinking better my question, Dad, Is the mind a projection of Computronium instilled into our brain? If so, Will my mind be superseded above and beyond by the Strong Artificial Intelligence devices embedded in the transbiologicals’ and robots’ own quantum CPUs?]’...” [187]

Transbiologicals are biologicals who have transcended their own biology.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #20:

Zillion impossible science facts turned into rampant realities today?

Dr. Michio Kaku, Ph.D. points out, “...As a physicist, I have learned that the ‘impossible’ is often a relative term .... IN MY OWN SHORT LIFETIME I HAVE SEEN THE SEEMINGLY IMPOSSIBLE BECOME ESTABLISHED SCIENTIFIC FACT OVER AND OVER AGAIN. So is it impossible to think we might one day be able to teleport ourselves from one place to another, or build a spaceship that will one day take us light-years to the stars? .... If we were to somehow encounter a civilization a million years more advanced than ours, would their everyday technology appear to be ‘magic’ to us? .... Just because something is ‘impossible’ today, will it remain impossible centuries or millions of years into the future? ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #20 (continues:)

“ … Given the remarkable advances in science in the past century, especially the creation of the quantum theory and general relativity, it is now possible to give rough estimates of when, if ever, some of these fantastic technologies may be realized. With the coming of even more advanced theories, such as string theory, even concepts bordering on science fiction, such as time travel and parallel universes, are now becoming re-evaluated by physicists. Think back 150 years to those technological advances that were declared ‘impossible’ by scientists at the time and that have now become part of our everyday lives. Jules Verne wrote a novel in 1863, Paris in the Twentieth Century, which was locked away and forgotten for over a century until it was accidentally discovered by his great-grandson and published for the first time in 1994. In it Verne predicted what Paris might look like in the year 1960. His novel was filled with technology that was clearly considered impossible in the nineteenth century, including fax machines, a world-wide communications network, glass skyscrapers, gas-powered automobiles, and high-speed elevated trains … Not surprisingly, Verne could make such stunningly accurate predictions because he was immersed in the world of science, picking the brains of scientists around him. A deep appreciation for the fundamentals of science allowed him to make such startling predictions ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #20 (continues:)

“ … IRONICALLY, THE SERIOUS STUDY OF THE IMPOSSIBLE HAS FREQUENTLY OPENED UP RICH AND ENTIRELY UNEXPECTED DOMAINS OF SCIENCE. For example, over the centuries the frustrating and futile search for a ‘perpetual motion machine’ led physicists to conclude that such a machine was impossible, forcing them to postulate the conservation of energy and the three laws of thermodynamics. Thus the futile search to build perpetual motion machines helped to open up the entirely new field of thermodynamics, which in part laid the foundation of the steam engine, the machine age, and modern industrial society .... We ignore the impossible at our peril. In the 1920s and 1930s Robert Goddard, the founder of modern rocketry, was the subject of intense criticism by those who thought that rockets could never travel in outer space. They sarcastically called his pursuit Goddard’s Folly. In 1921 the editors of the New York Times railed against Dr. Goddard’s work: ‘…Professor Goddard does not know the relation between action and reaction and the need to have something better than a vacuum against which to react. He seems to lack the basic knowledge ladled out daily in high schools...’ Rockets were impossible; the editors huffed, because there was no air to push against in outer space ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #20 (continues:)

“ … Sadly, one head of state did understand the implications of Goddard’s ‘impossible’ rockets ─ Adolph Hitler. During World War II, Germany’s barrage of impossibly advanced V-2 rockets rained death and destruction on London, almost bringing it to its knees .... Time and again we see that the study of the impossible has opened up entirely new vistas, pushing the boundaries of physics and chemistry and forcing scientists to redefine what they mean by ‘impossible.’ As Sir William Osler once said, ‘THE PHILOSOPHIES OF ONE AGE HAVE BECOME THE ABSURDITIES OF THE NEXT, AND THE FOOLISHNESS OF YESTERDAY HAS BECOME THE WISDOM OF TOMORROW.’ .... Many physicists subscribe to the famous dictum of T. H. White, who wrote in The Once and Future King, ‘Anything that is not forbidden is mandatory!’ In physics we find evidence of this all the time .... For example, cosmologist Stephen Hawking tried to prove that time travel was impossible by finding a new law of physics that would forbid it, which he called the ‘chronology protection conjecture.’ Unfortunately, after many years of hard work he was unable to prove this principle. In fact, to the contrary, physicists have now demonstrated that a law that prevents time travel is beyond our present-day mathematics ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #20 (continues:)

“ ...Today, because there is no law of physics preventing the existence of time machines, physicists have had to take their possibility very seriously .... Already one ‘impossible’ technology is now proving to be possible: the notion of teleportation (at least at the level of atoms). Even a few years ago physicists would have said that sending or beaming an object from one point to another violated the laws of quantum physics. The writers of the original Star Trek television series, in fact, were so stung by the criticism from physicists that they added ‘Heisenberg compensators’ to explain teleporters in order to address this flaw. Today, because of a recent breakthrough, physicists can teleport atoms across a room or photons under the Danube River...” [174] To read more on this citation, go to Amazon at http://amzn.to/dHGkOW

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Fruitfully planting towards which tense?

“...The heritage of the past is the seed that brings forth the harvest of the future...” ─ Inscription from statuary pedestal at National Archives in Washington

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #22:

Many forces are not predictable but some others are predictable based on applied omniscience, marshaled articulated on systems approach!

Yogi Berra remarks: “...Prediction is very hard, especially when it's about the future...” [171]

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In dealing with hard science, incidentally, is not right that less is more in the following lapidary axiom by Albert Einstein!

"…The grand aim of all science is to cover the greatest number of empirical facts by logical deduction from the smallest number of hypotheses or axioms..." [208]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #24:

Who creates the future and who doesn’t?

Michael Anissimov utters: “...One of the biggest flaws in the common conception of the future is that the future is something that happens to us, not something we create...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #25:

What are the ruthless drivers?

Harold Varmus, NIH Director, remarks: “...There are three great themes in science in the twentieth century ─ the atom, the computer, and the gene...” [171]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #26:

Interacting with the future?

Rainer Maria Rilke concluded: “...The future enters into us in order to transform itself in us long before it happens...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #27:

What to consider about gauging the future?

Wired (1994) pointed: “...The future belongs to neither the conduit or content players, but those who control the filtering, searching and sense-making tools we will rely on to navigate through the expansion of cyberspace...” [145]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #28:

Horses, dogs and robotic dominance of all?

Samuel Butler (1863 letter) indicates: “...Who will be man’s successor? To which the answer is: We are ourselves creating our own successors. Man will become to the machine what the horse and the dog are to man; the conclusion being that machines are, or are becoming, animate...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #29:

Brainy ones hyper-accelerating industries and beyond?

Juan Enriquez verbalizes: “... Meanwhile, lone individuals are birthing not just companies but entire industries that rapidly become bigger than the economies of most countries. But unlike growth industries of the past … cars and aerospace, for example … the industries that will dominate our future depend on just a few smart minds … Not a lot of manpower … So during a period of prosperity and economic growth … Wealth is ever more mobile and concentrated...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #30:

What is the current rate of change? What is the as-of-now rate of technological and scientific knowledge doubling?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #31:

Mark Miller, computer scientist, explains: “...You know, things are going to be really different … No, no, I mean really different...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #32:

What are we morphing into?

Sir Arthur C. Clarke observed: “...It’s also a tour de force of photography: the images reveal a whole new order of creation about to come into existence. No one who has any interest in the future can afford it...” [164]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #33:

The outcomes stemming of the intermixing of the exuberant technologies?

Juan Enriquez posits: “...You and your children are about to face a series of unprecedented moral, ethical, economic, and financial issues. The choices you make [as well as those you’re failing to make because of lack of detailed, advanced and deep awareness] will impact where you live, what you earn, what your grandchildren will look like, how long you live. It all starts because we are mixing apples, oranges, and floppy disks...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #34:

“...The future belongs to neither the conduit or content players, but those who control the filtering, searching and sense-making tools we will rely on to navigate through the expanses of cyberspace ...” [198]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #35:

From perennially upgraded knowledge into decisive, ruling empires?

Juan Enriquez claims: “...The knowledge revolution is taking place in small, sharply defined areas. One company generates more U.S. patents than 139 countries do together … This [revolution] generates new EMPIRES and new ghettos .... It slams into existing systems and destroys them while creating new systems. Countries and individuals can either surf new and powerful waves of change ─ or try to stop them and get crushed...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #36:

Shocking times equate to shocking futures?

Jose Ortega y Gasset stated: “...Life is a series of collisions with the future; it is not the sum of what we have been, but what we yearn to be...” [149]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #37:

Why everything changes, beginning with change itself?

Nicola Tesla, 1896, Inventor of Alternative Current, reasoned: “...I do not think there is any thrill that can go through the human heart like that felt by the inventor as he sees some creation of the brain unfolding to success...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #38:

Which one is the future of computing and science while the so-called present is undergoing mazes at the rhythm of increasing hypes?

Ray Kurzweil points: “...[IN THE NEAR FUTURE] COMPUTERS [WILL BE] DOING HARD SCIENCE...” [177] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #39:

Is the new paradigm changing to so many paradigms simultaneously resulting impossibles to figure out any paradigm correctly?

Juan Enriquez utters: “...Many people, even some of the heads of megacorporations, feel that the world is moving too fast as companies, even industries, disappear...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #40:

What are the brain’s priorities beyond seizing life-support capabilities for its own sustainability?

Michael Polanyi concludes: “...The mind is attracted by beautiful [and advanced] problems, promising beautiful [and useful solutions]...” [160]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #41:

Was the creation of the world explosive? How expansive does an on-going explosion become?

“... The world is seeing a Cambrian explosion of media usage ...” [198]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #42:

What has become of fate and destiny in times that neuroscience researchers are coming out with some PRELIMINARY outcomes that seem to suggest: “...The present is a function of the future...”?

Robert Theobald reasons: “...Our future is determined by the actions of all of us alive today. Our choices determine our destiny...” [160] Commentary: Some researchers in speaking of some very preliminary yet indicative findings ask: «...Is the present a function of the future?...»

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #43:

Which destiny is that?

William Jennings Bryan observes: “...Destiny is not a matter of chance ─ it is a matter of choice. It is not a thing to be waited for ─ it is a thing to be achieved...” [174]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #44:

What are the cosmological traits of this over-fragmented “...society...”? Certainly!

David Brin commented: “...What distinguishes society today is not only the pace of events, but also the nature of the tool kit for facing the future...” [160]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #45:

What are the origins of the future?

“...Do not presume that past success indicates future impregnability...” [154]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #46:

While at digital-driven world, Could one refer to Paradise as Computronium?

“...We all go from anticipation to anticipation. In cyberspace there always is room over the next ridge to build a new perspective of heaven ...” [198]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #47:

There is here a point of view about change (as change is partly explored here):

Adam Gordon established: “...We have seen eye-popping developments across society, technology, institutions, and products and services in the last generation; this will surely continue into the future .... if we decide today to launch a product, buy a house, study for a degree, build a new light rail system, or take any similar decision of significance, the environment of tomorrow will be a key factor in the success or failure of that decision .... Our decisions are only as good as the view of the future they rest on [profound understanding of all of the driving forces shaping and re-shaping the environment]. All opportunities and successes and profits are realized in the future. All threats, failures, and losses are realized in the future .... Either way, the earlier and clearer we see future circumstances, the better we will be able to benefit by changing our current recipes for success to keep up with the changes in the world. The better managers’ view of the future, the better their decisions will turn out to be ...” [102]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #48:

How does change and future interrelate?

Alvin Toffler asserts: “...Change is the process by which the future invades our lives...” [147]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #49:

Does the pursuit of progress beget ubiquitous robots?

“...We are hanging ears, ears and sensory organs on our computers and on our networks asking them to observe the physical world on our behalf and to manipulate it. The more you connect computers to the physical world, the more the issue of interaction becomes important ...” [198]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #50:

What can we do about the future if we have failed to do the proper and sensible things with the past and present?

“... That it is possible for us to anticipate actions, to predict the future, and, by looking for ways to change incentives, to engineer the future across a stunning range of considerations .... One of particular import is that the future ─ or at least its anticipation ─ can cause the past, perhaps even more often than the past causes the future .... must we change our base thinking to work out any variety of predictions and, especially, to change the future?...” [183]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #51:

How do we calculate the future?

“...In summary, the future is a phenomenon that will be completely real someday even though it does not exist today .... Even if the future is approximately equal to today, it will also differ dramatically from today in many particular ways...” [184]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #52:

We have gone ubiquitously digital and genetic and the consequences are unpronounceable even in orders of magnitude?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #53:

Juan Enriquez indicates: “...Digital code is what drives rapid speed growth today. It allows mergers like AOL Time Warner … It drives the Internet, TV, music, finance, IT, news coverage, research, manufacturing. A few countries and companies understood the change. That is how poor countries like Finland, Singapore, and Taiwan got so wealthy … So quickly … But a lot of folks just did not learn to read and write a new language … And even though they produced more and more goods, particularly commodities … And even though they restructured companies and governments … Cut budgets, raised taxes, built large factories and buildings … They got a lot poorer. (In 1938 the richest country per person in Asia was … the Philippines. In 1954, according to the World Bank, the most promising Asian economy was … Burma. Both remain commodity economies … Both are sidelined from the digital revolution … And you probably would not like to live in either country). Your world changed when you went ‘On Line.’ One day you used a fax or e-mail … And it soon became hard to conceive of living with only snail mail. If you understood this change early …”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #53 (continues:)

“ ... And invested or worked in some of the companies driving the digital revolution … You are probably quite well off … (as a country and/or as an individual). If you came late, as a speculator, without understanding what a digital language does, or does not do … You probably lost a lot of money during the year 2000. Your world … and your language … are about to change again. The two nucleotide base pairs that code all life …A-T, C-G … Have already led some of the world’s largest companies … Monsanto … DuPont … Novartis … IBM … Hoechst … Compaq … GlaxoSmithKline … To declare that their future lies in life science. They have abandoned, sold, spun off core business divisions … And launched themselves into selling completely new products … Which is why so many chemical, seed, cosmetic, food, pharmaceutical companies … Are partnering, Merging, Growing. Some life-science companies will crash spectacularly … Others will get larger than Microsoft and Cisco … (Companies that are already larger than the economies of most of the world’s countries.). The world’s mega-mergers are going to be driven by digital and genetic code. Consider what is about to happen to medicine. You currently spend about nine times as much for doctors and medical interventions...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #53 (continues:)

“... As you do on medicines and prevention. In the measure that we understand how viruses, bacteria, and our bodies are programmed … And how they can be reprogrammed … Treatment will shift from emergency interventions … Toward deliberate and personalized prevention … (Just as dentistry did.). And we may end up spending just as much on pharmaceuticals as we do on doctors. These medicines do not have to be pills or injections … They could be a part of the food you eat every day, your soap or cosmetics … Perhaps you will inhale them or simply put various patches on your skin. (This is why Procter & Gamble is thinking of merging with a pharmaceutical company, why L’Oreal is hiring molecular biologists, and why Campbell’s is selling soups designed for hospital patients with specific diseases.)...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #54:

Connect everything to everything else to further improve and expand an even more pervasive automation? Is automation also a term for increasing replacement of labor by humans?

“...When they really touch our lives, information systems cease to be information systems. They are media...” [198]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #55:

Dr. Marshall McLuhan, Ph.D. (1962) asserts: “...Our world tomorrow will be utterly different, in ways we cannot even conceive...” [175]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #56:

What hijacks what?

Dr. Stephen Covey writes: “...Again, yesterday holds tomorrow hostage .... Memory is past. It is finite. Vision is future. It is infinite. Vision is greater than history...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #57:

The consequences of a world going from round to flat?

Thomas Friedman claims: “...The flattening of the world is going to be hugely disruptive to both traditional and developed societies. The weak will fall further behind faster. The traditional will feel the force of modernization much more profoundly. The new will get turned into old quicker. The developed will be challenged by the underdeveloped much more profoundly. I worry, because so much political stability is built on economic stability, and economic stability is not going to be a feature of the flat world. Add it all up and you can see that the disruptions and going to come faster and harder. No one is immune ─ not me, not you, not Microsoft. WE ARE ENTERING AN ERA OF CREATIVE DESTRUCTION ON STEROIDS. Dealing with flatism is going to be a challenge of a whole new dimension even if your country has a strategy. But if you don’t have a strategy at all, well, again, you’ve warned...” [139]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #58:

Perpetually change or die?

Michael Gelb (1996) argues: “...Thirty-five years ago, psychologist and visionary Dr. Abraham Maslow warned, ‘life is moving far more rapidly now than ever before in the rate of growth of facts, knowledge, techniques, and inventions. We need a different kind of human being able to life in a world that changes perpetually, who has been educated to be comfortable with change and situations in which he has absolutely no forewarning. The society that can turn out those people will survive. Societies which do not will die.’...” [216]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #59:

Why this changed change is unprecedented and different? San Francisco futurist James Canton offers insight.

“...CIO Insight: In The Extreme Future, you say the 21st century is going to be lightning-fast, complex and driven by disruptive changes. But aren't we already in this extreme future? [RESPONDING THE QUESTION,] JAMES CANTON [INDICATES]: WE ARE TO A CERTAIN EXTENT. BUT THE POINT OF MY BOOK IS THAT THINGS ARE GOING TO GET EVEN MORE DISRUPTIVE, COMPLEX AND COMPETITIVE; THINGS ARE NOT GOING TO EASE OFF, THEY'RE ACTUALLY GOING TO ACCELERATE...” [138] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #60:

What are the organic properties of change and its impact?

David Schlesinger, global managing director at Reuters, indicates: “...Change is hard. Change is hardest on those caught by surprise. Change is hardest on those who have difficulty changing too. But change is natural; change is not new; change is important...” [139]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #61:

The universe and the morrow?

Isaac Asimov verbalizes: “...Humanity has the stars in its future, and that future is too important to be lost under the burden of juvenile folly and ignorant superstition...” [141]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #62:

Understanding the universe as we don’t think it is and as many people cannot align it with their belief system?

Dr. Carl Sagan, Ph.D., established: “...It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring...” [157]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #63:

Whose realities and myths are those?

Voltaire (1694 – 1778), French writer and philosopher, posited: “...Everything’s fine today, that is our illusion...” [157]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #64:

Is anyone exaggerating about the dynamics of change?

Ian Pearson observes: “...By mid-century, computers will be linked directly into our nervous systems via nanotechnology, which is so small it could connect every neuron in our brains. By about 2040, there will be a backup of our brains in a computer somewhere, so that when you die it won’t be a major career problem...” [140]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #65:

Question: Allegedly, To what extent is the world changing and what are some of the consequences, sometimes infamously ignored?

Dr. Stephen Covey commented: “...The world has profoundly changed … The challenges and complexity we face in our personal lives and relationships, in our families, in our professional lives, and in our organizations are of a different order of magnitude. In fact, many mark 1989 ─ the year we witnessed the fall of the Berlin Wall ─ as the beginning of the Information Age, the birth of a new reality, a sea change of incredible significance ─ truly a new era ─ Being effective as individuals and organizations is no longer merely an option ─ survival in today’s world requires it. But in order to thrive, innovate, excel, and lead in what Covey calls the new Knowledge Worker Age, we must build on and move beyond effectiveness [long-held assumptions, fallacies and flawed beliefs and faulty conventions]…Accessing the higher levels of human genius and motivation in today’s new reality REQUIRES A SEA CHANGE IN THINKING: a new mind-set, a new skill-set, a new tool-set ─ in short, a whole new habit...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #66:

Bringing down a handful of millenarian fallacies in the twentieth-one century?

Gregory S. Paul and Earl Cox argued: “...From Conventional Wisdom to Shocking Probability. Maybe someday, sooner or later, truly intelligent machines will be built. Until that time, speculation will abound. Much of that speculation is based on what might be called ‘Conventional Wisdom,’ the underlying assumptions and conventions we collectively share. We can list some of these assumptions as follows: The next century will be an extension of this one, with increasingly smarter machines being run by people and for people … Because the human mind is linked to a soul, cybernetic machines will never be fully self-aware like we are … If intelligent robots can be built, it will be a long time before they can be made to do what humans do, as well as humans do it. Perhaps centuries will be required … Even after intelligent robots are made, multitudes of humans will continue to exist on earth, and maybe even in space … Human minds and personal identities will never be able to merge with an electromechanical system … Even if it were possible, we humans would refuse to download our minds onto hardware, no matter how tempting and intelligent the new surroundings might be. We believe that cyberbeings will be emotionless, soulless, and humorless mechanical zombies ─ rather like ‘Star Trek’s’ Lt. Commander Data, a somewhat sad android pining for a humanity he will never achieve … No matter how smart they are, digital minds will never have the insight, intuition, and smooth savvy of the human mind. They will forever remain mentally inferior, and our faithful, self- maintaining servants...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #66 (continues:)

“ ...The robots will soon prove our mental and physical superiors. Self-generated enhancements will refine them beyond our control. They will enslave us all except, of course, for a renegade band of rebellious, young, good-looking, daring humans armed with battered, recycled surplus weapons, fearlessly following their craggy but wise leader into a fight for truth, justice, and the hominid way … THIS BOOK ARGUES THAT THE NEXT CENTURY WILL PROVE TO BE NOTHING LIKE THIS ONE, NOR ANY FORECAST SO FAR. COMPUTING POWER, NEUROSCIENCE, AND NANOTECHNOLOGIES ARE ADVANCING SO RAPIDLY THAT THEY WILL COMBINE TO PRODUCE THE MOST SIGNIFICANT EVOLUTIONARY DEVELOPMENTS SINCE THE ORIGIN OF LIFE ITSELF … WE MAINTAIN THAT THE HUMAN MIND AND CONSCIOUS THOUGHT ARE EXCLUSIVELY NATURAL AND PHYSICAL IN ORIGIN AND NATURE. ULTIMATELY, THEIR NATURES AND FUNDAMENTAL PROCESSES ARE KNOWABLE AND CAN BE REPLICATED FOR THE PURPOSES OF PERSONAL IMMORTALITY...” [169]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #67:

Pervasive genetics, pervasive medicine, pervasive diagnostics and pervasive monitoring?

Juan Enriquez explains: “...If it seems like your world has been topsy-turvy over the past few years … Consider what’s coming. Your genetic code will be imprinted on and ID card … For better and worse. Medicines will be tailored to your genes and will help prevent specific diseases for which you may be at risk. (But … your insurance company and your prospective employer may also find out that you are genetically disposed to, say, heart disease, or breast cancer, or Alzheimer’s.)...” [163]

Whatever the lethal consequences, Are you still doggedly insisting on not understanding the rates of hyper-geometrical exponential growth and hence not have a sense of proportions in alignment with the driving forces of the twentieth-one century?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #68:

James John Bell argues, “...We won’t just experience 100 years of progress in the twenty-first century ─ it will be more like 20,000 years of progress...” [161]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #69:

How can we get to a new terra incognita with an old map?

Rowan Gibson postulates: “...The lesson of the last three decades is that nobody can drive to the future on cruise control...” [161]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #70:

Where and how do we live?

Gregory S. Paul and Earl Cox observed: “...We live in strange times, in case you have not noticed. Here we are with our home computers and other high-tech appliances, living what we regard as a normal life … The world we are living in ─ a world that couples Homo sapiens with fast-paced hypertechnology ─ is strange to us because sometimes it feels like what it is, a transient dream .... We are dreaming a strange, waking dream; an inevitably brief interlude sandwiched between the long age of low-tech humanity on the one hand, and the age of human beings transcended on the other. We are living in the latter days of humanity; cybertechnologies will quickly replace us. Just inches of time away exists a speedy reality bearing down on us that we may sense, but do not show on our faces .... While one may be made uncomfortable by the thought of a truly strange 21st century, there is around us an impending sense of arrival ─ a strangeness in the air, an uneasiness, a feeling that deep down, things are starting to cchange in swift, fundamental ways too fuzzy to put a finger on. More than just the onset of the third millennium, it is the quiet before the storm. The products of technology are becoming more curious ─ a little too smart, a little too fast. It’s downright unsettling. And, hey, people aren’t dumb. They know that we have just begun to build smart dumb machines; soon it will be dumb smart machines. Where will it stop? If we continue to build machines smarter than the last ones, and then one that is smarter than that and so on ─ well, you do not have to be a particle physicist to see that the machines cannot keep getting smarter and smarter, yet forever remain dumber than us. Garry ‘John Henry’ Kasparov, chess Grand Master, lost a championship game to a machine for the first time in history this year. Perhaps someday, we’ll hear the battle cry of humanity rallying in desperation: ‘Remember Deep Blue’...” [165]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #71:

Technologies, societies and possibilities?

Freeman Dyson claimed: “...There is nothing so big nor so crazy that one out of a million technological societies may not feel itself driven to do, provided it is physically possible...” [174]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #72:

Minds vs. computational algorithms, man-made computational algorithms?

“...Funny thing, our mind. The moment our software catches up, the mind seems to travel beyond the capability of the software .... [However,] Our minds focus on renditions, darling, not the underlying algorithm. Your analysts and programmers have to deal with algorithm that produces new renditions...” [161] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #73:

Dr. Covey’s lucid perspective becomes greatly supported and refined by Peter Drucker.

Peter Drucker asserted: “...In a few hundred years, when the story of our [current] time is written from a long-term perspective, it is likely that the most important event those historians will see is not technology, not the Internet, not e-commerce [not ‘social media’ ─ so-called]. IT IS AN UNPRECEDENTED CHANGE IN THE HUMAN CONDITION. FOR THE FIRST TIME ─ LITERALLY ─ SUBSTANTIAL AND GROWING NUMBERS OF PEOPLE HAVE CHOICES. FOR THE FIRST TIME, THEY WILL HAVE TO MANAGE THEMSELVES. AND SOCIETY IS TOTALLY UNPREPARED FOR IT...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #74:

And the political angle of the future? By The Honorable Tom Ridge, First Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and Former Governor of Pennsylvania:

“...The political world promises change and the digital world delivers it. And when that change potentially affects our privacy and freedom, we should all pay attention. This is a fascinating, provocative and thoroughly readable look into an uncertain future...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #75:
Internet and yesterday?

Scout Bradner writes: “...We have the Internet that we have today because the Internet of yesterday did not focus on the today of yesterday...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #76:

The rights and the future?

“...Legal scholars can debate whether copyright law mandates a future of ‘authorized use only’ for digital information. The answer may not matter much, because that future is coming to pass through the technologies of digital rights management and trusted systems...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #77:

Future and forces embedded?

“...The forces shaping your future are digital, and you need to understand them...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #78:

Can we picture the future?

“...Will the vast amounts of information now available because of the advances in storage and communication technology actually be usable a hundred or a thousand years in the future, or WILL THE SHIFT FROM PAPER TO DIGITAL MEDIA MEAN THE LOSS OF HISTORY?...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #79:

Regarding the Cyberspace, a primer to Computronium?

John Perry Barlow: “...Governments of the Industrial World, your weary giants of flesh and steel, I come from Cyberspace, the new home of Mind. On behalf of the future, I ask you of the past to leave us alone. You have no so sovereignty where we gather .... We are creating a world that all may enter without privilege or prejudice accorded by race, economic power, military force, or station of birth. We are creating a world where anyone, anywhere may express his or her beliefs, no matter how singular, without fear of being coerced into silence or conformity … In our world, all the sentiments and expressions of humanity, from debasing to the angelic, are parts of a seamless whole, the global conversation of bits .... [Y]ou are trying to ward off the virus of liberty by erecting guard posts at the frontiers of Cyberspace...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #80:

Can we use a chain to represent a metaphor about the future?

“...You can’t understand the knot without understanding the strands, but in the future, the strands need not remain tied up in the same way as they are today...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #81:

Are there others angles to be added to the compounded perspective under discernment about changed changes?

Ray Kurzweil: “...Supercomputers will achieve one human brain capacity by 2010, and personal computers will do so by about 2020 .... We appear to be programmed with the idea that there are 'things' outside of our self, and some are conscious, and some are not .... We are beginning to see intimations of this in the implantation of computer devices into the human body...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #82:
The world is not analogue anymore. Its quality is only digital and hence emphatically over-mathematical. Ergo, if you don’t attach the future, the future will attack you and outsmart you without a fail.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #83:

Supporting the motions of all of the above in this digital universe of ours, check out the take by the author of “...The World is Flat...”

Thomas Friedman indicates: “...People are always [and wrongfully] assuming that everything that is going to be invented must have been invented already. But it hasn’t...” [139] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #84:

What happens to your vision when you don’t understand that the world is not analog but pervasively ─ increasingly so ─ over-digital?

Muhamad Yunus: “...There eyes were blinded by the knowledge they had...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #85:

Brainy discoveries and the IT revolution?

J. G. Taylor, B. Horowitz, K. J. Friston: “...Now, for the first time, we are observing the brain at work in a global manner with such clarity that we should be able to discover the overall programs behind its magnificent powers...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #86:

From Darwin and well into the present twentieth-one century?

Gregory S. Paul and Earl Cox: “...When Queen Victoria was in her prime, an Englishman, Charles Darwin, discovered a fundamental truth that shook mankind so severely that it remains today a matter of extreme distress and massive denial. Darwin realized that life on our planet is not the recent and fixed product of deity-mediated special creation, but has been constantly changing over a long span of time … The paleontologist who followed Darwin have taught us that time has no respect for species. Whole dynasties of life have been swept away and replaced with new ones. More than 65 million years ago, the world was filled with swift, deadly meat-eaters, including huge tyrannosaurs stalking elephant-sized horned dinosaurs and duck-billed herbivores. Flying pterosaurs were as big and heavy as sailplanes. Small, graceful, predaceous dinosaurs had binocular vision, big brains, and grasping hands. After 170 million years of successful evolution, they achieved the height of variation and power. Resplendent and numerous on the fertile Cretaceous plains, how could it be that within a few years they all would be gone forever? ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #86 (continues:)

“ ...This chilling story suggests a ticking clock for humanity, as well; dare we think of our own extinction? There is ticking clock for humanity, and it may be mere seconds before midnight. TOMORROW IS UPON US, AND WHAT IS ABOUT TO HAPPEN IN THE NEW DAY IS FAR, FAR STRANGER THAN MOST PEOPLE DARE TO THINK … Even Darwin did not realize how right he was, or how far evolution will take us. We should not fault Darwin for his lack of vision. Darwin lived in a time when the modern scientific revolution was just beginning. It was also a time of steam engines, gas lamps, and phrenology. Science, in our late 20th century sense, was still a few years away. Yet even today, few nonscientists have more than an inkling of how life evolved or how technologies such as the automobile, the light switch, or the airplane actually work … WE LIVE IN A HIGH-TECHNOLOGY WORLD, WITH LITTLE APPRECIATION FOR HOW THINGS GOT THE WAY THEY ARE...” [169]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #87:

What is the personal cosmology in the orbit of a person seeking foresight? You capture foresight to construe a cohesive vision, Do you not?

Antonio Machado: “...Man, incurable futurist, is the only traditionalist animal...” [130]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #88:

The name of the game and the point-of-inflection change of game-changers?

“...Which way will the future go? Science fiction authors seem to favor dystopian futures over utopian ones, probably because they make for more interesting plots. BUT SO FAR, AI SEEMS TO FIT IN WITH OTHER REVOLUTIONARY TECHNOLOGIES (PRINTING, PLUMBING, AIR TRAVEL, TELEPHONY) WHOSE NEGATIVE REPERCUSSIONS ARE OUTWEIGHED BY THEIR POSITIVE ASPECTS...” [192]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #89:

A technological and academic institution outsmarting cutting-edge science and technology to a point to generate more wealth than the combination of many countries?

Juan Enriquez: “...Wealth is concentrated and portable. MIT faculty and alumni produce as much wealth as all but Twenty-Two Countries In The World...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #90:

Before we proceed any further, please always remember the following maxim.

“...Everything is somewhat somewhat interrelated to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat connected to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat interconnected to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat intricate to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat involved in everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat inter-associated to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat interlocked to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat inter-coupled to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat inter-joined to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat conjoint to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat inter-tied to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat interdependent to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat correlated to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat intertwined with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat inter-meshed with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat implicated in everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat entangled with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat entwined with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat tangled with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat knotted with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat interwoven into everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat engaged with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat parenthetical to everything else....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #91:

Einstein has an appropriate thought to share: “... [The human being] experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest — a kind of optical delusion of our consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty...” [108] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #92:

Preterit notions to secure being strategically devastated?

Peter Drucker expressed: “...The greatest danger in times of turbulence is not the turbulence; it is to act with yesterday’s logic...” [146]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #93:

What do Alvin and Heidi Toffler can tell us about the 2025’s outlook through Toffler Associates’ assessing?

Toffler Associates posit: “...Yet the opportunities and challenges do not pause. The forces of change are in fact accelerating as technology, communications, and mobility link us in a blurring and buzzing globalizing world.... The image of this future became clearer when we and 40 executives and thought leaders closely examined five specific technology areas and explored their implications for society, business, and government. We examined biotechnology, cyber-technology, nanotechnology, ubiquitous sensing, and wild cards from science and technology. We asked the thought leaders to apply their projections in five crosscutting areas to identify the key technology convergences that would most affect or disrupt society in 2025: economy and wealth, energy and the environment, health and demographics, infrastructure, and governance ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #93 (continues:)

“... We learned that the technologies were changing in ways that made traditional distinctions between disciplines and areas of science decreasingly relevant. Biotechnologists regularly describe nano-scale developments. Nanotechnologists apply insights from genome sequencing. Research is spread, enhanced, and stolen with cyber tools. Research will lead to carbon-free or carbon-neutral technologies that disrupt industries and policies. The blurring of boundaries between sciences are creating convergences. Breakthroughs across disciplines are stimulating accelerating insights and applications...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #94:

As concluding this important report, Toffler Associates argue:

“...Knowledge is being created at such a rate that much of what we know will soon be obsolete .... The technological developments maturing between now and 2025 and the innovative ways they may be applied reflect an acceleration and shift that can seem both promising and challenging to decision makers. In the Industrial Age, developments in steam power, combustion engines, automobiles, aerospace, and telephony seemed slow to mature – their development and spread required large industrial infrastructures. In the Information Age, developments in bio, nano, cyber, and sensors are possible with a smaller and more differentiated infrastructure, and they are occurring simultaneously around the globe. Global information networks are increasing the pace of this technological innovation. This deeper, more widely spread development of knowledge is different from our recent past and portends further changes...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #94 (continues:)

“ ...The convergences of bio, nano, cyber, sensors and wild card technologies are causing even greater acceleration of change. But at the same time, knowledge is being created at such a rate that much of what we know about these technologies and their application rapidly becomes obsolete as it is overtaken by newer discoveries. Our institutions will be challenged to respond to the combination of these technological changes and the many other drivers of change simultaneously. We expect many systems and institutions to be desynchronized by these changes and efforts to resynchronize them will add to the sense of disruption that many people feel .... Many thought leaders we worked with in this effort are highly optimistic. Nearly all who contributed to these findings see technological developments as promising, and as stimuli for new opportunities. At the same time, some cautioned about vulnerabilities and called for leadership and action to address these vulnerabilities before we feel their impact. This report serves as one input to decision makers who can aid us in adapting with the changes and creating our future...” [150]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #95:

The Perpetual Innovation Imperative and Enterprises Impacted by Continuous Change?

“... In the mid-1980s a study by Shell suggested that the average corporate survival rate for large company was about half as long as that of a human being. Since then the pressures on firms have increased enormously from all directions ─ with the inevitable result that business life expectancy is reduced still further. Many studies look at the changing composition of key indices and draw attention to the demise of what were often major firms and in their time key innovators. For example, Foster and Kaplan point out that of the 500 companies originally making up the Standard & Poor 500 list in 1957, only 74 remained on the list through to 1977. Of the top 12 companies which make up the Dow Jones Index in 1900 only one ─ General Electric ─ survives today. Even apparently robust giants like IBM, GM or Kodak can suddenly display worrying sings of mortality, whilst for small firms the picture is often considerably worse since they lack the protection of a large resource base ... Some firms have had to change dramatically to stay in business. For example, a company founded in the early nineteenth century, which had Wellington boots and toilet paper amongst its product range, is now one of the largest and most successful in the world of telecommunications business. Nokia began life as a lumber company, making the equipment and supplies needed to cut down forests in Finland...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #95 (continues:)

“...It moved through into paper and from there into the ‘paperless office’ world of IT ─ and from there into mobile telephones ... Another mobile phone player ─ Vodafone Airtouch ─ grew to its huge size by merging with a firm called Mannesmann which, since its birth in 1870s, has been more commonly associated with the invention and production of steel tubes! TUI owns Thomsom (the travel group) in the UK, and is the largest European travel and tourism services company. Its origins, however, lie in the mines of old Prussia where it was established as a public sector state lead mining and smelting company!...” [197]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #96:

How does a global corporation spell out century 21st-century leadership to the world?

J. W. Marriott, Jr., Chairman and CEO, Marriott International, Inc.: “...Great leaders know and appreciate the value of people. They don’t just listen to the opinions of others, they seek them out. They make sure every member of their team has the opportunity to make a meaningful, lasting contribution. They recognize that their most important responsibility as a leader is to develop their people, give them room to grow and inspire them to realize their full potential. This has long been our philosophy at Marriott, where we believe that if we take great care of our associates, they will take care of our customers...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #97:

Becoming acculturated in mind preparedness by a supreme statesman!

Winston Churchill: “...To every man there comes in his lifetime that special moment when he is figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered a chance to do a very special thing, unique to him and fitted to his talents. What a tragedy if that moment finds him unprepared or unqualified for the work which would be his finest hour...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #98:

The Intelligence Community on Trends?

National Intelligence Council (NIC): “...If you like where events seem to be headed, you may want to take timely action to preserve their positive trajectory. If you do not like where they appear to be going, you will have to develop and implement policies to change their trajectory...” [144]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #99:

The rosy facts about life?

Alvin Toffler claims: “...Change is not merely necessary to life ─ it is life...” [148]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #100:

To further illustrate the impact of downside change, What was The World Trade Center Disaster and Recovery Planning about?

“...On September 11, 2001, two airplanes flew into the World Trade Center (WTC), killing more than 2000 people. All WTC offices were destroyed and many nearby buildings were badly damaged and immediately evacuated. Beyond the loss of human lives, major jammed due to the obvious increased phone activity. In addition, major telecommunication providers such as AT&T and Verizon lost major portion of services because their major switching centers and computer systems were located in areas near the WTC. This impacted several major clients, including Lufthansa Airlines which lost telephone services for its sales offices in downtown Manhattan. Lufthansa had chosen AT&T as its primary and Verizon as a backup provider. With both facilities impacted, Lufthansa was left without a telephone service for almost a week...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #99 (continues:)

“....Many companies that relied on the Internet to conduct business were not severely impacted. In fact, the Internet became a viable alternate vehicle for communications in that disastrous week. In my own office in New Jersey that afternoon, we could not get the news from TVs (no TVs were available in the offices), so we all visited the news sites from CNN, FOX and others to understand what was going on. Internet telephony and email became the primary source of communicating with family and friends to let them know that we were OK .... Merrill Lynch had over 9,000 employees at the WTC and the nearby World Financial Center. Most were unharmed and were relocated to other places of work quickly and successfully. Merrill resumed its business later in the same day and did not suffer as much as others. The main reason was that it had redundant telecommunications capabilities and a good disaster recovery plan. Merrill had rehearsed the plan four months earlier, so it was better prepared for a disaster than others. The plan included priorities for business activities, so that high priorities activities could be brought online quicker. It also included detailed procedures for restoring critical applications with procedures that included necessary technologies, personnel, and facilities for a quick restoration in case of a disaster. Logistics were also in place for transportation of personnel and equipment, with provisions for housing and feeding employees for up to 8 weeks. This disaster recovery plan went into action within minutes after the incident and Merrill was operational later that day...” [189]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #100:

Never predicting, just formulating endless, savvy scenarios?

Dr. James A. Ogilvy, Ph.D.: “...Because time is real, and the future unpredictable, the challenge of carving a path into the future calls for a different way of thinking than the old, mechanical methods of strategic planning. In order to anticipate wholly new industries like the personal computer industry, it’s not enough to make predictions based on old assumptions. You need to imagine alternative scenarios based on new assumptions. You need to imagine alternative scenarios based on new assumptions. Those new assumptions need more than new numbers...” [162]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #101:

Can one make technological growth for good?

Gordon E. Moore: “...No exponential is forever … but we can delay ‘forever’...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #102:

Which come preeminently first?

The undersigned and the present material’s author indicated:‭ “...If the PRESENT is a function of the FUTURE, Does the FUTURE, accordingly, elicit in the PRESENT?...” [129]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #103:

In a world of counter-intuitiveness, What does it take to advance your enterprise to a forward position?

“...‘A slow sort of country’ said the Red Queen. ‘Now where, you see, it takes all the running you can do to keep in the same place. IF YOU WANT TO GET SOMEWHERE ELSE, YOU MUST RUN AT LEAST TWICE AS FAST AS THAT!...” (Lewis Carroll, Alice through the Looking Glass) [197]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #104:

How does time elapse?

[Dame (Cicely) Veronica Wedgwood] C.V. Wedgwood (July/20/1910 – March/09/1997) observed:

“...History is lived forwards but it is written in retrospect. We know the end before we consider the beginning and we can never wholly recapture what it was to know the beginning only...” [217]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #105:

The clever problem-solving pathway?

Eliezer S. Yudkowsky indicated: “...Our sole responsibility is to produce something smarter than we are; any problems beyond that are not ours to solve ... [T]here are not hard problems, only problems that are hard to a certain level of intelligence. Move the bit upwards [in level of intelligence], and some problems will suddenly move from ‘impossible’ to ‘obvious.’ Move a substantial degree upwards, and all of them will become obvious...” [142] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #106:

From transgenic crops into vital vaccines?

Juan Enriquez: “...The skin and pulp of the orange that sits on your desk … Is just packing … What matters is the code contained in the seeds. Each seed has a long string of gene data that looks like … The seed guides growth, how a tree and its leaves develop … The size, flavor, color, shape of fruits. If you can read the code … And rewrite it … You can turn an orange into a vaccine, a contraceptive, a polyester. Each of these things has already been done in corn. Today, bananas and potatoes can vaccinate you against things like cholera, hepatitis, [and] diarrhea. You can harvest bulletproof fibers … Grow medicines in tobacco. And it’s not just apples, oranges, and corn that are rapidly becoming different organisms .... Mosquitoes are flying hypodermic needles. They can infect you with malaria, dengue, and other awful things. They do so by transferring a little bit of genetic code through their saliva … Into your bloodstream … Which then reprograms part of the way your cells operate … By changing your genetic code ever so slightly … In ways that can make you very sick. So why not engineer mosquito genes so that they have the opposite effect? If mosquito saliva contained antibodies .... Or if you made it hard for malaria to mutate inside a mosquito’s body … You could immunize people and animals … By making sure they were bitten. Because the language of genes (A, T, C, G) is the same for all creatures … You can mix species. If you are an artist, the genes that make jellyfish fluoresce at night … Can be used to make a bunny glow under black light. If you are an M.D., the same genes can be placed in monkeys to serve as markers … Which help identify cures for diseases like Alzheimer’s and cancer...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #107:

In speaking of sense of direction, Frank Kafka argues: “...There are some things one can only achieve by a deliberate leap in the opposite direction. One has to go abroad in order to find the home one has lost...” [126]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #108:

Can we get a hindsight in reversal, please, now?

Walter Adolf Gropius (1883 – 1969) stated, “...Let’s wish, let’s imagine, let’s build together the new construction of the future...” [130]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #109:

Success via being well-informed and even-though information is not knowledge?

Peter L. Bernstein: “...The information you have is not the information you want. The information you want is not the information you need. The information you need is not the information you can obtain. The information you can obtain costs more than you want to pay...” [127]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #110:

In speaking of Chinese spiritual leaders in times of antiquity, a sage told his disciples, “...Attempt not to live in difficult times; those are the interesting ones indeed...” [129]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #111:

In China of antiquity there used to be some wise words — as per some spiritual leaders — along these lines: “...The first fifty years are to learn. The next fifty years are to labor...” [129]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #112:

The undersigned and the present material’s author indicated: “...Declare the past, recover yesterday, analyze the present, enjoy today, and conceive and reinvent tomorrow...” [129]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #113:

What about how we construe our thinking? Let’s see Ambrose Bierce’s take on it: “...[Brain is,] an apparatus with which we think that we think...” [130] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #114:

R. Buckminster Fuller established: “...If humanity does not opt for integrity we are through completely. It is absolutely touch and go. Each one of us could make the difference...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #115:

Recalling that this material is about the impact and the points of inflections fostered by many modes of change and to the utter end of spoken-of change, John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid make the following claim:

“...Technological and social systems shape each other … technologies — such as gunpowder, the printing press, the railroad, the telegraph and the Internet — can shape society in profound ways. But on the other hand, social systems — in the form of governments, the courts and informal organizations, social movements, professional networks, local communities, market institutions and so forth — shape, moderate and redirect the raw power of technologies...” [56]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #116:

For this rate of change, What else are you going to need?

George Horace Lorimer (attributed to): “...You've got to get up every morning with determination if you're going to go to bed with satisfaction...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #117:

Mind, Evolution and Universe?

As Princeton physicist Freeman Dyson put it: “...Mind, through the long course of biological evolution, has established itself a moving force in our little corner of the universe. Here on this small planet, mind has infiltrated matter and has taken control. It appears to me the tendency of mind to infiltrate and control matter is a law of nature...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #118:

Evolution and change?

Carl Sagan: “...Two billion years ago, our ancestors were microbes; a half-billion years ago, fish; a hundred million years ago, something like mice; ten million years ago, arboreal apes; and a million years ago, proto-humans puzzling the taming of fire. Our evolutionary lineage is marked by mastery of change. IN OUR TIME, THE PACE IS QUICKENING...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #119:

Machines and humans playing the mice-cats hunting game?

Rodney Brooks: “...Our machines will become much more like us, and we will become much more like our machines...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #120:

Is the Economy under what pressures?

“...Since 1995, the year in which the new economy based on information technology began to boom, the revenues have not been proportional to productivity and, during the last five years, the gap between income and productivity has been dramatic. Between 1995 and 2006 the productivity growth per employee superseded employees’ actual wages in 340%. Between 2001 and 2006, the first six years of George H. Bush’s presidency, this gap further deepened in an alarming 779%....” [58]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #121:

How Do We Behave In Front Of Inflicting-Points Change?

“...'...Our surroundings (the context in which we live) define the ease we conduct our daily lives. As human beings, we look for normalcy in our lives. We try to extrapolate the future by looking at the immediate past. We don't like when the rules of the game change...'...Unfortunately for those who don't like change, the context of our lives is in a state of constant rearrangement .... Diane suggests that all of us have something to learn about our interrelationships around the globe: '...If one theme should resonate from September 11th, it is that the lives of our children are desperately dependent upon how children around the world view their own fates...'....” [204]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #122:

The Ever-Quickening Pace!

Dr. James Canton, Ph.D. argues: “...If you were to disappear and come back after 90 days, the Net would have doubled, bandwidth would have increased by a third, and there would be a half a dozen innovations you have missed...” [205]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #123:

On the pace and mode of contemporary change, Peter Cochrane, BT’s former visionary head of research (subsequently cofounder of The Concept Lab), observes:

“...When we move toward the world of the bit we encounter a new world of multiple dimensions. This world is a network of n-dimensional space, of multiple copies, existence, connectivity, locations and form. Information can be simultaneously distributed or clustered, singular or plural, static or dynamical, living or dead, past or present, real-time or warped, accelerate or delayed...” [201]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #124:

What precludes you from being lucid as per Twentieth-One Century ?

Arthur Scopenhaur: “...Everyone takes the limits of his own vision for the limits of the world...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #125:

Fuzzy-logic discernment and counter-intuitiveness must take into consideration many pathways among many others, including those by Buddhism.

For instance, Kalu Rinpoche establishes:

“...We live in illusion and the appearance of things. There is a reality. We are that reality. When we understand this, we see that we are nothing. And being nothing, we are everything. That is all...” [68]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #126:

What is dynamical and what is permanent indeed?

Heraclitus — Greek Philosopher (c.540 — c. 480 BC) stated: “...No man ever steps into the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same men...” [105]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #127:

And a westerner’s view on wisdom. Theodore Roosevelt: “...Nine-tenths of our wisdom consists in being wise timely...” [119]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #128:

Reality, Mind and Buddhism by a Westerner’s View!

A citation on Gary Hamel’s Leading The Revolution book: “...Alan Kay tells a wonderful little story about how he came to recognize this deep truth: On the third day of a conference at a Buddhist center, I asked people why they put their palms together several times a day. The Buddhists believe that the world is an illusion, but we have to go along with the illusion for efficiency reasons. When they put their hands together it is a semicolon, an acknowledgment that whatever they may think is going on right now is largely a fabrication of their own mind...” [88]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #129:

World and vision?

“...When the world and the mind are both transparent, this is true vision that which doesn’t exist doesn’t exist in relation to that which exists. This is true vision. By means of such vision nothing is seen and nothing is not seen .... The mind and the world are opposites, and vision arises when they meet. When your mind doesn’t stir inside, the world doesn’t arise outside. When the world and mind are both transparent, this is true vision. And such understanding is true understanding...” By Bodhidharma, Indian Zen Buddhist monk who brought Zen from India to China (circa 520 A.D.) [89]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #130:

Courage and success by the prominent British premier.

Winston Churchill argued, “...Courage is the capacity to go from failure to failure with increased enthusiasm!...” [111] If we really wish to make a substantial difference, we’re going to need this personal cosmological trait lavishly I am not afraid to assert.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #131:

Succeeding in reversal?

Piet Hein: “...The road to wisdom? Well, it’s plain and simple to express. Err and err and err again but less and less and less...” [89]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #132:

A distant past and also a distant future, right here?

Edward Fredkin (born 1934): “...A third implication of the concept is that because the vast preponderance of the lifetime of the universe lies in the distant future rather than in the past, the historical achievements of life and mind are meager foreshadowings of the starring role that intelligent life is likely to play in shaping the future of the cosmos. Indeed, this new way of looking at the intimate linkage of life, mind, and the cosmos suggests a novel way of thinking about the ultimate destiny of our destiny of our universe...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #133:

How does a psychologist conceive the past-present-future interrelationship?

Dr. Philip Zimbardo, Ph.D., “...Consider any decision you had to make recently: Do I keep working or go out to play; take one more drink before driving home; take a chance and cheat on my taxes or an exam; practice safe sex or just do it; resistor gives into temptation? As you contemplate what you will do, you are influenced by a number of factors. For some people, the world is limited to all the forces they perceive in their immediately present situation, their biological urges, their social setting and that which others are doing or urging them to do, and the sensuous appeal of the stimulus itself. Those folks who usually limit their decision-making be referring only to the current circumstances are Present-oriented. Other people making a decision in the same setting downplay the present and search their memories for similar past situations; they recall what they did in the past and how these decisions turned out. These folks are Past-oriented. Finally, a third type of person makes up her or his mind entirely based on imagined future consequences — the costs and benefits — of an action. If anticipated costs outweigh anticipated benefits or gains, they won’t go forward. They only go forward when they expect gains to predominance…”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #133 (continues:)

“....The ideal time profile is a balance of being high on the past-positive, moderately high on the present-hedonistic and future, and low on the past-negative and present-fatalistic times perspectives .... In other words, conscientious people regularly think about future consequences before making a decision … I believe present transcendence and future hopefulness are essential components of a successful therapeutic intervention .... Our goal is to help you reclaim yesterday, enjoy today, and master tomorrow. To do so, we’ll give you new ways of seeing and working with your past, present, and future ...” [105]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #134:

Rowan Gibson in Rethinking the Future observes:

“...For a long time we have known deep down that the future will be different from the past. Every science fiction writer, from Jules Verne to William Gibson, has reminded us of that. But we have stubbornly refused to believe is that the future will be different than we expect it to be. Most of us anticipate ... But why? ... This is a simple question, that has been asked since man first began to ponder. The good news is that we now have answers to this question, thanks to emergence of the complexity science. In fact, we not only gain insights for the why, but also, on how we can gain leverage on such unreliable change...” [201]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #135:

Complexity growing more complex in an ever-faster paced world?

Chris Harris contends, “...Yet, it is with these new possibilities that come equally great challenges; and it is important to understand what these new challenges mean ... To begin with, it means greater complexity in terms of the design work and diversity of technologies and skills needed to realize such composite invention. It also means effectively managing this new magnitude of complexity at a faster pace ... It means that the linear business world we have come to know so well, that unfolds in a fairly predictable manner, quickly falls to new markets that form in discontinuities, sometimes unrecognizable patterns; where technologies that appear overnight bleed into unknown applications, then become obsolete as abruptly as they came; where competitors from remote industries that you thought unlikely to enter your market, totally redefine and take over your most valuable sector...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #135 (continues:)

“ … It means that today's events move along so fast they have little bearing on the outcomes of tomorrow; where cumulative and hard-earned experience accounts for less, and where new, quite radical ways of thinking provide for the future ... It means a time in which best practice and procedure have not yet been set or written, where rapid learning and expansive knowledge oversee the rules of the game, and where foresight and imagination become the predominant forces for competition ... And most significant of all, it means that the kinds of interconnection we make between known and unknown ideas become the engine for economic growth, whether for an individual, local enterprise or global institution ... All told, this new era brings with it the utmost sweeping threats, yet the most wide-based opportunities the business world has yet seen...” [201]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #136:

DNA, complexity and digital information system?

Edward Fredkin (bio at http://bit.ly/bMVDlb) described his theory in an interview with science writer Robert Wright: “...What I’m saying is that at the most basic level of complexity an information process runs what we think of as physics. At the much higher level of complexity life, DNA — you know, the biochemical functions — are controlled by a digital information system. Then, at another level, our thought processes are basically information processing...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #137:

Universe with a purpose?

Robert Wright (bio at http://bit.ly/azFvZG), in response to Fredkin, puts it: “...Fredkin believes that the universe is very literally a computer and that it is being used by someone, or something, to solve a problem. It sounds like a good news/bad joke: the good news is that our lives have purpose; the bad news is that their purpose is to help some remote hacker pi to nine jillion decimal places...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #138:

The artificial man?

The philosopher Thomas Hobbes (bio at http://bit.ly/5vaI4) offered an uncanny preview of the science of artificial intelligence in his masterpiece Leviathan [description viewable at http://bit.ly/16Qymw] published in 1651: “...Nature (the Art whereby God hath made and governs the World) is by the Art of man, as in many other things, so in this also imitated, that it can make an Artificial Animal. For seeing life is but a motion of Limbs, the beginning whereof is in the principal part within; why we not say that all Automata (Engines that move themselves by springs and wheels as doth a watch) have an artificial life?...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #139:

Is there some sort of highest-order entity regulating us?

David Jay Brown asked a medic, “...What is your perspective on the concept of God and how spirituality played a role in your view of medicine?...” Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum, M.D. responded: “...If everything is God, Goddess, Spirit — whether you want to call it — it’s all one. It’s all connected, and that means that all that’s going on is God looking at God’s self. So it’s all simply different perspectives, and that’s a fascinating thing. That means nobody is cut off from God, whether they are atheists or whatever. You don’t have to believe in God for Spirit to love you and be present, so it means that nobody is right and nobody is wrong. It’s all simply different perspectives, which is very freeing, because you don’t have to battle anybody. You just have to do your own thing .... This also allows us to recognize our own connection to spirit, which is very healing, because it allows that energy to flow into us, and allows us to stay whole and connected. So that’s a very powerful thing. I mean, my whole life is about Spirit and about God, or Goddess. To think of God as only a man sounds like an insult to God. It’s pretty limiting because God is everything. It also means that nothing and no one is better or worse than anybody else. And there’s this critical thing that happens, because that’s the touchstone through much of my life — to recognize I am equal of all beings, and no one is lesser than me. That means there’s nobody that I meet that’s better than I am, or that I’m better than them. We’re all different perspectives of God. We’re all equal, and we’re all divine, everybody...” [107]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #140:

Taking care of oneself to make the difference?

Descartes: “...I think therefore I am...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #141:

Space, evolution and universe?

Cosmologist Frank Tipler (bio at http://bit.ly/cmsdLs) has bluntly stated: “...Almost all of space and time lies in the future. By focusing attention only on the past and present, science has ignored almost all of reality, it is about time science decided to study the future evolution of the universe...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #142:

History and approaching a singularity?

Information theorist John von Nuemann (bio at http://bit.ly/2zfuto) in the 1950s: “...The ever accelerating progress of technology … gives the appearance of approaching some essential singularity in the history of the race beyond which human affairs, as we known them, could not continue...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #143:

Locating the Technological Singularity’s domicile?

Michael Anissimov: “...When the first transhuman intelligence is created and launches itself into recursive self-improvement, a fundamental discontinuity is likely to occur, the likes of which I can’t even begin to predict...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #144:

Ray Kurzweil and the Staggering Secret? (2010)

“...That was Kurzweil's real secret, and back in 1965 nobody guessed it. Maybe not even him, not yet. But now, 46 years later, Kurzweil believes that we're approaching a moment when COMPUTERS WILL BECOME INTELLIGENT, AND NOT JUST INTELLIGENT BUT MORE INTELLIGENT THAN HUMANS. WHEN THAT HAPPENS, HUMANITY — OUR BODIES, OUR MINDS, OUR CIVILIZATION — WILL BE COMPLETELY AND IRREVERSIBLY TRANSFORMED. He (Ray Kurzweil) believes that THIS MOMENT IS NOT ONLY INEVITABLE BUT IMMINENT. ACCORDING TO HIS CALCULATIONS, THE END OF HUMAN CIVILIZATION AS WE KNOW IT IS ABOUT 35 YEARS AWAY...” [213] Parentheses are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #145:

What should we find out — with maximum rigor — in history?

William Churchill: “...The further backward you look, the further forward you can see...” [104]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #146:

The geometrically non-linear human progress!

Ray Kurzweil indicates, “...Von Neumann makes two important observations here: acceleration and singularity. The first idea is that human progress is exponential … rather than linear .... The second is that exponential growth is seductive, starting out slowly and virtually in-noticeably, but beyond the knee of the curve it turns explosive and profoundly transformative. The intelligence that will emerge [post-Singularity] will continue to represent the human civilization. In other words, future machines will be human, even if they are not biological. This will be the next step in evolution, the next high-level paradigm shift .... Most of the intelligence of our civilization will ultimately be nonbiological. By the end of this century, it will be trillions of trillions of times more powerful than [un-enhanced] human intelligence...” [86] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #147:

If we fail to commit to development and research of proper science and technology are we enslaving ourselves?

“...A bitter controversy concerning whether humanity should build godlike massively intelligent machines .... [Dr. Kevin Warwick, Ph.D. literally argues:] humanity will have to confront the prospect of being replaced by a new dominant species, namely, ultra intelligent robots controlled by ultra intelligent artificial brains … ‘Cyborgians’ are people who look to technically upgrade their bodies to become ‘cyborgs,’ i.e. part machine, part human … I hope that by enhancing ourselves, we humans can have our cake and eat it too by achieving the dream of attaining the godlike abilities that Hugo [de Garis, Ph.D.] talks about by converting ourselves … without having to pay the cost of a major war. In a sense I am looking at a sort of compromise ─ rather than having ultra intelligent artificial brains acting against humanity, we join with them .... I sincerely hope it will not come to this sort of end game in the real world. Hugo’s scenario of a major war late this century, in which billions of people die, due to the use of advanced 21st century weaponry, is extremely depressing, and I firmly hope he is wrong, dead wrong, for the sake of humanity’s (and cyborgian) survival .... Hugo’s reasoning is frighteningly persuasive, even though my viscera reject what he is saying. The fact that he is pioneering the new field of ‘artificial brains’ only increases the credibility of his vision. If anyone in the world is in a good position to predict the future impact of advanced artificial brains on humanity, it must be Hugo .... If many decades into the future, Hugo is proven to be correct in saying that ‘the species dominance issue will dominate our global politics this century,’ then he will have become one of the major thinkers of the 21st century. With no offense to Hugo, I hope that he will be shown to have been wrong, to be shown to have exaggerated, and overreacted; because if not, the fate that he is suggesting will befall our grandchildren, is too horrible to grasp fully for all humanity, what he would call ‘gigadeath!’...” [179] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #148:

What about the Technology 25 Years Hence?

New York Times, as of December 28, 2010, pertaining to Ray Kurzweil’s arguments:

“...If you plot the basic measures of the price to performance and capacity of information technologies (for example, computer instructions per second per constant dollar, bits of memory per dollar, or the total number of bits being moved around over the Internet), they follow remarkably smooth — and foreseeable — trajectories. This observation goes well beyond Moore’s Law (which says you can place twice as many transistors on an integrated circuit every two years); in the case of computation, it goes back to the 1890 American census, long before Gordon Moore was even born .... What’s predictable is that these measures grow exponentially, not linearly, though our intuition about the future is linear, which is hard-wired in our brains. This makes a remarkable difference. Thirty steps linearly gets you to 30, whereas 30 steps exponentially (2, 4, 8, 16. . .) gets you to a billion .... And it’s not just electronics and communications that follow this exponential course. It applies as well to health, medicine and its related field of biology. The Human Genome Project, for instance, saw the amount of genetic sequencing double and the cost of sequencing per base pair come down by half each year .... A computer that fit inside a building when I was a student now fits in my pocket, and is a thousand times more powerful despite being a million times less expensive .... In another quarter century, that capability will fit inside a red blood cell and will again be a billion times more powerful per dollar...” [185]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #149:

Cambrian explosion and the future?

James N. Gardner: “...It should never be clear that the future will differ radically from the past; it will be at least different as the radically new world of biological complexity and diversity ushered in the Cambrian Explosion was from the preceding era .... The central point is that collateral advances in sciences seemingly far removed from cosmology can help dissipate the intellectual limitations imposed by common sense and naïve human intuition. And, in an uncanny reprise of the Lyell/Darwin intellectual synergy, it is a realization of the vastness of time and history that gives rise to the crucial insight. Only in this instance, the vastness of which I speak is the vastness of future time and future history...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #150:

Which common sense is that? Does it have the gold seal by Einstein?

Marvin Minsky: “...Common sense is not a simple thing [given that is not a definition but a truth-seeking process]. Instead, it is an immense society of hard-earned practical ideas ─ of multitudes of life-learned rules and exceptions, dispositions and tendencies, balances and checks...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #151:

Past, future, and baby universes?

University of Chicago cosmologist Sean Carroll: “...The [observed] arrow of time in our [observed] universe is puzzling because the fundamental laws of physics themselves are symmetric and don’t seem to discriminate between the past and future .... In our patch of the cosmos, time just so happens to be moving forward because of its initial low entropy, but there are others where this is not the case. The far past and the far future are filled with these other baby universes, and they would each think that the other had its arrow of time backwards. Time’s arrow isn’t a basic aspect of the universe as a whole, just a hallmark of the little bit we see...” [86] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #151:

The Largest Book! Which one is it? Is it the largest book or one of the sub-largest books?

Galileo ascertained, “...Philosophy is written in this grand book — I mean the Universe — which stands continually open to our gaze. But the book cannot be understood unless one first learns to comprehend the language and read the characters in which it is written...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #152:

Niels Bohr, Nobel Prize-winning physicist: “...The opposite of a false statement is a correct statement. The opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth...” [89]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #153:

Counter-seeing in order to discover?

Andre Gide (1869 – 1951) signaled, “...Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #154:

The influence to bias understanding?

Upton Sinclair: “...It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #155:

How does history relate to consciousness?

Jacob Burckhardt, attributed to, (1818 – 1897): “...History is nature’s disruption caused by the awakening of consciousness...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #156:

Who is your teacher that is not outside of your own self?

Brian Tracy: “...No one lives long enough to learn everything they need to learn starting from scratch. To be successful, we absolutely, positively have to find people who have already paid the price to learn the things that we need to learn to achieve our goals...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #157:

Relatives and absolutes?

Sir Winston Churchill: “...The era of procrastination, of half-measures, of soothing and baffling expedients, of delays, is coming to a close. In its place, we are entering a period of consequences ...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #158:

What is the fundamental practical methodology towards root motivations under systemic and systematic yet empirical approach as it was observed by William Hazlitt?

“...Science is the desire to know the causes...” [210]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #159:

It's impossible to run enterprises without the grounds and basis to apply in action!

Einstein: “...Our theories determine what we measure...” [116]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #160:

Improbabilities working on behalf of the learned?

Louis Pasteur: “...Chance favors the prepared mind ...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #161:

Science and spirituality?

Albert Einstein proclaimed, “...I hold that the cosmic religious feeling is the strongest motive in fostering scientific research...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #162:

You’re your own leader?

Mother Teresa: “... Do not wait for leaders; do it alone, person to person ...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #163:

From happiness to useful service?

Henry Ford (1863 – 1947), “...Wealth, like happiness, is never attained when sought after directly. It comes as a by-product of providing a useful service...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #164:

Is that a reasonable optimistic person?

Dr. Kathleen Jennison Goonan, M.D. established: “...Yesterday’s options are gone...” [91]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #165:

A Wealth Of Future, Whether You Board It Or Not?

Alvin Toffler points out, “...The future is being colonized all the time by people who have the resources, who do spend time thinking about it, planning for it and trying to shape it in their direction...” [206]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #166:

Dimensional minds?

Oliver Wendell Holmes offers perspective: “...A mind, once stretched by a new idea, never regains its original dimensions...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #167:

Credit and predictions?

Louis V Gerstner, Jr. Former CEO, IBM observed, “... No credit can be given for predicting rain — only for building arks ...” [143]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #168:

Knowing Not Knowing?

Donald Rumsfeld established, “...As we know, there are known knowns. There are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns. That is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns, the ones we don’t know we don’t know...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #169:

Building a bridge?

Author Unknown, “.....If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door [you create pre-conditions for and by you]...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #170:

Perpetually upping the mind?

Albert Einstein sentenced, “...The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #171:

How do you distribute modernity?

William Gibson, “...The FUTURE is already here; it’s just not evenly distributed...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #172:

Orders misunderstood?

Henry Miller declared: “...Confusion is a word we have invented for an order which is not [yet] understood...” [111] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #173:

Progress and crime?

Albert Einstein commented, “...Technological progress is like an ax in the hands of a pathological criminal...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #174:

What stays in place?

Christian Bovee: “...When all else is lost, the future still remains...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #175:

Fearing what?

Thomas Fuller reasons, “...He that fears the future may enjoy the present...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #176:

Calling the Future what?

Tennessee Williams, “...The future is called ‘perhaps,’ which is the only possible thing to call the future. And the important thing is not to allow that to scare you...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #177:

Having or not having a tempo?

James Petersen: “...If you afraid for your future, you don’t have a present...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #178:

Which evil is the least worst?

Francesco Guicciardini: “...To relinquish a present good through apprehension of a future evil is in most instances unwise … from a fear which may afterward turn out groundless, you lost the good that lay within your grasp....” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #179:

Handy futures?

Thomas E. Dewey, “...We need not be afraid of the future, for the future will be in our hands...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #180:

Fearing change?

E. H. Harriman, “...It is never safe to look into the future with eyes of fear...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #181:

Anxious and miserable?

Marcus Annaes Seneca argues, “...The mind that is anxious about the future is miserable...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #182:

A heart and a fear?

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: “...Go forth to meet the shadowy Future without fear and with a manly heart...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #183:

Is the mind wrongly operated?

John Locke, “...Fear is an uneasiness of the mind, upon the thought of a future evil likely to befall us...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #184:

Uncertainties over certainty?

William Sloane Coffin: “...I’m deglitched that the future is unsure. That’s the way it should be...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #185:

What is the objective?

Clinical leader Dr. Kathleen Jennison Goonan, M.D., “...The goal here [in the beginning of the third millennium] is to understand the enablers [the driving forces out of which some futurists comfortably depict ‘trends’ — so-called —] for change [potential upsides] as well as the barriers [imminent downsides]...” [91] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #186:

Is the future meant to be bold?

Alfred North Whitehead, “...It is the business of the future to be dangerous...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #187:

What purpose to set out for?

Robert M. Pirsig, “...To live only for some future goal is shallow. It’s the sides of the mountain that sustain life, not the top...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #188:

The advantageous mind?

Samuel Johnson, “...Present opportunities are neglected, and attainable good is slighted, by minds busied in extensive ranges and intent upon future advantages...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #189:

The mind-hand connection?

B. C. Forbes, “...Our future and our fate lie in our wills more than in our hands, for our hands are but the instruments of our wills...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #190:

Determining the future?

Gerald Jampolsky, “...No way exists in the present to accurately determine the future effect of the least of our actions...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #191:

Are you recalling the future?

Corrie ten Boom, “...Memories are the key not to the past, but to the future...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #192:

Aching lessons to learn?

Hugh White: “.....When you make a mistake, don’t look back at it long. Take the reason of the thing into your mind, and then look forward. Mistakes are lessons of wisdom. The past cannot be changed. The future is yet in your power...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #193:

Imaginary Present and a Fabricated Future?

“...The part of Eternity with some small fraction of which we have a slight and regrettable acquaintance. A moving line called the Present parts it from an imaginary period known as the Future. These two grand divisions of Eternity, of which the one is continually effacing the other, are entirely unlike. The one is dark with sorrow and disappointment, the other bright with prosperity and joy .... Yet the Past is the Future of yesterday, the Future is the Past of to-morrow. They are one — the knowledge and the dream...” [72]

A fightable time?

William E. Gladstone (1809 — 1898), “...You cannot fight against the future. Time is on our side...” [72]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #194:

What are you inventing?

Alan Kay designates (1940 - ), “...The best way to predict the future is to invent it...” [72]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #195:

How far can ever-progressing and ever-diverting changed changes take us?

Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881, Russian novelist) describes, “...But dost thou know what will be tomorrow?...” [168]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #196:

Change to change what or not to be changed into which?

Milan Kundera (1929 - ) pronounces, “...The only reason people want to be masters of the future is to change the past...” [72]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #197:

Dreaming progress and modernity?

Eleanor Roosevelt utters, “...The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams...” [73]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #198:

De-learning and un-learning for Life?

Alvin Toffler indicates, “...In the world of the future, the new illiterate will be the person who has not learned to learn...” [73]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #199:

Guiding to which place?

Albert Einstein established, “... Teachers are messengers from the past and an escort to the future ...” [73]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 200:

Geography allocated by times?

Alison Lurie (1926 - ) stated, “...As one went to Europe to see the living past, so one must visit Southern California to see the future...” [74]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 201:

History and the train?

Dwight David Eisenhower (1890 — 1969), “...Neither a wise man nor a brave man lies down on the tracks of history to wait for the train of the future to run over him...” [75]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 202:

Imprudence?

Tacitus observed, “...Light-minded men are improvident of the future ... ...” [76]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 203:

Youth and future?

Franklyn Delano Roosevelt: “...We cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future....” [77]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 204:

Forgiveness and future?

Paul Boese, “...Forgiveness does not change the past, but it does enlarge the future....” [77]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 205:

Pencil your map?

Jon Bon Jovi, “...Map out your future, but do it in pencil...” [77]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 206:

Even with the advent of Big Data, Is everyone ready for quantitative analysis and for the beloved algorithms?

“...The desirable use for numbers is long. Yet very few on that list are feasible. ANYTHING INVOLVING HUMAN BEHAVIOR IS SUFFICIENTLY COMPLEX THAT A DISCRETE NUMBER CANNOT BE TIED TO IT...” [99] (ISBN-13: 978-0135511107).

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 207:

Future and responsibility?

George Bernard Shaw, “...We are made wise not by the recollection of our past, but by the responsibility for our future...” [77]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 208:

Future and humankind?

Richard P. Feynman, “...We are at the very beginning of time for the human race. It is not unreasonable that we grapple with problems. But there are tens of thousands of years in the future. Our responsibility is to do what we can, learn what we can, improve the solutions, and pass them on...” [121]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 209:

Time and definitions?

Charles Caleb Colton, “...Time is the most indefinable yet paradoxical of things; the past is gone, the future is not to come, and the present becomes the past even while we attempt to define it, and, like the flash of lightning, at once exists and expires...” [77]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 210:

One of the most important French-Canadian premiers, to this end, makes an awesome quotation. Canadian Premier Pierre Trudeau (1919 — 2000):

“...The twentieth century really belongs to those who will build it ... The future can be promised to no one...” [70]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 211:

Albert Einstein hence indicates, “...It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer...” [61]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 212:

What are we?

William Shakespeare, “...We know what we are, but know not what we may be [in the future]...” [142] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 213:

As it was communicated to TIME in 2010, What is the time-line predicted for a maximum technological convergence, emergence, and technological singularity?

“... At 2045, in that year, he (Kurzweil) estimates, given the vast increases in computing power and the vast reductions in the cost of same, the quantity of artificial intelligence created will be about a billion times the sum of all the human intelligence that exists today...” [213] Parentheses are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 214:

Machines harnessing the monopoly of pervasive intelligence?

Irving John Good: “...Let an ultraintelligent machine be defined as a machine that can surpass all the intellectual activities of any man however clever. Since the design of machines is one of these intellectual activities, an ultraintelligent machine could design even better machines; there would then unquestionably be an ‘intelligence explosion,’ and the intelligence of man would be left far behind. Thus the first ultraintelligent machine is the last invention that man need ever make...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 215:

Will humans be subjects to monarchical bots?

Peter Menzel and Faith D’Aluisio, “...Around the world, scientists and engineers are participating in a high-stakes race to build the first intelligent robot. Many robots already exist ─ automobile factories are full of them. But the new generation of robots will be something else: smart machines that act ever more like living creatures .... What will happen then? With our prosthetic limbs, titanium hips, and artificial eyes, we are already beginning to resemble our machines. And when we implant chips in our bodies to connect ourselves directly to computers, the likeness will become only more pronounced. Science fiction will have become science fact ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 215 (continues):

“ … Meanwhile ─ and equally important ─ our machines are beginning to resemble us. Robotic spiders, crabs, geckos, and dogs are already spilling from the laboratories. The next steps are to re-create Homo sapiens itself and then go beyond. Robots can already walk, talk, and dance; they can react to human facial expressions and obey verbal commands. When scientists go on to create fully autonomous robots with greater intelligence than human beings, will they be our partners or our rivals? Will it be a simply a robotic revolution or a true extension of evolution? Could machines and humankind meld into a single species─Robo sapiens?...” [164]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 216:

Either through flesh or silicon intelligence will be immensely augmented, surpassing human intelligence?

"...Take the question of whether computers can replicate the biochemical complexity of an organic brain. Kurzweil yields no ground there whatsoever. HE DOES NOT SEE ANY FUNDAMENTAL DIFFERENCE BETWEEN FLESH AND SILICON THAT WOULD PREVENT THE LATTER FROM THINKING. He defies biologists to come up with a neurological mechanism that could not be modeled or at least matched in power and flexibility by software running on a computer. He refuses to fall on his knees before the mystery of the human brain. 'Generally speaking,' he says, 'the core of a disagreement I'll have with a critic is, they'll say, Oh, Kurzweil is underestimating the complexity of reverse-engineering of the human brain or the complexity of biology. But I don't believe I'm underestimating the challenge. I THINK THEY'RE UNDERESTIMATING THE POWER OF EXPONENTIAL GROWTH.'..." [213]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 217:

For those seeking that — regardless of complexity — linking points between machines and humans, an English mathematician has a word of reflection.

Alan Turing postulates, “...A computer would deserve to be called intelligent if it could deceive a human into believing that it was human...” [100]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 218:

Has the fluid impact of change been understood by the establishment (so-called)?

“... There was a new complex future emerging ─ an extreme future of disruptions, risks, threats, and perhaps, new opportunities ─ that no one, not even our leaders, fully understood ...” [182]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 219:

What are we going to do with our customary system of belief, ethos and Weltanschauung?

Abraham Lincoln (1809 – 1865, 16th President of the U.S.) pointed out, “...The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 220:

Alvin Toffler offers some insight, “.....The FUTURE always comes too fast and in the wrong order [expected by the great majority of mindful or absent/minded ‘incumbents’]...” [17] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 221:

In a continuous dialogue about massive change, Toffler adds:

Alvin Toffler (1928 - ): “...‘Future Shock’ … the shattering stress and disorientation that we induce in individuals by subjecting them to too much change in too short a time … The dizzying disorientation brought on by premature arrival of the future ...” [17]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 222:

Must we subject ourselves to the most heterodox conventions in order to prevail?

Alexis de Tocqueville, “...Events can move from the impossible to the inevitable without ever stopping at the probable...” [181]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 223:

Albert Einstein indicates, “...If at first an idea does not sound absurd, then there is no hope for it...” [167]

“...Clouds are not spheres, mountains are no cones, coastlines are not circles, and bark is not smooth, nor does lightning travel in a straight line...” [214]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 224:

Dr. Aubrey de Grey Ph.D., a leading-edge scientist at the University of Cambridge in England, states it, “...We'll be solving problems before they arrive...” [59] Quite a future-ready declaration, Is it not?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 225:

What are the ultimate choices of us?

Juan Enriquez: “...We are the beginning to acquire … direct and deliberate control … over the evolution of all life forms … ON THE PLANET … Including ourselves....” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 226:

Are we out-smarting ourselves?

Stephen M. R. Covey: “...And capabilities are particularly essential in today’s changing economy, where technology and globalization are outdating skill-sets faster than ever before. The half-life of our current knowledge and skills is much shorter that it has ever been, and suddenly someone who was very competent and even had a great track record in yesterday’s world may no longer be competent in today’s world ...” [196]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 227:

From Nation States To Networks!

John Naisbitt observes: “...For many years the mindset has been that the global economy will be dominated by huge multinational companies. And that's turned out not to be the case. In fact, we have to re-examine our vocabulary and our definition of what multinational means .... I have a company called Megatrends Ltd., and we have 57 joint ventures in 42 countries, and we have only four employees including myself. We outsource everything. Well, almost everything. So I'm a multinational company. I must be, obviously, because I'm in 42 countries. But I'm not big. I'm small .... In other words, the world multinational has a new meaning. And if we say that the global economy will be dominated by multinationals in the new sense, then there is some truth to it. But if we mean it in the old way, that these huge global companies will control everything, that couldn't be more wrong .... What I think is really important is that there's a new kind of bigness. And that's big networks, rather than big mainframes. This is the metaphor I use .... I remember in my kitchen in Telluride, Colorado and watching CNN. It was the G7 were meeting in Naples for the economic summit. And I saw the leaders of these seven great industrial nations talking to each other, it struck me that this is a bunch of mainframes talking to each other in a PC world. It's part of the whole irrelevance of the G7, and by the twenty-first century I think I will be totally out the window ─ it just doesn't make sense any more .... We no longer live in a world of big mainframes. We live in a world where the real power is in big networks. By big networks, I mean a lot of individuals networked together. And, by definition, a network doesn't have any headquarters. For a network to work, everyone has to feel that they are in the center. That's when it's really powerful .... The only huge company that I know of that's really done this is Asea Brown Boveri. If you listen to Percy Barnevick, he says: '…We grow all the time, but we also shrink all the time...' The network gets larger but the nodes get smaller...” [203]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 228:

Among other concurrent methodologies, one can see the future early on via Churchillian prescription!

Winston Churchill: “...The further backward you look, the further forward you can see...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 229:

Reinforcing this position had been Confucius for centuries: “...If a man gives not thought about what is distant, he will find sorrow near at hand...” [103]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 230:

“...Einstein was once asked what the difference was between him and the average person. He said that if you asked the average person to find a needle in a haystack, the person would stop when he or she found a needle. He, on other hand, would tear through the entire haystack looking for all the possible needles ...” [134]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 231:

Why should we manage problems way in advance before and thoroughly they get out control?

Dwight D. Eisenhower: “...All plans fall at first contact with the enemy [competing situations, including and beginning those of and by change, as well as those unplanned for] ...” [123] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 232:

Dr. Vernon Grose, D.Sc. argues: “...It would be hard to find anyone who believes that losses occur without any cause. Yet many managers, acting as though an accident is a random stroke of fate, have to be reminded to seek and remove causes prior to a loss. Less obvious to the layman is the idea that nearly all accidental losses have a multiple causes: virtually no accident has a single cause .... Identifying causes, especially those that are subtle or unseen, requires tenacity, imagination, and a systematic method. However, since almost every accident or loss has a known precedent, you never have to start your search for causes empty-handed...” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 233:

And Dr. Grose further indicates: “...A primer on the development, application, and requirement of ‘systems thinking’ to obtain an ordered, global management perspective — a critical need if historical risk management is to be translated [in advance] from reaction into prevention of risk [many call risks “...problems...”] .... The systems approach is godlike — at least in perspective. It aims to look at any situation with OMNISCIENCE — TOTALITY OF KNOWLEDGE .... Of course, it never succeeds because of human limitations. But the goal remains. And such goal is essential if risk is to be managed effectively. Every possible risk must be considered before systematic management of risk can occur. If this seems grandiose, it isn’t meant to be. In failing to take such a lofty and all-encompassing view, managers are vulnerable to being blind-sided by an overlooked risk while believing that they have everything under control....” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 234:

Adding insights in line with the theme treated and emergency preparedness and business continuity before and after extreme hazards, there are valuable reflections by Dr. Collins.

Dr. Robert A. Collins, Ph.D. : “...Disasters are a natural and predictable part of the human condition. This includes both natural disasters and human-made disasters. In spite of this, whenever a disaster strikes, most people are unprepared. The inevitable result is the loss of life and property. It does not have to be this way .... SINCE DISASTERS ARE AN INEVITABLE PART OF LIFE, THE WISEST COURSE OF ACTION IS TO UNDERSTAND THEM, PREPARE FOR THEM, AND CAPITALIZE ON THE OPPORTUNITIES THAT THEY PRESENT. The first and most important step in disaster planning is, obviously, to have a plan. Without a specific plan, it will be very difficult, if not impossible, to implement the other steps in disaster preparation. Most organizations deal with disasters by first hoping that they don’t happen. Then when they do happen, they respond to them and try to recover from them. MOST ORGANIZATIONS DO NOT TRY TO MITIGATE THEM IN ADVANCE. THIS IS AN IRRATIONAL AND EXPENSIVE STRATEGY .... It is impossible to plan for things that you cannot imagine. Therefore, the first step in forging the resilient organization is to conduct ‘scenario planning’ .... It is necessary for the organization to be honest with itself when completing the scenario planning step in disaster preparation. THE TASK HERE IS NOT TO IMAGINE THE WORST DISASTER THAT THE ORGANIZATION THINKS THAT IT CAN HANDLE. THE TASK IS TO IMAGINE THE WORST DISASTER THAT COULD POSSIBLE STRIKE THE COMPANY, GIVEN ITS GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION AND INDIVIDUAL CIRCUMSTANCES. Lee Clarke, a disaster planning expert and professor at Rutgers University argues, ‘IT’S NOT CRAZY TO THINK ABOUT THE WORST CASES [IN ADVANCE]’ ...” [124]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 235:

An example of disruption-potential and post-‘risk management’?

“...You may remember the situation in 1982 when seven people in the U.S. died from ingesting Tylenol that had been laced with cyanide. The nation panicked. Some predicted that Johnson & Johnson would never be able to sell another product under that name. But Johnson & Johnson took responsibility for the situation. They immediately alerted consumers to stop using Tylenol until they could determine the extent of the tampering. They recalled approximately 31 million bottles of Tylenol, retailing at more than $100 million. They offered to exchange all Tylenol capsules that had already been purchased for Tylenol tablets, which cost them millions more. They established relations with law enforcement officers on every level to help search for the person who laced the medication and to help prevent further tampering. They put up a reward of $100,000 for the person who committed the crime. When they reintroduced the product back in the market, it had new triple-seal, tamper-resistant packaging. As a result of their actions, they turned what could have been a disaster into a victory in credibility and public trust ...” [196]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 236:

Can we take advantage of risk and benefit management with immense forethought and never in expensive hindsight?

“...Journalist Geoffrey Colvin (2005) argues: '…The events that do the worst damage are the one no even conceived of … The idea that a passenger jet might crash into the World Trade Center had been thought of; it was a fairly obvious possibility, especially since a plane once crashed into the Empire State Building. What no one imagined was the combination of large planes with nearly full fuel tanks plus the impact of the crashes jarring fireproofing from the girders, and how this could bring the towers down. In retrospect, it obviously could have been imagined. I’ just wasn’t'...” [124]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 237:

If we based our decision-making on intuitiveness and hunches, we will never get it right. We can just admit we are inundated with complexity, identify it, establish countermeasures against it and strategy to finally get our benefits in a sustained and rational way.

How are these speedy and somewhat dramatic times shaping and re-shaping us?

“...Journalist Amy Bernstein (2006) point out: ‘…Few issues have morphed as dramatically in the last five year as corporate resilience. That phrase once refereed to managing risks that were fairly predictable and relatively easy to insure against: fires, strikes, and economic recessions for example. But all that has changed. A string of catastrophes — beginning with the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, and continuing through the bombing of the Madrid railway and the Asian Tsunami in 2004, the blast on the London Underground in July 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in August and September, and the earthquake that devastated Pakistan in October 2005 — has rearranged our concept of disaster preparedness. It’s no longer enough for companies to devise a business continuity plan and file it away somewhere. THEY NOW HAVE TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO BOUNCE BACK FROM THE UNTHINKABLE.’...” [124]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 238:

What are the relevant considerations that we insist on ignoring beyond any irresponsibility?

“...Yossi Sheffi, Professor of Systems Engineering at MIT, conducted a three year study of resilient organizations from Toyota to UPS to the US Navy, and drew a simple conclusion: A COMPANY’S ABILITY TO RETURN TO BUSINESS DEPENDS MORE ON THE DECISIONS IT MAKES BEFORE A SHOCK HITS THAN THOSE IT MAKES DURING OR AFTER THE EVENT… According to Sheffi, the terrorist attacks of 9/11 forced him and his colleagues to see a more comprehensive view of risk. He states: ‘Before that, I thought about it mostly in financial terms — buying insurance against various business risks, buying commodity futures such as oil to hedge against price fluctuations, the use of financial derivatives, etc. In the wake of the attacks, I starred looking at all kinds of disruptions, and it became clear that there’s a lot more to consider than contingency planning or financial hedging. THERE ARE LOW-PROBABILITY/HIGH IMPACT EVENTS like terrorist attacks that may cause unplanned exists from important markets or even the demise of the unprepared business’ .... During MIT’s three year study on resilient companies and interviews with dozens of companies, found that a culture of resilience was a common element. He argues: ‘The essence of resilience is the containment of disruption and recovery from it. Culture contributes to resilience by endowing employees with a set of principles regarding the proper response when the unexpected does occur, and when the formal organization’s policy does not cover the situation at hand or is too slow to react, it suggests the course of action to take’ ...” [124]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 239:

In speaking of contingency planning, it's worth noting the ensuing.

Murphy's law states: “...If anything can go wrong, it ultimately will....” [96] Nonetheless, I insist that in many instances this “...law...” is universally used not to get “...preparedness...” in advance and in place. So planning and preparation becomes lax. Subsequently, the loss disruption ─ once crystallized ─ is congruently blamed on Murphy's law. This is rampant mediocrity.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 240:

“...After-the-fact no longer works .... Bring it back if you have any trouble with it, and I’ll fix it somehow,’ was the standard comment when you used to pick up a bicycle, automobile, food mixer, or lawn mower from the repair shop. And the repairman meant what he said. He was confident that if he had overlooked anything or made a mistake of any kind, he would get a second shot at fixing .... The ‘second shot’ is a luxury that no longer exists in many businesses. You get only one chance — after that, you’ll be talking only with attorneys, insurance agents, or bankers .... Life used to be simple. You knew your customers on a first-name basis. Your product or service was a relatively simple one — understood by both you and your customer. Your name and reputation were sufficient to cover any error or oversight .... But the world has become complex, too complex to allow such comfortable relationships. Consumer expectations are matching the complexities. Instantaneous news coverage of accidents and losses virtually precludes the private, out-of-sight settlement of risk effects that had previously allowed the after-the-fact resolution of risk to succeed. The breadth in that old idea is rapidly being squeezed out — like the inevitable tightening of a boa constrictor around its victim .... The price for public exposure of loss is high. Managers have begun to realize that risk must be examined formally and resolved beforehand rather than being settled after-the-fact. And they learn from others. It was the 1982 sinking of the offshore drilling rig Ocean Ranger that spurred EXXON top management to order a systematic evaluation of their offshore drilling risks … Even though EXXON does not own such rigs, it recognized that even conducting operations aboard them created risks that demanded before-the-fact identification, evaluation, and control....” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 241:

Prof. Hamel, along those lines by de Grey and Grose, states: “...From Nostradamus to Alvin Toffler, individuals and organizations have long been obsessed with trying to see the future. The goal is to somehow get advanced warning of ‘what will be’...” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 242:

Furthering the motions by Hamel, de Grey, my beloved father and my own self (that is, seeking to further the quest and findings about diverse perspectives on knowledge), Dr. Hauerwas has some invaluable words of wisdom about “...Universal Knowledges....” Ensuing:

Stanley Hauerwas, B.D. M.A. M.Phil and Ph.D.: “...in support of the liberal notion that the knowledges that constitute the university have no ‘use’ fail to ask what [John Henry] Newman mean by ‘universal knowledge.’ By ‘universal’ Newman did not mean that the knowledges that constitute liberal learning cannot be justified by their utility, but rather that all knowledge was interconnected because the ‘universe in its length and breadth is so intimately knit together.’ To be educated is not to be well read or to know a great deal about this or that subject. Rather, it is the only true enlargement of mind which is the power of viewing many things at once as one whole, of referring them severally to their true place in the universal system, or understanding their respective values, and determining their mutual dependence...” [95]

And Hauerwas continues:

“... Thus is that form of Universal Knowledges sets up in the individual intellect, and constitutes its perfection. Possessed of this real illumination, the mind never views any part of the extended subject-matter of Knowledge without recollecting that it is but a part, or without the associations which spring from this recollection. It makes every thing in some sort lead to every thing else; it would communicate the image of the whole to every separate portion, till that whole becomes in imagination like a spirit, everywhere pervading and penetrating its component parts, and giving them one definite meaning .... Philosophy, not theology, Newman believes to be the discipline that is distinct from all the sciences, that is, ‘in some sense’ philosophy is ‘a science of sciences.’ ...” [95] I must communicate that this wisdom is “...hyperbolically...” optimum.

Notwithstanding, said “...Universal Knowledges,...” an indeed appreciated and practicable notion is a sub-system (or only as a function of) what I have here defined as “...applied omniscience....” There is no incongruousness, but an absolute synergistic supplementary. My applied omniscience definition at « http://bit.ly/c8zAeb » I strongly believe in one KNOWLEDGE stemming from applied omniscience.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 243:

In the mean time, there is an Arab adage to share with you: “...That who foretells the truth lies even if he is telling the truth....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 244:

Sir Karl Popper, to that end, argues: “...We may become the makers of our fate when we have ceased to pose as its prophets .... Because of strictly logical reasons, it is impossible for us to predict the future course of history....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 245:

Consequences of attempting to predict the future?

John Smart: “...’The future can’t be predicted,’ is a common refrain … But … when [this perspective] is wrong, it is profoundly wrong....” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 246:

And, along those same lines, Jean Cocteau (1989 – 1963) points out: “...The future doesn’t belong to anyone. There are no harbingers; there are only but debtors...” [130] [130] [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 247:

Further insight along these lines:

By Gary Hamel, Ph.D. : “...The future belongs not to those who possess a crystal ball, but those willing to challenge the biases and prejudices of the ‘establishment.’ The future belongs more to the unorthodox than it does to the prognosticators [ … and/or predictioneers ...], more to the movement than to the starry-eyed....” [87] (Leading the Revolution - ISBN-13: 978-0452283244). Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 248:

From the Institute for the Future, Paul Saffo and Roy Amara make a point regarding change:

“...I think about it as ‘orders of impact.’ First order, second order, etc. When an earthquake happens you have a whole series of waves that follow. The first order of the auto was the horseless carriage. The second order was the traffic jam. The third-order impact was the move toward the suburbs. This led in turn to the creation of huge metropolitan areas....” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 249:

To this end John Lienhard comments: “...We live in a technology-dense world .... We are terrifyingly naked without knowing elementary things about [how technologies] work...” [104] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 250:

Addressing Kurzweil, Grossman and de Grey, a clever and prominent physician makes his point. Dr. Joseph Knoll, M.D. who effected an extraordinary reflection:

“...We shall never forget that humans obviously cannot change natural laws, but by discovering their mechanisms of action they learn to make use of this knowledge. By conquering gravitation man stepped across his naturally given limit and ultimately landed on the moon....” [59]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 251:

Impossibilities rendered fully feasible?

Sir Arthur C. Clarke’s Three Laws: “...(1) When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong. (2) The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible. (3) Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic....” [166]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 252:

There is a valuable thought about the future and its arrival, attributed to Gary Hamel, “...The problem with the future is that is different [since is profound, its scientific properties are being dramatically changed in real time and all of the time]. If you are unable to think differently, the Future will always arrive as a surprise...” [28]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 253:

In addition and as it is believed to be proclaimed by Samuel Goldwyn, “...Only a fool would make predictions, especially about the future....” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 254:

Applicable womb-to-tomb, epidemiological vista will be beyond vital.

I will include a remarkable quotation by Strategos Institute Founder and London Business School Professor. Prof. Gary Hamel, Ph.D.:

“...Each revolution in art was based on a re-conception of reality. It wasn’t the canvas, the pigments, or the brushes that changed, but how the artist perceived the world. In the same sense, it’s not the tools that distinguish industry revolutionaries from hummed. rum incumbents — not the information technology they harness, not the process they use, not their facilities. Instead, is their ability to escape the stranglehold of the familiar...” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 255:

I strongly support JFK’s ensuing take as well.

President John F. Kennedy’s speech on September 12, 1962 at Race University: “...If this capsule history of our progress teaches us anything, it is that man, in his quest for knowledge and progress, is determined and cannot be deterred. The exploration of space will go ahead, whether we join in it or not, and it is one of the great adventures of all time, and no nation which expects to be the leader of other nations can expect to stay behind in the race for space .... Well, space is there, and we're going to climb it, and the moon and the planets are there, and new hopes for knowledge and peace are there. And, therefore, as we set sail we ask God's blessing on the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventure on which man has ever embarked...” [80]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 256:

In aligning the idea of understanding the nature of change and the impacts stemming from said change, former GE’s CEO Jack Welch indicated:

“...Seeing the world the way it is, not the way we hope it will be or wish it to be...” [42]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 257:

To further enlighten the present material, Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) stated: “...Jeff Immelt realizes that the world changes every day and that his job is to keep GE competitive in that changing world. But his ability to take the company where it needs to go is greatly facilitated by the fact that he has a clear understanding of where he is starting...” [42]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 258:

By Thomas Edison indicates: “...If we all did the things we are capable of doing well we would literally astound ourselves...” [44]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 259:

Otto Herman Khan (RAND Corporation's Dr. Strangelove). He veritably stated: “...I'm against fashionable thinking ... I'm against ignorance ... I am against the whole cliche of the moment ... I'm against sloppy, emotional thinking…[I am against incomplete, linear thinking.. And ..I am against inexpensive thinking....”]....” [43]. Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 260:

Salvador Dali in seconding the motion by Khan offers us a thought: “...Get real; dream the impossible....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 261:

In case, you just yet don't have it unambiguously clear, this is Valéry's take in the beginning of the last century.

(by Paul Valéry, 1932)

“...All the notions we thought solid, all the values of civilized life, all that made for stability in international relations, all that made for regularity in the economy … in a word, all that tended happily to limit the uncertainty of the morrow, all that gave nations and individuals some confidence in the morrow … all this seems badly compromised. I have consulted all augurs I could find, of every species, and I have heard only vague words, contradictory prophecies, curiously feeble assurances. Never has humanity combined so much power with so much disorder, so much anxiety with so many playthings, so much knowledge with so much uncertainty...” [56]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 262:

There is great American scientist offering cautious optimism!

Dr. Robert H. Goddard, Ph.D. : “...It is difficult to say what is impossible, for the dream of yesterday is the hope of today and the reality of tomorrow....” [117] Biography of Dr. Goddard at http://bit.ly/bRzGqm

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 263:

AN ACTUAL DIALOGUE OF DARWIN, NEWTON, KANT, GOETHE, BACON, DA VINCI, GALILEO, TESLA, BUCMINSTER FULLER, CHURCHILL AND OTHERS WITH ANDRES ? [131]

Andres: “...Charles, How does your mind envision in general? And what about you, Isaac?...”

Charles Darwin: “...My mind seems to have become a kind of machine for grinding general laws out of large collections of facts....” [131]

Isaac Newton: “...If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants....” [131]

Andres: “...How do you visualize or do you not visualize, Immanuel? Can you offer us a suggestion?...”

Immanuel Kant: “...Seek not the favor of the multitude; it is seldom got by honest and lawful means. But seek the testimony of few; and number not voices, but weigh them....” [131]

Andres: “...How does your vision and thought relate, Charles? And what about in your case Immanuel?...”

Charles Darwin: “...The highest possible stage in moral culture is when we recognize that we ought to control our thoughts....” [131]

Immanuel Kant: “...All thought must, directly or indirectly, by way of certain characters, relate ultimately to intuitions, and therefore, with us, to sensibility, because in no other way can an object be given to us. Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind....” [131]

Andres: “...Johann, in addition to the views of Kant, Darwin and Newton, How — in your view — one should see? Can you give us some hints?...”

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe: “...Every day we should hear at least one little song, read one good poem, see one exquisite picture, and, if possible, speak a few sensible words. In nature we never see anything isolated, but everything in connection with something else which is before it, beside it, under it and over it. The hardest thing to see is what is in front of your eyes....” [131]

Andres: “...Johann, How does your mind envision?...”

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe: “...All intelligent thoughts have already been thought; what is necessary is only to try to think them again....” [131]

Andres: “...Francis, What is your take about the operation of one's mind and / or perhaps a personal trait?...”

Francis Bacon: “...Of all virtues and dignities of the mind, goodness is the greatest, being the character of the Deity; and without it, man is a busy, mischievous, wretched thing....” [131]

Andres: “...How do people exercise thinking, Francis?...”

Francis Bacon: “...People usually think according to their inclinations, speak according to their learning and ingrained opinions, but generally act according to custom....” [131]

Andres: “...What truth holds intact regardless, Charles?...”

Charles Darwin: “...False facts are highly injurious to the progress of science, for they often endure long; but false views, if supported by some evidence, do little harm, for every one takes a salutary pleasure in proving their falseness....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your POV concerning science, Imamnuel?...”

Immanuel Kant: “...Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your POV concerning science, Johann?...”

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: “...He who possesses art and science has religion; he who does not possess them, needs religion. The credit of advancing science has always been due to individuals and never to the age....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your POV concerning science, Isaac?...”

Isaac Newton: “...To me there has never been a higher source of earthly honor or distinction than that connected with advances in science....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your POV concerning science, Charles?...”

Charles Darwin: “...A scientific man ought to have no wishes, no affections, — a mere heart of stone. False facts are highly injurious to the progress of science, for they often endure long; but false views, if supported by some evidence, do little harm, for every one takes a salutary pleasure in proving their falseness....” [131]

Andres: “...What topic is for one to really learn about it, Johann?...”

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: “...No one has ever learned fully to know themselves. Only by joy and sorrow does a person know anything about themselves and their destiny. They learn what to do and what to avoid....” [131]

Andres: “...In learning, What is important for one to bear in mind, Charles?...”

Charles Darwin: “...In the long history of humankind (and animal kind, too) those who learned to collaborate and improvise most effectively have prevailed....” [131]

Andres: In seeing, “...How does one make a decision, Leonardo?...”

Leonardo da Vinci: “...There are three classes of people: those who see, those who see when they are shown, those who do not see. Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than the imagination when awake?...” [131]

Andres: “...Leonardo, I have heard an appalling notion from some management mogul. This person indicates that if an individual does not get ‘mad,’ she and he won't solve a significant problem? What fosters knowledge and what precludes it?...”

Leonardo da Vinci: “...Where there is shouting, there is no true knowledge....” [131]

Andres: “...Francis, I have heard an appalling notion from some management mogul. This person indicates that if an individual does not get “...mad,...” she and he won't solve a significant problem? What fosters knowledge and what precludes it?...”

Francis Bacon: “...Anger makes dull men witty, but it keeps them poor....” [131]

Andres: “...Knowledge to be bestowed upon ourselves and others to achieve what, Francis?...”

Francis Bacon: “...For also knowledge itself is power....” [131]

Andres: “...What is philosophy good for in your view, Francis?...”

Francis Bacon: “...A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion....”

Andres: “...How valuable to you is prudence, Francis?...”

Francis Bacon: “...A prudent question is one-half of wisdom....” [131]

Andres: “...Where does opportunities com from, Francis?...”

Francis Bacon: “...A wise man will make more opportunities than he finds....” [131]

Andres: “...Where do you get knowledge from, Leonardo?...”

Leonardo da Vinci: “...All our knowledge has its origins in our perceptions....” [131]

Andres: “...Why is so important to conceive the right future, Herman?...”

Herman Kahn: “...Projecting a persuasive image of a desirable and practical future is extremely important to high morale, to dynamism, to consensus, and in general to help the wheels of society turn smoothly....” [131]

Andres: “...What is changing the most in your view and what are the “...downside...” implications of said changes, Herman?...”

Herman Kahn: “...A total nuclear freeze is counterproductive — especially now, when technology is rapidly changing and the Soviets have some important strategic advantages....” [131]

Andres: “...What have you done with your thinking capacity, Herman?...”

Herman Kahn: “...For some years I have spent my time on exactly these questions — both in thinking about ways to prevent war, and in thinking about how to fight, survive, and terminate a war, should it occur....” [131]

Andres: “...What relevance do you give — as a specific value type of thing — you give to morality and ethics, Herman?...”

Herman Kahn: “...Human and moral factors must always be considered. They must never be missing from policies and from public discussion....” [131]

Andres: “...Why must we advance science? Can you be a bit specific, Galileo? ...”

Galileo Galilei: “...By denying scientific principles, one may maintain any paradox....” [131]

Andres: “...What is mathematics to you, Albert?...”

Albert Einstein: “...Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical ideas....” [131]

Andres: “...What is imagination good for, Albert?...”

Albert Einstein: “...Imagination is everything. It is the preview of life's coming attractions. Imagination will take you everywhere....” [131]

Andres: “...What is education?...”

Albert Einstein: “...Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school....” [131]

Andres: “...How does one should live life wisely in your opinion, Albert?...”

Albert Einstein: “...Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning....” [131]

Andres: “...What are your thoughts lately?...”

Albert Einstein: “...I want to know all Gods thoughts; all the rest are just details....” [131]

Andres: “...What are the connections among every discipline of knowledge?...”

Albert Einstein: “...All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree....” [131]

Andres: “...What is science good for, Albert?...”

Albert Einstein: “...It stands to the everlasting credit of science that by acting on the human mind it has overcome man's insecurity before himself and before nature....” [131]

Andres: “...Is it learning important, Ben?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...A learned blockhead is a greater blockhead than an ignorant one....” [131]

Andres: “...What is the problem with self-made ignoramuses?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...Being ignorant is not so much a shame, as being unwilling to learn....” [131]

Andres: “...Who has taught you the most, Ben?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...Experience is a dear teacher, but fools will learn at no other....” [131]

Andres: “...How do you forge an educated mind?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn....” [131]

Andres: “...What is the opposite of Reason?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...The way to see by Faith is to shut the Eye of Reason....” [131]

Andres: “...Where will you trust your most treasured funds?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...An investment in knowledge pays the best interest....”

Andres: “...How does one succeed?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...Do not fear mistakes. You will know failure. Continue to reach out....” [131]

Andres: “...In the West wisdom seems to be a fashion while in the Far East this is a matter of great attention, is it not?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...Wise men don't need advice. FOOLS WON'T TAKE IT....” [131]

Andres: “...What is the methodical sequence to success?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...Being busy does not always mean real work. The object of all work is production or accomplishment and to either of these ends there must be forethought, system, planning, intelligence, and honest purpose, as well as perspiration. Seeming to do is not doing....” [131]

Andres: “...How do you get to prevailing in seizing success?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...I find my greatest pleasure, and so my reward, in the work that precedes what the world calls success....” [131]

Andres: “...How important is winning?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your take about complexity?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...I know this world is ruled by infinite intelligence. Everything that surrounds us — everything that exists — proves that there are infinite laws behind it. There can be no denying this fact. It is mathematical in its precision....” [131]

Andres: “...Do you trust serendipities or do you prefer pseudo-serendipities?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...I never did anything by accident, nor did any of my inventions come by accident; they came by work....” [131]

Andres: “...How do you gauge success?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...Just because something doesn't do what you planned it to do doesn't mean it's useless....” [131]

Andres: “...What is that long-ignored flank?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work....” [131]

Andres: “...Richard, How do you like the world's technological advances?...”

R. Buckminster Fuller: “...Humanity is acquiring all the right technology for all the wrong reasons....” [131]

Andres: “...How do you capture success in your daily practice?...”

R. Buckminster Fuller: “...Most of my advances were by mistake. You uncover what is when you get rid of what isn't....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your view on conventional [‘out-of-the-box’ ‭ — so-called ‭ — ] discernment?...”

R. Buckminster Fuller: “...People should think things out fresh and not just accept conventional terms and the conventional way of doing things....” [131]

Andres: “...Richard, do you believe in becoming strategically surprised?...”

R. Buckminster Fuller: “...There is nothing in a caterpillar that tells you it's going to be a butterfly....” [131]

Andres: “...Give me a hint! How involved are you with futures study?...”

R. Buckminster Fuller: “...We are called to be architects of the future, not its victims....” [131]

Andres: “...In your own words, What is your own significance towards education?...”

R. Buckminster Fuller: “...You can never learn less, you can only learn more....” [131]

Andres: “...Nikola, Are you future-ready?...”

Nikola Tesla: “...Let the future tell the truth, and evaluate each one according to his work and accomplishments. The present is theirs; the future, for which I have really worked, is mine....” [131]

Andres: “...What is the thinking-process failing these days?...”

Nikola Tesla: “...The scientists of today think deeply instead of clearly. One must be sane to think clearly, but one can think deeply and be quite insane....” [131]

Andres: “...Having lived through so much history, Has life been a struggle for you?...”

Winston Churchill: “...A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty....” [131]

Andres: “...How does a manager prevail?...”

Winston Churchill: “...Battles are won by slaughter and maneuver. The greater the general, the more he contributes in maneuver, the less he demands in slaughter....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your take on the quality-assurance movement?...”

Winston Churchill: “...Great and good are seldom the same man....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your mind-expansion pathway?...”

Winston Churchill: “...I am always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught....” [131]

Andres: “...Can there be anti-leadership? Offer an instance?...”

Winston Churchill: “...If Hitler invaded hell I would make at least a favorable reference to the devil in the House of Commons....” [131]

Andres: “...How supportive of the 'PRESENT' are you?...”

Winston Churchill: “...If we open a quarrel between past and present, we shall find that we have lost the future....” [131]

Forewarning: The answers by the dialogue parties with the undersigned are fully accurate and supported by the facts. Verify, to trust, at www.brainyquote.com

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 264:

Actionable knowledge creation and utilization, Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) points out some interesting reflections too often ignored by many private, public, NGO, supranational, and even academia incumbents:

“...The leadership job of the twenty-first century is to enhance brainpower of an organization by having leaders at all levels engaged in Virtuous Teaching Cycles. The case has been made that we now live in a knowledge era where the value of intellectual capital has supplemental physical assets. In this world, leaders must make everyone smarter while simultaneously aligning the energy and commitment of the people in their organizations … Thomas Stewart, a Fortune Editor and a leading thinker in the field, outlined the foundations for them knowledge economy with powerful simplicity in his most recent book, The Wealth of Knowledge: ‘The knowledge economy stands on three pillars. The first: Knowledge has become what we buy, sell, and do. It is the most important factor of production. The second pillar is a mate, a corollary to the first: Knowledge assets — that is, intellectual capital — have become more important to companies than financial and physical assets. The third pillar is this: To prosper in this new economy and exploit these newly vital assets, we need new vocabularies, new management techniques, new technologies, and new strategies. On three pillars rest all the new economy’s laws and its profits’...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 265:

Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) supplements:

“...Stewart’s ranking reflects a massive movement underway to actually measure intellectual capital … The concept is correct and we put Stewart’s work right at the front … to reinforce the importance for companies to continue defining, measuring and improving ways of generating new intellectual capital … Teaching Organizations are the needed response to today’s emphasis on knowledge creation. Today, intellectual assets trump physical assets in nearly every industry....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 266:

Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) asserts:

“...Despite the boom and bust of the recent dot-bomb era, there is no question that we are in the early stages of an era in which technology and biotechnology will have inescapable consequences for how businesses are run and organized. The practices, systems, policies and mind-sets that prevailed in the old industrial economy will not do the job. The foregone conclusion of the late 1990s that the old industrial behemoths would be agile start-ups is equally wrong for the times....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 267:

And he also indicates:

“...Rather, we now know that the winners of the future will adapt and innovate to exploit emerging technological and social changes. They will be big, fast, and smart. The winners will create value by having a workforce that is more aligned, energized and smarter than their competitors. They will leverage size and act with speed across internal and external organizational boundaries....” [42]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 268

A fast-paced world as of 1960?

“...As of 1960, computer chips have been built upon lithography, screen-printing that has allowed us to imprint forms as small as 100 nanometers (a nanometer is one billionth of a meter). One-hundredth of a cell. One-thousandth of a human hair. One-ten millionth the diameter of an elusive celluloid...” [194]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 269

I believe in simplicity stemming from a profound understanding of complexity only!

Stephen Jay Gould ( http://tiny.cc/6pngc ): “...Once you build a complex machine, it can perform so many unanticipated tasks. Build a computer ‘for’ processing checks at the plant, and it can also … whip anyone’s ass (or at least then them perpetually) in tic-tac-toe....” [187]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 270

“...We’ll infect you with the same orthodoxies we’ve infected everyone else in your industry...” [64]

Gregory S. Paul and Earl Cox: “...The power and complexity of computers are growing exponentially. Computers are becoming more like brains. Sometime during the next century, we will assert in the fashion of our made-up Future Flight authors that cyberdevices will become conscious and eventually will match the power of the human mind. The power of these cyberminds will extend beyond human levels in ways we cannot even imagine. These cyberbeings will proliferate in vast numbers. They will design and build a robotic supercivilization destined for outer space … The new cyberbeings will ‘mount up’ in polymorphic enclosures, intricately designed bodies able to assume any multisensory form. Their minds will be as emotional and intuitive as ours. They will be immortal. And they will be us, if we choose … We certainly will not be able to control the smart robot the way we control the car. Robots will have their own agendas and may have no use for mortals. Do not despair. It is probable that humans may be able to transfer their minds into the new cybersystems and join the cybercivilization. Not for the elite alone, anymore wishing to go robotic will be able to do so as cybercivilization spreads out into the universe. Intelligent cybertechnologies will become as cheap as small computers are today. Eventually, cybercivilization may adjust the structure of the universe itself when galaxies are networked … Do theologians have it all wrong? Whether God made humankind or not, we could create for ourselves those we could call gods. And, as it is now, it will be our willed choice to be with them or not. Scientists who understand the scale of geologic time agree; eventually, it will become as if mankind never existed. Our belief is that in some way, after we are gone forever, we will still be able to remember what, and who, we once were....” [169]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 271

DAKOTA TRIBAL WISDOM AND ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGIES

“...Dakota tribal wisdom says that when you discover you’re on a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount. Of course, there are other strategies. You can change riders. You can get a committee to study the dead horse. You can benchmark how other companies ride dead horses. You can declare that it’s cheaper to feed a dead horse. You can harness several dead horses together. But after you’ve tried all these things, you’re still going to have to dismount...” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 272

“...Government policies are influential in the macroscopic risks that threaten our lives. As a society has been transferred from simple agrarianism to a complex technologically-driven living standard, competing special interests force the government to make compromises that inevitably create risks — even the risk of war....” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 273

“...The law is recognizing the trend toward complexity of life and the inability of the average person to recognize and overcome risks associated with it … Whereas our forefathers could knowingly inspect the horseshoes a blacksmith nailed on their horses’ hoofs, the average person today cannot knowledgeably inspect a microwave oven or a car’s automatic transmission....” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 274

“...A primary theme in Alvin Toffler’s best selling book Future Shock is that society’s rate of change is increasing. Everything around us ─ including ourselves ─ is rapidly changing. Nothing is stable, permanent, constant, or fixed. Neither is risk. It is an indigenous element in the volatility of life. If anything, risk expands at a greater rate than the societal rate of change ─ due to its roots in uncertainty and ignorance of consequences, which multiply during mercurial instability....” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 275

Napoleon wrote to his general the ensuing:

“...Your letter tells me nothing. You will however have to be able to interrogate in order to know the names of the regiments and the commanding general and a hundred things, all very important — the morale of the troops, the way in which they are fed, the strength of the different units, and what is known from conservations with the colonels and officers of the corps .... I expected several pages and I get only two lines. Redeem all that by writing me in great detail....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 276

Attributed to Robert Kennedy. “...The future is not a privilege but a perpetual conquest...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 277

BONAPARTE’S PROPHECIES ON HURRICANE KATRINA’, SANDY'S AND GULF OF MEXICO’S SINCE (DATED) THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

On geology Napoleon generally reflects:

“...It is very important … to have good maps of all the country between the Adige, the Po, and the Adda … which will probably be the theater of new wars on the same scale as the large map of Italy. It is necessary to have all reconnaissances made at the Topographical Bureau of War in order that we could, if necessary, send the generals all suitable instructions. Then, from the commencement of war, they would know the defensive campaign field-works that will have to be prepared in the various positions in case of unfortunate developments .... I believe that the topographical engineers work, but I am not sure that they work according to good fundamental principles. We have them produce registers of the survey of lands and not military maps, which means that in twenty years, and I don’t know how many engineers and how much money, to map only a portion of the departments of Rhine and Moselle and Mont-Tonnerre, which are truly important. To make twenty years to finish maps and plans is to work too much posterity .... How many circumstances could occur over the next twenty years that we would regret? If one of them had been on the scale of a Cassini map we could already have had all of the Rhine frontier. How many circumstances could occur over the next twenty years where we will regret them? ...” [113]

And Bonaparte adds:

“...What events can occur, even for this accumulation of paper, before we can reap any advantage from all this work? I don’t know why war is waged with this type of map … The fact is, I have not had, on my visit to the Rhine, any map where I could gain knowledge of the country. We have to draw maps of Mont-Blanc … and the Piedmont the same progress that we followed for the departments of the Rhine, nothing will be finished in our lifetime .... Engineers are too much masters of what they wish to do. I have not asked for anything other than the completion of the Cassini map. Rest assured that the operations are not directed on projects that are too vast. Experience proves that the greatest defect in general administration is to want to do too much: that results in not having what is needed … Order them especially to mark clearly the nature of the different roads, in order to distinguish those which are practicable or impracticable for artillery. If all the debouches of the Black Mountains are accurately located, this map will be one of the most essential that we could have for....” [113]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 278

STRATEGOS INSTITUTE’S FOUNDER AND LONDON BUSINESS SCHOOL’S PROFESSOR ON THE FUTURE AND THE DERIVED ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGY FRAMEWORK

By Gary Hamel, Ph.D. : “...We believe that the goal is not to predict the future, but to imagine a future made possible by changes in technology, life style, work style, regulation, global geopolitics, and the like. And there are as many viable futures as there as imaginative firms that can understand deeply the dynamics at work right now which hold opportunities to become the author of the new. For the future is not what will happen; the future is what is happening. The present and the future don’t about each other, neatly divided between the five-year plan and the great unknown beyond. Rather they are intertwined. Every company is in the process of becoming — of becoming an anachronism irrelevant to the future, or of becoming the harbinger of the future. The long-term is not something that happens someday; it is what every company is building or forfeiting .... Only those who can imagine and preemptively create the future will be around to enjoy it … Creating a compelling view of tomorrow’s opportunities and moving preemptively to secure the future are tasks for neither dilettantes nor the merely intellectual curious … Other companies, the laggards, were more interested in protecting the past than in creating the future … We believe, and will argue strongly, that a company must not only get to the future first, it must get there for less .... And re-engineering charge is simply the penalty that a company must pay for not having anticipated the future .... If senior executives don’t have reasonably detailed answers to the ‘future’ set of questions, and if the answers they do have are not substantially different from the ‘today’ answers, there is little chance their companies will remain market leaders .... For much of the 1980s, IBM had been driving toward the future while looking out the rear-view mirror .... Too often, profound thinking about the future and how to shape it occurs only when present success has been substantially eroded .... Creating the future is more challenging than playing catch up, in that you have to create your own road map .... The goal is not simply to benchmark a competitor’s products and processes and imitate its methods, but to develop an independent point of view about tomorrow’s opportunities and how to exploit them. Pathbreaking is a lot more rewarding than benchmarking. One doesn’t get to the future first by letting someone else blaze the trail .... Passengers will get to the future, but their fate will not be in their own hands. Theirs profits from the future will be modest at best. Those who drive industry revolution — companies that have a clear, permeated view of where they want tom take their industry and are capable of orchestrating resources inside and outside the company to get there first — will be handsomely rewarded… The future is not an extrapolation of the past. New industrial structures will supersede old industrial structures .... Opportunities that at first blush seem evolutionary will prove to be revolutionary .... A commitment substantial enough to beget the perseverance required to create the future must be based on something more than a hunch .... But to create the future, a company must first be able to forget some of its past … ‘The future was predictable, but hardly anyone predicted it’ ...” [87]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 279

Sir Francis Bacon: “... He that will not apply new remedies must expect new evils, for time is the greatest innovator ...” [2]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 280

Understanding the future?

“... Past or future, was a succession of violent breaks or waves, with no base at all....” [135]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 281

How to prevail?

James Thomson (1700 - 1749) ─ a Scots poet and playwright ─ argues: “...Great trials seem to be a necessary preparation for great duties ...” [137]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 282

Spiritual author and leadership?

John C. Maxwell (born 1947) ─ an evangelical Christian author, speaker, and pastor who has written more than 50 books ─ stated: “...A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 283

What do humans wish to do with their life and universe?

Simon Conway Morris, Ph.D, verbalizes: “...Barring a daring technology in the future, human civilization will be hard-pressed to destroy or deflect incoming bolides [meteoric fireballs] and so avoid impact-driven catastrophes .... enmeshed in medieval cruelty, unwilling to face the boundlessly happy future; a future that, strange to say, is always just around the corner .... Western culture's penchant for regarding science and technology as the guarantors of indefinite progress toward some hazy but glorious future paradise ...” [118]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 284

In 1990 Brad Leithauser, New Yorker made a lucid comment pertaining to the rate of change at that time: “...It reminds us that, in our accelerating, headlong era, the future presses so close upon us that those who ignore it inhabit not the present but the past ...” [106]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 285

How really empowered and dis-empowered are we?

Stewart Brand (1968): “... ...We are as gods and might as well get good at it ...” [104]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 286

Forty years without public education reforms in the West and the prevalent sequel going unpaid until when?

Carl Sagan: “...We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows about science and technology ...” [104]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 287

Prof. Gary Hamel, Ph.D. : “...Denial is tragic. Delay is deadly ...” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 288

What can knowledge do for progress and modernity?

Edward Teller: “...The science of today is the technology of tomorrow ...” [83]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 289

Are you emotionally stable before the future?

Marcus Aurelius Antoninus: “...Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present ...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 290

Edward Teller: “...Two paradoxes are better than one; they may even suggest a solution ...” [93]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 291

Patrick Dixon: “...Take hold of the future or the future will take hold of you — be futurewise ...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 292

GBN’s CEO Eamonn Nelly: “...We have globalized the economy and culture, but we have not yet globalized our sense of ourselves ...” [89]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 293

Dr. Bernie Siegel, M.D. : “...Hope is a memory of the future ...” [59]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 294

In search of those that are instituting a search?

T. S. Elliot: “...We must never cease from exploring. At the end of all of our exploring will be to arrive at where we began and know the place for the first time ...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 295

CEO Emeritus of Visa International, Dee Hock: “...The problem is never how to get new innovative thoughts into your mind, but how to get old ones out ...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 296

Do we respect time and its passage solemnly?

William Shakespeare (Macbeth): “...To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, creeps in this petty pace from day to day, to the last syllable of recorded time; and all our yesterdays have lighted fools the way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more; it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing ...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 297

What can we do about time passage?

W. E. Gladstone — British Prime Minister — (1809 — 1898): “...You cannot fight against the future...” [17]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 298

Future and the genius?

Ernest Dimnet: “...Too often we forget that genius, too, depends upon the data within its reach, that even Archimedes could not have devised Edison's inventions....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 299

Future-liable if you don’t pay attention?

John Galsworthy: “...If you don't think about the future, you cannot have one....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 300

Malcolm X: ...”...The future belongs to those who prepare for it today...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 301

Either or what?

Anthony J. D'Angelo: “...Run to meet the future or it's going to run you down...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 302

How do we sign up by phenomenal lots of tons of smart work?

Leonard I. Sweet: “...The future is not something we enter. The future is something we create...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 303

Is too much history studying dangerous?

Michael Cibenko: “...One problem with gazing too frequently into the past is that we may turn around to find the future has run out on us....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 304

Perpetual learning for Afterlife?

John Wayne: “...Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we've learned something from yesterday....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 305

In Shock, Awe and Bewilderment for not Understanding?

Alvin Toffler: “...Man has a limited biological capacity for change. When this capacity is overwhelmed, the capacity is in future shock....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 306

Do people have an innate “...love affair...” with speed?

Henry Ford: “...If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 307

Andrew Hiles argues about the “...future...” (2007):

“...In many senses the future will be more of the same. There will still be cross-cultural issues to deal with, different political systems, currency problems, different calendar systems, different values, completely different social structures, etc., both within Asia and between Asia and the other trading blocs. Fires will still occur, petty crime will still go on, economics will boom and dust, corruption will stay, illegal economic activities will continue, workplace problems will not go away ─ and so on. The basic ‘stuff’ of business and BCP [Business Continuity Planning] will continue to provide the challenges that all organizations and businesses face. BUT THERE WILL BE NEW OR ESCALATED CHALLENGES THAT HAVE TO BE FACED...” [135]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 308

Recalling not to fail into what?

George Santayana: “...Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it....” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 309

The larger historic perspective is good for which purpose?

Unknown author: “...Those who stare at the past have their backs turned to the future...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 310

Grave implications of contrarians to fostering change?

Max Planck: “...An important scientific innovation rarely makes its way by gradually winning over and converting its opponents: What does happen is that the opponents gradually die out....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 311

Who gets the practical and useful merit?

Thomas Edison: “...I have more respect for the fellow with a single idea who gets there than for the fellow with a thousand ideas who does nothing....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 312

Learning from the past in reversal?

Dillon Wardian: “...Those who know their past are tempted to repeat it but on the winning side....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 313

Buying your membership to the future?

Mehmet Ildan: “...Future is an unknown country which requires tough visas for anyone to enter. Not all of us will get the chance to visit it....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 314

How does one discipline the mind?

Honoré de Balzac: “...The mind is enabled by rigid deduction to link it with the past; and to man, the past is singularly like the future; tell him what has been, and you seldom fail to show him what will be....” [82]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 315

Is it about inspiration, is it about knowledge or is it about both jointly?

To this end Dr. Bernie Siegel, M.D. : “...I’m always saying that knowledge isn’t power if you don’t have inspiration....” [59]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 316

How can one unleash the energies of creation?

The Yoga Sutras of Pantajali: “...When you are inspired by some great purpose, some extraordinary project, all your thoughts break their bounds. Your mind transcends limitations, your consciousness expands in ever direction, and you find yourself in a new, great and wonderful world....” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 317

What can we do instead of what can we stomach and mind?

Dandridge M. Cole: “...We cannot predict the future, but we can invent it....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 318

How does one connect today with the future?

“...My Colleagues at the Long Foundation have helped me see the surprising connections between today and the deep future....” [78]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 319

The Chairman and CEO of the Juran Institute, A. Blantow Godfrey, in 1995 indicated to this end:

“...What we know today is far greater than what we knew a few years ago....” [91]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 320

What kind of a keel does a vessel need to explore the unexplored with the unthinkable thinking perspective?

“...At the beginning of this book I used river rafting as an analogy for the future. But perhaps sailing is a better metaphor....” [78]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 321

How early your punctuality must be?

M.El Banna: “...The only way you can see the future is if you're ahead of your own time....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 322

Are we lacking what type of understanding?

Unknown thinker, “...We are walking toward the edge of a cliff—blindfolded … Our ability to understand the potential for future abrupt changes in climate is limited by our lack of understanding of the processes that control them....” [78]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 323

Europe has a vested interest in retrospection while California's vested interest is in prospection – By Andres

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 324

Where is our Nordic domicile?

Jean-Marie Guyau: “...The future is not what is coming at us, but what we are headed for...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 325

Count Lev Nikolaevich Tolstoi (1828 — 1910): “...I am convinced that the history of so-called scientific work in our famous centuries of European civilization will, in a couple of hundred years, represent an inexhaustible source of laughter and sorrow for future generations. The learned men of the small western part of our European continent lived for several centuries under the illusion that the eternal blessed life was the West’s future. They were interested in the problem of when and where this blessed life would come. But they never thought of how they were going to make their life better...” [69]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 326

A perspective that might prove helpful somewhat now:

Horace Mann (1796 — 1859) — American educationist: “...Lost, yesterday, somewhere between Sunrise and Sunset, two golden hours, each set with sixty diamond minutes. No reward is offered, for they are gone forever....” [2]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 327

Success comes along with tons and tons of smart and smarter work!

Gifford Pinchot: “...The vast possibilities of our great future will become realities only if we make ourselves responsible for that future....” [93]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 328

When evolution gets radicalized in applied science, a so-called breakthrough takes place. Hence, Einstein makes the case now.

Albert Einstein: “...It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has exceeded our humanity … We shall require a substantially new manner of thinking if mankind is to survive....” [4]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 329

In understanding at least the complexities embedded in the Universe, there is an Englishman with a great perspective. His quote ensues:

G.K. Chesterton (1874 — 1936), Essayist, Novelist, and Poet: “...The real trouble with this world of ours is not that it is an unreasonable world, nor that it is a reasonable one. The commonest kind of trouble is that it is nearly reasonable, but not quite. Life is not an illogicality; yet is a trap for logicians. It looks just a little more mathematical and regular than it is; its exactitude is obvious, but its inexactitude is hidden, its wildness lies in wait....” At http://bit.ly/1rdbP3t

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 330

What are intelligence and the brain’ and genome’s projected mind good for?

R. W. Young: “...Intelligence is that faculty of mind by which order is perceived in a situation previously considered disordered....” [78]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 331

In one instance, Dr. Albert Einstein points out: “...The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them....” [153] [60] In supporting this motion further, Dr. Aubrey de Grey establishes: “...To solve a very complicated problem, you generally need a fairly complicated solution [in advance]....” [59]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 332

Dr. Bertrand Russell will be gravely forewarning them of his famous sentence: “...I know of more people who'd rather die than think...”

Regarding people into imprudence, ignorance and not making reasonable decisions, Where can we get additional underpinnings?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 333

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (30 March 1746 — 16 April 1828): “...The sleep of reason produces monsters....” [98]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 334

Does age indeed become a liability in showing the futuristic lights of modernity and TRUE justice?

Mae Wets: “...You’re never too old to become younger...” [78]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 335

Technological platform termed the Internet. Look at the following take by Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572):

“...We have made the case throughout this book, and most people agree, that in the new ‘knowledge economy’ the key to winning is maximizing human capital. Ideas and knowledge have replaced physical goods as the most valued commodities in the global marketplace. Consequently, brains, energy and talent — human capital — are the primary source of value creation. But while many people and organizations grasp the concept, few have figured out how to really utilize the talents and knowledge of everyone in the company, especially the younger members of the company....” [42]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 336

From mysticism to science, the future and an interesting quotation.

Rosario M. Levins: “...Mythical thought is not pre-scientific; rather it anticipates the future state of being a science in that its past movement and its present direction are always in the same sense....” At http://bit.ly/1gK1Md3

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 337

The quotation on analytics, science and future. Ensuing:

Charles Babbage (1792 — 1871): “...The whole of the developments and operations of analysis are now capable of being executed by machinery … As soon as an Analytical Engine exists, it will necessary guide the future course of science....” [69]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 338

Stuart A. Copans: “...Study the past if you would divine the future...” [69]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 339

The quotation abut foretelling: Unknown: “...Declare the past, diagnose the present, [and] foretell the future....” [69] Brackets are mine.

By unknown author: “...The future belongs to science and to those who make friends with science...” [69]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 340

The Prometheus-Bound quotation.

Aeschylus (453 BC):

“...Prometheus: My mother …
foretold me, that not brute strength
Not violence, but cunning must give victory
To the rulers of the future....” [69]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 341

Elliot on the present and the past.

T. S. Elliot (1888 — 1965):

“...Time present and time past
Are both perhaps present in time future,
And time future contained in time past....” [70]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 342

The past, the future and the interlude that connects both.

Eugene O’Neill (1888 — 1953): “...The only living life is in the past and future … the present is an interlude … strange interlude in which we call on past and future to bear witness we are living....” [70]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 343

Bismarck and his lack of faith on the future.

A. J. P. Taylor (1906 — 1990): “...Bismarck was a political genius of the highest rank, but he lacked one essential quality of the constructive statesman: he had no faith in the future...” [70]

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God, the nineteenth and twenty centuries, as well as the future.

Max Frisch (1911 — 1991): “...In the nineteenth century the problem was that God is dead; in the twentieth century the problem is that man is dead. In the nineteenth century inhumanity meant cruelty; in the twentieth century it means schizoid self-alienation. The danger of the future is that men may become robots...” [70]

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Who does the future belong to?

Canadian Premier Pierre Trudeau (1919 — 2000): “...The twentieth century really belongs to those who will build it. The future can be promised to no one...” [70]

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Foreseeing the Future out of the Fossilized Past?

Edmund Burke (1729 – 1797, an Irish statesman, author, orator, political theorist, and philosopher): “...You can never plan the future by the past...” [70]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 347

In speaking of change and social systems’ reactions, it is wise to listen to Ralph Waldo Emerson: “...There are always two parties — the party of the past and the party of the future, the establishment and the movement....” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 348

As per the Oxford Dictionary, The Establishment refers to:

“...social group exercising authority or influence, and generally seeking to resist change...” [65]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 349

Theodore Roosevelt: “...All the resources we need are in the mind....” [7]

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A take regarding time progression and retrogression, Sir James Jeans establishes:

Sir James Jeans — English Astronomer, physicist, and mathematician — (1877 — 1946) :

“...Taking a very gloomy view of the future of the human race, let us suppose that it can only expect to survive for two thousand million years longer, a period about equal to the past age of the earth. Then, regarded as a being destined to live for three score-years and then humanity, although it has been born in a house seventy years old, is itself three days old....” [17]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 351

Dr. Malcolm Knowles Ph.D. addresses ignoramuses (also known as simpletons into outright fallacy) of supine ignorance:

“...The greatest danger for the survival of the present civilization is neither atomic war, nor environmental pollution, nor the exploitation of natural resources, and nor present crises. The underlying cause to all of the above is the acceleration of man’s obsolescence … The only hope seems to be an electroshock program to re-instill to the present adults the competencies required to function adequately under a mode of perpetual change. This is a profound need — the immeasurable challenge — that is presented by the modern society to adult education....” At http://bit.ly/1lcGtsH

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 352

The Disraeli’s wise take:

Benjamin Disraeli — British Prime Minister — (1804 — 1881): “...Conservatism discards Prescription, shrinks from Principle, disavows Progress; having rejected all respect for antiquity, it offers no redress for the present, and makes no preparation for the future...” [17]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 353

On education and to this end, Dr. Skinner made an important point.

Dr. Burrhus Frederic Skinner Ph.D. , “...Education is what survives when what has been learned has been forgotten....” [9]

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Is there a path to prevailing?

Ralph Waldo Emerson: “...That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do; not that the nature of the thing itself is changed, but that our power to do is increased....” [156]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 355

What is the inner-workings of time as per Orwell? Ensuing:

George Orwell (1903 — 1950): “...Who controls the future; who controls the present controls the past … If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face — forever...” [17]

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How can we state the bond between the future and past:

Eugene O’Neill (1888 — 1953): “...The only living life is in the past and future … the present is an interlude … strange interlude in which we call on past and future to bear witness we are living....” [17]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 357

Was Thomas Jefferson America’s first futurist? He proclaimed:

Thomas Jefferson: “...I am captivated more by dreams of the future than by history of the past....” [11]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 358

Bernard d'Espagnat: “...Even if the Universe is a little myopic is true that, more than others, MEN OF SCIENCE ARE ITS EYES....” [16]

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How do you operate the sensors of the sight?

Mark Twain: “...You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus....” [172]

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Drucker was blamed often of self-praising himself about his capability of foretelling the future. This is his take on it:

Peter Drucker: “...Things that have already happened but whose consequences have not been realized [because they were not imagined, considered, scrutinized or envisioned by disciplined foresight and far-sight extending and expanding both sides of the human brain] … Don’t confuse movement with progress....” [17] Brackets are mine.

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Reinforcing the motion by Dr. Watson, Edmund Burke (1729 — 1797) argues “...Education is the cheap defense of nations....” [152]

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Arthur C. Clarke: “...We have to abandon the idea that schooling is something restricted to youth. How can it be, in a world where half the things a man knows at 20 are no longer true at 40 — and half of the things he knows at 40 hadn’t been discovered when he was 20?...” [19]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 363

How do freedom, security, safety, reliability, reason coalesce and intertwine?

Sir Karl Popper argued: “...We must plan for freedom, and not only for security [and safety and reliability], if for no other reason than that only [exceedingly educated] freedom can make security secure [and safety safe and reliability reliable]...” [51] Brackets are mine.

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Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) made a relevant contribution to understanding the nature of swirling changes. I quote some of his excerpts:

“...Speed and constant motion are the hallmark characteristics of life in the twenty-first century. The driving / enabling force behind them is the technology that allows almost instant access to information, and with each advance in technology the concept of ‘fast’ is only going to get faster...”

And Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) added:

“...This access comes not only in the form of the ability to move data around the world in nanosecond (one billionth,10— 9, of a second), but also in the ability to sift through and manipulate it. Patterns and trends that were impossible to see in the days when information [based on throughput-ed numerical and narrative data] was housed in mainframe computers that required IT professionals to access, are now readily visible to anyone with a PC and a hookup who cares to apply a few screens...”

Subsequently, he continues:

“...Moreover, as technology shrinks the cycle between an action, a reaction and a re-reaction, it becomes possible for people who might otherwise never be in direct contact to engage in a nearly constant flow of dialogue. The result is not only that technicians in Bangalore, India, and Waukesha, Wisconsin, can seamlessly work on the same project, passing it off as the day ends in one hemisphere and begins in the other, but also that a newly hired consultant at EDS can have a meaningful dialogue via videos and e-mails with CEO Dick Brown about what he sees in his territory....”

And Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) observes:

“...Meanwhile, markets for goods and services and the capital markets change directions with astounding speed. Consumer trends [because of the multitude of driving forces that propels said forces] are in a state of constant flux as a flood of new products [and services] appears every day to supplant older ones that often have been around only a few months themselves....” Brackets are mine.

And he carries on:

“...Market expansions morph into contractions seemingly overnight. It isn’t that the cycles are getting closer together. The economic expansion of the 1990s was one of the longest in U.S. history. Rather, it is the momentum when they turn that has accelerated. On March 13, 2000, the NASDAQ composite index peak at 5132. By April 14, it slumped into 3265, a loss of nearly 40% in one month. In such a volatile environment, the ability to grow, shrink and redeploy assets quickly and intelligently is a critical competence for survival...”

And Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) asserts:

“...What has happened so far is just a preview. We have only scratched the surface in using the capabilities of the current technology, not to mention the new technologies and capabilities that are coming on stream every day...”

Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) points out as well:

“...The earliest uses of most new technologies are at making old processes work better. Once computers came out of the science labs, their first mainstream uses were for such things as automating accounting and inventory controls. These applications were valuable in that they got the bills out faster and let a company make better purchasing and scheduling decisions. But once you consider the activities required for entry and retrieval, some weren’t much more effective in terms of cost or time consumption than doing things the old way....”

In understanding scales and accurate senses of proportions and depth, Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) asserted in 2004:

“...The GDP of the developed world — the United States, European Community and Japan with a total population of about 750 million — is more than $23 trillion. The rest of the world, including China with 1.2 billion people and India with about 1.2 billion people and India with about 1 billion people, lives on less than $3 trillion in GDP. Take the world’s five largest companies, GE, Exxon/Mobil, Microsoft, Pfizer and Wal-Mart — their market capitalization is bigger than the GDP of India...”

As Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) concluded making his case. [42]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 365

To further set the stage for this material’s comprehension, the textbook “...Einstein in the Boardroom...” by Suzanne S. Harrison and Patrick H. Sullivan Sr. may offer some lucid ideas on the “...current...” state of affairs when they claim:

“...Humans have been adding to their total knowledge steadily over the centuries, and the amount of knowledge we create is multiplying at an incredible rate. BEGINNING WITH THE AMOUNT OF KNOWLEDGE IN THE KNOWN WORLD AT THE TIME OF CHRIST, STUDIES HAVE ESTIMATED THAT THE FIRST DOUBLING OF THAT KNOWLEDGE TOOK PLACE ABOUT 1700 A.D. THE SECOND DOUBLING OCCURRED AROUND THE YEAR 1900. IT IS ESTIMATED TODAY THAT THE WORLD'S KNOWLEDGE BASE WILL DOUBLE AGAIN BY 2010 AND AGAIN AFTER THAT BY 2013...” [37]

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In a treatise concerning the “...Principles of Human Knowledge,...” George Berkeley (1865 – 1753) sustains,

“...We have first raised a dust [science, technology and progress] and then complain [because our most determined decision of not taking our own education and acculturation further] we cannot see [understand the world upon which we dare to stand upon]...” [130] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 367

The American Heritage Dictionary’s Introduction (fourth edition, 2000) by Joseph P. Pickett, Executive Director, literally indicates, to further illustrate the reader, [54]:

“...This Fourth Edition of The American Heritage Dictionary combines the best of traditional making with key innovations that afford new ways of looking at our language… This edition has nearly 10,000 new words and senses that reflect the rapid pace of change in the English language today. Technological innovations in computing and communications along with advances in the sciences have been especially rich sources of development in the lexicon (for example, bit map, domain name, and raster in computing; dark matter, photonics, and yoctosecond in science). Medicine and medical research continue to produce an astonishing array of new terms for chemicals and substances (endostatin, leptin, transfatty acid), for disorders and infectious agents (Asperger’s syndrome, erectile dysfunction, hantavirus), for treatment (cocktail, molecular knife, xenotransplant), and for a variety of creations and discoveries (designer gene, enteric nervous system, microsleep) .... In addition, continuing social change in postindustrial society has given rise to expressions that describe new business practices (buyback, microcredit, reverse mortgage), a changing workplace (face time, job-share, mommy track), and evolving political positions and governmental policies (family leave, term limit, workfare). New sports terms have arisen (clap skate, five hole, skyboard), as have words for new educational practices (charter school, distance learning, homeschool). The names of foods from other cultures continue to be adopted (baba gannouj, garam masala, quesadilla). A host of new cultural developments has produced a host of new compound cords (assisted living, poetry slam, shock jock). And English speakers continue to be an exuberance force in creative coinage (bloviate, newbie, wannabe) .... To ensure accuracy in the coverage of our rapidly changing vocabulary, we have worked closely with distinguished consultants in a wide variety of specialized fields, including anthropology, astronomy, genetics, immunology, philosophy, and physics, to name but a few. We have also gone to great lengths to make our biological and geographic entries as timely as possible. Many new biographical entries have been added, especially in the areas of sports, music, film-making, and literature. To the geographic entries we have added new country names, such as Myanmar and the Republic of Congo, and newly prominent places such as Kosovo ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 368

Learning about the futures?

Virginia Postrel, “...the future is alive. Like the present, the future is not a single, uniform state but an ongoing process that reflects the plenitude of human life. There is in fact no single future; ‘the’ future encompasses the many microfutures of individuals and their associations. It includes all the things we learn about ourselves and the world, all the incremental improvements we discover, all our new ideas, and all the new ways we express and recombine them. As a system, the future is natural, out of anyone’s control, though is driven by the artificial: by individual attempts … This open-ended future can’t be contained in the vision of a single person or organization. And … it is something we can never be caught up with .... HOW WE FEEL ABOUT THE EVOLVING FUTURE TELLS US WHO WE ARE AS INDIVIDUALS AND AS A CIVILIZATION: DO WE SEARCH FOR STASIS ─A REGULATED, ENGINEERED WORLD? OR DO WE EMBRACE DYNAMISM─A WORLD OF CONSTANT CREATION, DISCOVERY, AND COMPETITION? DO WE VALUE STABILITY AND CONTROL, OR EVOLUTION AND LEARNING? … OR DO WE SEE TECHNOLOGY AS AN EXPRESSION OF HUMAN CREATIVITY AND THE FUTURE AS INVITING? DO WE THINK THAT PROGRESS REQUIRES A CENTRAL BLUEPRINT, OR DO WE SEE IT AS A DECENTRALIZED, EVOLUTIONARY PROCESS? DO WE CONSIDER MISTAKES PERMANENT DISASTERS, OR THE CORRECTABLE BY-PRODUCTS OF EXPERIMENTATION? DO WE CRAVE PREDICTABILITY, OR RELISH SURPRISE? THE TWO POLES, STASIS AND DYNAMISM, INCREASINGLY DEFINE OUR POLITICAL, INTELLECTUAL, AND CULTURAL LAND.Sc.APE. THE CENTRAL QUESTION OF OUR TIME IS WHAT TO DO ABOUT THE FUTURE. AND THAT QUESTION CREATES A DEEP DIVIDE....” [170]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 369

In speaking about science progression, new benefits and new hazards, here it is a summation by the English Crown’s top scientist, Sir Martin Rees.

Sir Martin Rees, Ph.D. : “...Science is emphatically not, as some have claimed, approaching its end; it is surging ahead at an accelerating rate. We are still flummoxed about the bedrock nature of physical reality, and the complexities of life, the brain, and the cosmos. New discoveries, illuminating all these mysteries, will engender benign applications; but will also pose new ethical dilemmas and bring new hazards. How will we balance the multifarious prospective benefits from genetics, robotics, or nanotechnology against the risk (albeit smaller) of triggering utter disaster? .... Science is advancing faster than ever, and on a broader front: bio-, cyber- and nanotechnology all offer exhilarating prospects; so does the exploration of space. But there is a dark side: new science can have unintended consequences; it empowers individuals to perpetrate acts of megaterror; even innocent errors could be catastrophic. The ‘downside’ from twenty-first century technology could be graver and more intractable than the threat of nuclear devastation that we have faced for decades. And human-induced pressures on the global environment may engender higher risks that the age-old hazards of earthquakes, eruptions, and asteroid impacts...” [120]

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Why seek ultimate truths under the underlying unturned rocks?

“...From knowledge of the rules each molecule obeys, we can predict the emergence of the structure and function of a material ─ a molecular society and, ultimately, a material culture. Beating heart muscle. Pollutant-filtering molecular sponges. Energy-harvesting solar cells .... Let us embark upon a journey into the world of nanotechnology. Let us see how far we have come in persuading Nature to fashion matter after our needs, in using refined control over atoms, electrons, and photons to better human existence. Let us examine how the latest breakthroughs are revolutionizing human health, environment, and information. Humbled before Nature’s achievements, let us inquire as to our limitations, and contemplate what responsibilities arise in the face of our new found abilities...” [194]

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Size, speed, dynamics, and novel realities?

“...Like Moore’s Law for silicon electronics, which says that computers are growing exponentially smaller and more powerful every year, molecular systems developed with DNA nanotechnology have been doubling in size roughly every three years,...” says Professor Erik Winfree at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). [197]

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Stephen M.R. Covey observes, “...the world’s fund of information now doubles every two to two and a half years...” [196]

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What is an example of one instituting resiliency?

Dr. Robert Collins, Ph.D. and his “...Ten Commandments of Resilience....” It here ensues the literal citation:

I.- Thou Shalt Have a Written Disaster Plan
II.- Thou Shalt Do Cost Benefit Analysis
III.- Thou Shalt Be Fully Insured
IV.- Thou Shalt Search Out and Repair Vulnerable Systems
V.- Thou Shalt Have Redundant Systems
VI.- Thou Shalt Be Mobile
VII.- Thou Shalt Set and Follow Priorities
VIII.- Thou Shalt Not Depend on Others
IX.- Thou Shalt Keep Lines of Communication Open
X.- Thou Shalt Capitalize on Opportunities

End of citation of the “...Ten Commandments of Resilience....” [125]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 374

Professor Vinge indicated it in 1993: “...Within thirty years, we will have the technological means to create superhuman intelligence. Shortly after, the human era will be ended …Is such progress avoidable? If not to be avoided, can events be guided so that we may survive? These questions are investigated. Some possible answers [and some further dangers] are presented...” Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 375

Is there some evidence about managing intelligence at the microbiological level?

“...In August of 2000, a Japanese scientist named Toshiyuki Nakagaki announce that he had trained an amoebalike organism called slim mold to find the shortest route through a maze. Nakagaki had placed the mold in a small maze comprising four possible routes and planted pieces of food at two of the exits. Despite its being an incredibly primitive organism (a close relative of ordinary fungi) with no centralized brain whatsoever, the slime mold managed to plot the most efficient route to the food, stretching its body through the maze so that it connected directly to the two food sources. Without any apparent cognitive resources, the slime mold had 'solved' the maze puzzle ... For such a simple organism, the slime mold has an impressive intellectual pedigree. Nakagaki's announcement was only the latest in a long chain of investigations into the subtleties of slime mold behavior. For scientists trying to understand systems that use relatively simple components to build higher-level intelligence, the slime mold may someday be seen as the equivalent of the finches and tortoises that Darwin observed on the Galáagos Islands ...” [212]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 376

A misbehaved future?

Virginia Postrel: “...The future we face at the dawn of the twenty-first century is, like all futures left to themselves, ‘emergent, complex messiness.’ Its ‘messiness’ lies not in disorder, but in an order that is unpredictable, spontaneous, and ever shifting, a pattern created by millions of uncoordinated, independent decisions. The pattern contains not just a few high-tech gizmos, but all the variegated aspects of life. As people create and sell products or services, adopt new fashions of speech or dress, form families and choose home towns, make medical decisions and seek spiritual insight, investigate the universe and invent new forms of art, these actions shape a future no one can see, A FUTURE THAT IS DYNAMICAL AND INHERENTLY UNSTABLE....” [170]

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“...I never discovered anything with my rational mind....” [111]

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Where is the strategic surprise ignored?

John Burdon Sanderson Haldane (1892 — 1964): “...I have no doubt that in reality the future will be vastly more surprising than anything I can imagine. Now my own suspicion is that the universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose....”

Earned in his own intellectual right, Thomas Jefferson most cogently stated:

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 379

They insist that the DNA molecule has been with us through billions of years. Ray Kurzweil proclaims that

“...by the 2030s, the nonbiological portion of our intelligence will predominate...”

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What is the world to be, under scenarios, looking like towards 2025?

On the trends to 2025, speaking of “...What Kind of Future?,...”

NIC argues, “...The above trends suggest major discontinuities, shocks, and surprises, which we highlight throughout the text. Examples include nuclear weapons use or a pandemic. In some cases, the surprise element is only a matter of timing: an energy transition, for example is inevitable; the only questions are when and how abruptly or smoothly such a transition occurs. An energy transition from one type of fuel (fossil fuels) to another (alternative) is an event that historically has only happened once a century at most with momentous consequences. The transition from wood to coal helped trigger industrialization. In this case, a transition—particularly an abrupt one—out of fossil fuels would have major repercussions for energy producers in the Middle East and Eurasia, potentially causing permanent decline of some states as global and regional powers .... Other discontinuities are less predictable. They are likely to result from an interaction of several trends and depend on the quality of leadership. We put uncertainties such as whether China or Russia becomes a democracy in this category. China’s growing middle class increases the chances but does not make such a development inevitable. Political pluralism seems less likely in Russia in the absence of economic diversification. Pressure from below may force the issue, or a leader might begin or enhance the democratization process to sustain the economy or spur economic growth. A sustained plunge in the price of oil and gas would alter the outlook and increase prospects for greater political and economic liberalization in Russia. If either country were to democratize, it would represent another wave of democratization with wide significance for many other developing states .... Also uncertain are the outcomes of demographic challenges facing Europe, Japan, and even Russia. In none of these cases does demography have to spell destiny with less regional and global power an inevitable outcome. Technology, the role of immigration, public health improvements, and laws encouraging greater female participation in the economy are some of the measures that could change the trajectory of current trends pointing toward less economic growth, increased social tensions, and possible decline .... Whether global institutions adapt and revive—another key uncertainty—also is a function of leadership. Current trends suggest a dispersion of power and authority will create a global governance deficit. Reversing those trend lines would require strong leadership in the international community by a number of powers, including the emerging ones .... Some uncertainties would have greater consequences—should they occur—than would others. In this work, we emphasize the overall potential for greater conflict—some forms of which could threaten globalization. We put WM.D. terrorism and a Middle East nuclear arms race in this category. The key uncertainties and possible impacts are discussed in the text and summarized in the textbox on page vii. In the four fictionalized scenarios, we have highlighted new challenges that could emerge as a result of the ongoing global transformation. They present new situations, dilemmas, or predicaments that represent departures from recent developments. As a set, they do not cover all possible futures. None of these is inevitable or even necessarily likely; but, as with many other uncertainties, the scenarios are potential game-changers...” [144]

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Subsequently, John Naisbitt puts it: “...You just have to hang out with the paradoxes, hang out with the contradictions until you understand them. When there is a perceived contradiction, I like to look for something that helps to resolve the contradiction. A lot of people have an either/or mentality. We get the Internet and everyone says, ‘Well newspapers are going to go away.’ It’s not either/or. There will be a change in the mix, that’s all....”

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In the same order of ideas, Hamel indicates: “...Look for dis-confirming evidence, for things that don’t fit, for things that don’t ajar....” [64]

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DARPA’s adage: “...If you’re not failing frequently, you’re not succeeding enough....”

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Diplomacy and peace?

What does Ambrose Bierce have to say about peace?: “...[Peace is,] in international affairs, a period of cheating between two periods of fighting...” [130] Brackets are mine.

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Winston Churchill argues in this regard: “...If the human race wishes to have a prolonged and indefinite period of material prosperity, they have only got to behave in a peaceful and helpful way toward one another...” [111]

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A PROMINENT MESSAGE ON LEADERSHIP FROM THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY:

St. Ignatius Loyola (1491 — 1556) — founder of the Jesuits — :

“...Teach us, good Lord, to serve Thee as Thou deservest;

To give and not to count the cost;

To fight and not to heed the wounds;

To toil and not to seek for rest;

To labour and not to ask for any reward

Save that of knowing that we do Thy will....”

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“...Predictions tend to be linear extrapolations; technological advances tend to throw curves. Predicting poorly one curved is already impossible enough without adding three more curves, to say nothing of the seven others neither of us considered, but which will actually play a more central role...” By Dr. Michael Fossel, Ph.D. , M.D.

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“...We are hanging eyes, ears and sensory organs on our computers and on our networks asking them to observe the physical world on our behalf and to manipulate it. The more you connect computers to the physical world the more the issue of interaction becomes important...” (Attributed to Corporate Design Foundation: May 1991). [195]

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ULTIMATE LUMINARIES ON MOST ADVANCED INTELLIGENCE AND TECHNOLOGICAL PROGRESSION (AS OF 2007). ENSUING TWENTY-FOUR ASSERTIONS:

[1 of 24] “...Some people say that computers can never show true intelligence, whatever that may be. But it seems to me that if very complicated chemical molecules can operate in humans to make them intelligent, then equally complicated electronic circuits can also make computers act in an intelligent way. And if they are intelligent, they can presumably design computers that have even greater complexity and intelligence...” ─ By Dr. Stephen Hawking (Lucasian Professor of Mathematics, University of Cambridge).

[2 of 24] “...One consideration that should be taken into account when deciding whether to promote the development of superintelligence is that if superintelligence is feasible, it will likely be developed sooner or later. Therefore, we will probably one day have to take the gamble of superintelligence no matter what. But once in existence, a superintelligence could help us reduce or eliminate other existential risks, such as the risk that advanced nanotechnology will be used by humans in warfare or terrorism, a serious threat to the long-term survival of intelligent life on earth. If we get to superintelligence first, we may avoid this risk from nanotechnology and many others. If, on the other hand, we get nanotechnology first, we will have to face both the risks from nanotechnology and, if these risks are survived, also the risks from superintelligence. The overall risk seems to be minimized by implementing superintelligence, with great care, as soon as possible...” ─ By Dr. Nick Bostrom (Director, Future of Humanity Institute, Oxford University).

[3 of 24] “...We have a hard time motivating people to do stuff in the service of abstract nouns like 'liberty,' but 'singularity' is so abstract as to make 'liberty' seem as concrete as 'imminent car-wreck.' The singularity needs to be the mere abstract cherry on the concrete cake: the funny curiosity to consider as the end-point of a bunch of imminent, relevant, concrete changes in our lives that we need to prepare for and prepare the way for...” ─ By Cory Doctorow (Science Fiction Author, Boing Boing Co-Editor).

[4 of 24] “...To any thoughtful person, the singularity idea, even if it seems wild, raises a gigantic, swirling cloud of profound and vital questions about humanity and the powerful technologies it is producing. Given this mysterious and rapidly approaching cloud, there can be no doubt that the time has come for the scientific and technological community to seriously try to figure out what is on humanity's collective horizon. Not to do so would be hugely irresponsible...” ─ By Dr. Douglas R. Hofstadter (College Professor Of Cognitive and Computer Science, Indiana University, Bloomington).

[5 of 24] “...What, then, is the Singularity? It's a future period during which the pace of technological change will be so rapid, its impact so deep, that human life will be irreversibly transformed. Although neither utopian or dystopian, this epoch will transform the concepts that we rely on to give meaning to our lives, from our business models to the cycle of human life, including death itself. Understanding the Singularity will alter our perspective on the significance of our past and the ramifications for our future. To truly understand it inherently changes one's view of life in general and one's own particular life. I regard someone who understands the Singularity and who has reflected on its implications for his or her own life as a '…singularitarian…'...” ─ By Ray Kurzweil (CEO, Kurzweil Technologies).

[6 of 24] “...The Singularity is a frightening prospect for humanity. I assume that we will somehow dodge it or finesse it in reality, and one way to do that is to warn about it early and begin to build in correctives...” ─ By Stewart Brand (Founder and Chairman, The Long Now Foundation).

[7 of 24] “...It is clear from my work that to tell a truly compelling story, a machine would need to understand the 'inner lives' of his or her characters. And to do that, it would need not only to think mechanically in the sense of swift calculation (the forte of supercomputers like Deep Blue), it would also need to think experientially in the sense of having subjective or phenomenal awareness. For example, a person can think experientially about a trip to Europe as a kid, remember what it was like to be in Paris on a sunny day with an older brother, smash a drive down a fairway, feel a lover's touch, ski on the edge, or need a good night's sleep. But any such example, I claim, will demand capabilities no machine will ever have. Renowned human storytellers understand this concept. For example, playwright Henrik Ibsen said: ' … I have to have the character in mind through and through, I must penetrate into the last wrinkle of his soul ...' Such a modus operandi is forever closed off to a machine...” ─ By Dr. Selmer Bringsjord (Director, Rensselaer AI & Reasoning Laboratory).

[8 of 24] “...There's this stupid myth out there that AI has failed, but AI is everywhere around you every second of the day. People just don't notice it. You've got AI systems in cars, tuning the parameters of the fuel injection systems. When you land in an airplane, your gate gets chosen by an AI scheduling system. Every time you use a piece of Microsoft software, you've got an AI system trying to figure out what you're doing, like writing a letter, and it does a pretty damned good job. Every time you see a movie with computer–generated characters, they're all little AI characters behaving as a group. Every time you play a video game, you're playing against an AI system...” ─ By Dr. Rodney Brooks (Director, MIT Computer Science and AI Laboratory, Chief Technical Officer, IROBOT CORPORATION).

[9 of 24] “...If there is a key driving force pushing towards a singularity, it's international competition for power. This ongoing struggle for power and security is why, in my view, attempts to prevent a singularity simply by international fiat are doomed. The potential capabilities of transformative technologies are simply staggering. No nation will risk falling behind its competitors, regardless of treaties or UN resolutions banning intelligent machines or molecular–scale tools. The uncontrolled global transformation these technologies may spark is, in strategic terms, far less of a threat than an opponent having a decided advantage in their development ─ a 'singularity gap,' if you will. The 'missile gap' that drove the early days of the nuclear arms race would pale in comparison...” ─ By Jamais Cascio (Senior Contributing Editor, WORLDCHANGING).

[10 of 24] “...The world is Organized by embodied beings like us to be coped with by beings like us. The computer would be totally lost in our world. It would have to have in it a model of the world and a model of the body, which AI researchers have tried, but it's certainly hopeless. Without that, the world is just utterly un-graspable by computers .... The truth is that human intelligence can never be replaced with machine intelligence simply because we are not ourselves thinking machines. Each of us has, and uses every day, a power of intuitive intelligence that enables us to understand, to speak, and to cope skillfully with our everyday environment...” ─ By Dr. Hubert Dreyfus (Professor of Philosophy, University of California, Berkeley).

[11 of 24] “...If you invent a breakthrough in artificial intelligence, so machines can learn, that is worth 10 Microsofts...” ─ By Bill Gates (Chairman and Chief Software Architect, Microsoft Corporation).

[12 of 24] “...There is no good reason to believe that the emergence of the modern human mind is the end state of the evolution of psyche. Indeed, the rub is this: While evolution might take millions of years to generate another psychological sea change as dramatic as the emergence of modern humanity, technology may do the job much more expediently. The Singularity can be expected to induce rapid and dramatic change in the nature of life, mind and experience...” ─ By Dr. Ben Goertzel (CEO, Novamente LLC).

[13 of 24] “...It's haughty of us to think we're the end product of evolution. All of us are a part of producing whatever is coming next. We're at an exciting time. We're close to the singularity. Go back to that litany of chemistry leading to single–celled organisms, leading to intelligence. The first step took a billion years, the next step took a hundred million, and so on. We're at a stage where things change on the order of decades, and it seems to be speeding up. Technology has the autocatalytic effect of fast computers, which let us design better and faster computers faster. We're heading toward something which is going to happen very soon – in our lifetimes – and which is fundamentally different from anything that's happened in human history before...” ─ By Dr. W. Daniel Hillis (Chairman and Chief Technology Officer, Applied Minds).

[14 of 24] “...The 21st–century technologies — genetics, nanotechnology, and robotics (GNR) – are so powerful that they can spawn whole new classes of accidents and abuses. Most dangerously, for the first time, these accidents and abuses are widely within the reach of individuals or small groups. They will not require large facilities or rare raw materials. Knowledge alone will enable the use of them. Thus we have the possibility not just of weapons of mass destruction but of knowledge–enabled mass destruction (KM.D. ), this destructiveness hugely amplified by the power of self–replication. I think it is no exaggeration to say we are on the cusp of the further perfection of extreme evil, an evil whose possibility spreads well beyond that which weapons of mass destruction bequeathed to the nation–states, on to a surprising and terrible empowerment of extreme individuals...” ─ By Bill Joy (Managing Partner, Kleiner, Perkins, Caufields & Byers).

[15 of 24] “...Every cybernetic totalist fantasy relies on artificial intelligence. It might not immediately be apparent why such fantasies are essential to those who have them. If computers are to become smart enough to design their own successors, initiating a process that will lead to God-like omniscience after a number of ever-swifter passages from one generation of computers to the next, someone is going to have to write the software that gets the process going, and humans have given absolutely no evidence of being able to write such software. So the idea is that the computers will somehow become smart on their own and write their own software ... My primary objection to this way of thinking is pragmatic: It results in the creation of poor-quality real-world software in the present. Cybernetic totalists live with their heads in the future and are willing to accept obvious flaws in present software in support of a fantasy world that might never appear ... The whole enterprise of artificial intelligence is based on an intellectual mistake, and continues to expensively turn out poorly designed software as it is remarketed under a new name for every new generation of programmers...” ─ By Jaron Lanier (Computer Scientist, Composer, Visual Artist, and Author).

[16 of 24] “... ... Two quite detailed scenarios have emerged, one the Moravec/Kurzweil scenario, which we might call the 'Out to Pasture in the Elysian Fields,' that foresees machines as intelligent as humans, maybe more so, in 50 years and on the whole, a good thing. This leads to questions both Moravec and Kurzweil, to their credit, raise about whether those machines will take over for us (or from us), the basis of the second scenario, Bill Joy's quite opposite and dark vision, which posits the same improvement in machine intelligence, but with a horrifying outcome, the '…NanoGenRoboNightmare ... ' Some believers in the Elysian fields scenario have been arguing about 'the singularity,' borrowed from science fiction writer Vernor Vinge, the moment AI becomes powerful and ubiquitous enough so that all of the rules change and there's no going back. [...] I don't consider either of these scenarios implausible...” Pamela McCorduck (Author of Machines Who Think).

[17 of 24] “...We need to do an unlikely thing: we need to survey the world we now inhabit and proclaim it good. Good enough. Not in every detail; there are a thousand improvements, technological and cultural, that we can and should still make. But good enough in its outlines, in its essentials. We need to decide that we live, most of us in the West, long enough. We need to declare that, in the West, where few of us work ourselves to the bone, we have ease enough. In societies where most of us need storage lockers more than we need nanotech miracle boxes, we need to declare that we have enough stuff. Enough intelligence. Enough capability. Enough...” ─ By Bill McKibben (Author, Enough: Staying Human In An Engineered Age.)

[18 of 24] “...Only a small community has concentrated on general intelligence. No one has tried to make a thinking machine and then teach it chess — or the very sophisticated oriental board game Go. [...] The bottom line is that we really haven't progressed too far toward a truly intelligent machine. We have collections of dumb specialists in small domains; the true majesty of general intelligence still awaits our attack. [...] We have got to get back to the deepest questions of AI and general intelligence and quit wasting time on little projects that don't contribute to the main goal...” ─ By Dr. Marvin Minsky (Toshiba Professor, Media Arts and Sciences, MIT).

[19 of 24] “...It may seem rash to expect fully intelligent machines in a few decades, when the computers have barely matched insect mentality in a half–century of development. Indeed, for that reason, many long–time artificial intelligence researchers scoff at the suggestion, and offer a few centuries as a more believable period. But there are very good reasons why things will go much faster in the next fifty years than they have in the last fifty... Since 1990, the power available to individual AI and robotics programs has doubled yearly, to 30 MIPS (machine instructions per second) by 1994 and 500 MIPS by 1998. Seeds long ago alleged barren are suddenly sprouting. Machines read text, recognize speech, even translate languages. Robots drive cross–country, crawl across Mars, and trundle down office corridors. In 1996 a theorem–proving program called EQP running five weeks on a 50 MIPS computer at Argonne National Laboratory found a proof of a Boolean algebra conjecture by Herbert Robbins that had eluded mathematicians for sixty years. And it is still only Spring. Wait until Summer...” ─ By Dr. Hans Moravec (Chief Scientist, Seegrid Corporation).

[20 of 24] “...In the end, this search for ways to enhance ourselves is a natural part of being human. The urge to transform ourselves has been a force in history as far back as we can see. It's been selected for by millions of years of evolution. It's wired deep in our genes — a natural outgrowth of our human intelligence, curiosity, and drive. To turn our backs on this power would be to turn our backs on our true nature. Embracing our quest to understand and improve on ourselves doesn't call into question our humanity — it reaffirms it...” ─ By Ramez Naam (Author of More Than Human: Embracing The Promise of Biological Enhancement, Software Developer, Microsoft).

[21 of 24] “...I want to focus on a different aspect of Ken MacLeod's 'Rapture of the Nerds' comment, because I actually think it cuts both ways. Yes, it's possible to draw parallels between the Christian idea of The Rapture — and, even more generally, between religious ideas of transcendence generally — and the notion that, once human technology passes a certain threshold, roughly that described by Vinge and other singularity enthusiasts, human beings will potentially enjoy the kind of powers and pleasures traditionally assigned to gods or beings in heaven: Limitless lifespans, if not immortality, superhuman powers, virtually limitless wealth, fleshly pleasures on demand, etc. .... These do sound like the sorts of things that religions have promised their followers throughout human history. That leads some who invoke MacLeod's comment to contend that because singularity enthusiasts hope for the same kinds of things that religious believers have hoped for, singularity enthusiasts are merely adherents to a new sort of religion, the religion of science ... But as Isaac Asimov has noted, the religion of science is distinguished by one chief characteristic: 'that it works.' I express no opinion on whether science will actually deliver on these hopes. But I note that people once looked to supernatural sources for such now-mundane things as cures for baldness or impotence, only to find those desires satisfied, instead, by modern pharmacology. Yet that hardly makes those who place their faith in pharmacology members of a religion — or, if it does, it makes them members of a religion that is distinguishable from those dependent on the supernatural...” ─ By Glenn Harland Reynolds (Professor of Law, University of Tennessee)

[22 of 24] “...'…Could a machine think?...' My own view is that only a machine could think, and indeed only very special kinds of machines, namely brains and machines that had the same causal powers as brains. And that is the main reason strong AI has had little to tell us about thinking, since it has nothing to tell us about machines. By its own definition, it is about programs, and programs are not machines. Whatever else intentionality is, it is a biological phenomenon, and it is as likely to be as causally dependent on the specific biochemistry of its origins as lactation, photosynthesis, or any other biological phenomena. No one would suppose that we could produce milk and sugar by running a computer simulation of the formal sequences in lactation and photosynthesis, but where the mind is concerned many people are willing to believe in such a miracle because of a deep and abiding dualism: the mind they suppose is a matter of formal processes and is independent of quite specific material causes in the way that milk and sugar are not.....” ─ By Dr. John Searle (Slusser Professor of Philosophy, University of California, Berkeley).

[23 of 24] “...Before the invention of writing, almost every insight was happening for the first time (at least to the knowledge of the small groups of humans involved). When you are at the beginning, everything is new. In our era, almost everything we do in the arts is done with awareness of what has been done before. In the early post–human era, things will be new again because anything that requires greater than human ability has not already been done by Homer or da Vinci or Shakespeare...” ─ By Dr. Vernor Vinge (Mathematician, Computer Scientists, and Science Fiction Author).

[24 of 24] “...I certainly think that humans are not the limit of evolutionary complexity. There may indeed be post–human entities, either organic or silicon–based, which can in some respects surpass what a human can do. I think it would be rather surprising if our mental capacities were matched to understanding all the keys levels of reality. The chimpanzees certainly aren't, so why should ours be either? So there may be levels that will have to await some post-human emergence...” ─ By Sir Martin Rees (Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics, Trinity College). [200]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 390

Incidentally, Every Scientific and Technological Progression available and that is into a '' ...doubling ...” magnitude is synthesized her:

Doubling A:

“... HUMAN KNOWLEDGE IS DOUBLING EVERY TEN YEARS [AS PER THE 1998 STANDARDS]. In the past decade, more scientific knowledge has been created than in all of human history ...” (http://bit.ly/1nOc5Xm ). Brackets are mine.

Doubling B:

“... COMPUTER POWER IS DOUBLING EVERY EIGHTEEN MONTHS. THE INTERNET IS DOUBLING EVERY YEAR. THE NUMBER OF DNA SEQUENCES WE CAN ANALYZE IS DOUBLING EVERY TWO YEARS ...” (http://bit.ly/1gn4CdX )

Doubling C:

“ ...IN FACT, BECAUSE BOTH COMPUTER POWER AND DNA SEQUENCING DOUBLE ROUGHLY EVERY TWO YEARS, ONE CAN COMPUTE THE ROUGH TIME FRAME OVER WHICH MANY SCIENTIFIC BREAKTHROUGHS WILL TAKE PLACE .... BY 2020 ...” (http://bit.ly/1lZQ1Vc)

Doubling D:

“...SCIENTIFIC MANPOWER IS DOUBLING EVERY 12 YEARS IN A RATE OF GROWTH MORE THAN THREE TIMES THAT OF OUR POPULATION AS A WHOLE, DESPITE THAT, THE VAST STRETCHES OF THE UNKNOWN AND THE UNANSWERED AND THE UNFINISHED STILL FAR OUTSTRIP OUR COLLECTIVE COMPREHENSION...” [80] (http://1.usa.gov/1eyRLTK).

Doubling E:

“ ...THE FIRST DOUBLING OF THAT KNOWLEDGE TOOK PLACE ABOUT 1700 A.D. THE SECOND DOUBLING OCCURRED AROUND THE YEAR 1900. IT IS ESTIMATED TODAY THAT THE WORLD'S KNOWLEDGE BASE WILL DOUBLE AGAIN BY 2010 AND AGAIN AFTER THAT BY 2013...” [37] (http://bit.ly/1iptmkn).

Doubling F:

“...[THERE IS A] DOUBLING EVERY TWO YEARS [REGARDING THE TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT OF] SOLAR ENERGY BY APPLYING NANOTECHNOLOGY TO SOLAR PANELS...” [177] (http://bit.ly/1jgckIJ). Brackets are mine.

Doubling G:

“...NANO-GENETIC SEQUENCING DATA … IS DOUBLING EVERY YEAR...” [177] (http://slidesha.re/1f3MUH2).

Doubling I:

“...KNOWLEDGE IS DOUBLING BY EVERY FOURTEEN MONTHS...” [177] (http://bit.ly/1dc8Zb4).

Doubling J:

“...MORE THAN THE DOUBLING OF COMPUTATIONAL POWER [IS TAKING PLACE] EVERY YEAR...” [177] (http://bit.ly/1mn8Btl). Brackets are mine.

Doubling K:

“...Like Moore’s Law for silicon electronics, which says that computers are growing exponentially smaller and more powerful every year, molecular systems developed with DNA nanotechnology have been doubling in size roughly every three years,...” says Professor Erik Winfree at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). [197] (http://bit.ly/1f3NEMq).

AUTHOR:

Mr. Andres Agostini

www.linkedin.com/in/AndresAgostini

The Future of Scientific Management, Today! At http://lnkd.in/bYP2nDC

http://lnkd.in/WUm7zA or http://ThisSuccess.wordpress.com

The Future of Space-Age Risk Management: Transformative and Integrative Risk Management!
By Mr. Andres Agostini. At https://lifeboat.com/blog/2014/03/omniscentia

AS A CONSULTANT, MANAGER, STRATEGIST AND RESEARCHER, ANDRES WORKS AND HAS WORKED WITH INSTITUTIONS ─ AND THE RESPECTIVE EXECUTIVES OF SAID ORGANIZATIONS ─ SUCH AS:

► Toyota,
► Mitsubishi,
► World Bank,
► Shell,
► Statoil,
► Total,
► Exxon,
► Mobil,
► PDVSA, Citgo,
► GE,
► GMAC,
► TNT Express,
► AT&T
► GTE,
► Amoco,
► BP,
► Abbot Laboratories,
► World Health Organization,
► Ernst Young Consulting,
► SAIC (Science Applications International Corporation),
► Pak Mail,
► Wilpro Energy Services,
► Phillips Petroleum Company,
► Dupont,
► Conoco,
► ENI (Italy’s petroleum state-owned firm),
► Chevron,
► LDG Management (HCC Benefits).
Annotated Bibliography.

NB: All links and web addresses were checked and verified to be correct at the time of publication. Because of the dynamical nature of the web, some addresses and links may have changed since publication and may no longer be valid.

[1] Every quotation and/or citation is attributed to the mentioned author of said quotation.
[2] Sir Francis Bacon (Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1
[3] Dr. Bertrand Russell (Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1)
[4] Dr. Albert Einstein (Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1)
[5] Dr. Buckminster Fuller (Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1) and at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[6] Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1) and at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[7] Theodore Roosevelt at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[8] Ralph Waldo Emerson at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[9] Dr. Malcolm Knowles at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[10] Dr. Albert Einstein at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[11] Thomas Jefferson at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[12] Dr. Henry Kissinger at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[13] Sir Winston Churchill at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[14] Antonio Machado from Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1.
[15] The Panchatantra (body of Eastern philosophical knowledge) from Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1. And at << http://bit.ly/bj0rI1 >>
[16] Bernard d'Espagnat from Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1.
[17] Peter Drucker from Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1.
[18] Dr. James D. Watson, Ph.D. as he was interviewed by Charlie Rose most recently in year 2009.
[19] Arthur C. Clarke at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[20] Otto Herman Khan at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[21] General Francisco de Miranda from Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1.
[22] James Canton, “...Technofutures: How Leading-Edge Innovations Will Transform Business in the 21st Century...” by James Canton (http://amzn.to/bYrN8q )
[23] “...Revolutionary Wealth: How it will be created and how it will change our lives...” by Alvin Toffler and Heidi Toffler (ISBN-10: 038552207X)
[24] Ella Wheeler Wilcox at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[25] “...Future Shock...” by Alvin Toffler (ISBN-10: 0553277375)
[26] “...Fantastic Voyage: Live Long Enough to Live Forever...” by Ray Kurzweil and Terry Grossman ( ISBN-10: 0140282025 )
[27] “...Transcend: Nine Steps to Living Well Forever...” by Ray Kurzweil Ph.D. and Terry Grossman M.D. (ISBN-10: 1605299561)
[28] “...Leading the Revolution...” by Gary Hamel (ISBN-10: 1591391466)
[29] “...Emotional Intelligence...” by Daniel Goleman (ISBN-10:055309503X )
[30] Criss-cross at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[31] Crinkum-crankum at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[32] Terzetto at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[33] Thé dansant at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[34] Tertium quid at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[35] Computronium at http://bit.ly/bvf2AE
[36] Futureketing at http://bit.ly/aP2VlF
[37] “...Einstein in the Boardroom...” by Suzanne S. Harrison and Patrick H. Sullivan Sr. (ISBN-10: 0-471-70332-X
[38] Tête-à-tête at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[39] Dilettantes and poseurs at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[40] “...Why Mars and Venus Collide: Improving Relationships by Understanding How Men and Women Cope Differently with Stress...” by John Gray.
[41] Multiverse at http://bit.ly/2FTBYa
[42] “...The Cycle of Leadership...” by Noel M. Tichy (ISBN0-06-662056-2)
[43] Herman Kahn’s quotations at http://bit.ly/bgxeP0
[44] “...Innovate Like Edison: The Five-Step System for Breakthrough Business Success...” By Michael J. Gelb (ISBN-10: 0452289823)
[45] Déclassé at Oxford Dictionary (ISBN 0-19-861122-6)
[46] Démodé at Oxford Dictionary (ISBN 0-19-861122-6)
[47] Richard Buckminster Fuller at http://bit.ly/amahEh
[48] Yoctosecond, definition of, at http://bit.ly/c5ZMZS
[49] Dr. Pangloss at http://bit.ly/b5LkXL
[50] “...Monster of omniscience...” at page V, first paragraph, Concise Oxford Dictionary (ISBN 0-19-861122-6). Also viewable online at http://bit.ly/Omniscience-Monter-Bibliography
[51] Quotations by Karl Popper at http://bit.ly/d9GdeX
[52] “...Radical Evolution...” by Joel Garreau (ISBN0-385-50965-0).
[53] Definition of “...throughput....” Throughput: Output or production, as of a computer program, over a period of time. The quantity or amount of raw material processed within a given time, esp. the work done by an electronic computer in a given period of time. An amount of work, etc. done in a particular period of time. Volume of data or material handled: the amount of something such as data or raw material that is processed over a given period.
[54] The American Heritage Dictionary’s (fourth edition, 2000)— ISBN 0-395-82517-2
[55] By John F. Kennedy, Address at Rice University on the Nation's Space Effort Delivered in Houston, Texas, September 12, 1962. SOURCE: http://bit.ly/ckBJ4r (seen on June 12, 2007).
[56] “...The Art of The Long View...” ─ ISBN 0-385-26731-2
[57] “...The New Religion of Risk Management...” by Peter L. Bernstein, Harvard Business Review, March-April 1996.
[58] As quoted in title ─ ISBN 978-980-293-503-1
[59] As cited by David Jay's 2006 textbook, “...Mavericks of Medicine...” (ISBN: 1-890572-19-5)
[60] http://bit.ly/LuNRa
[61] Einstein “...on being smart...” at http://bit.ly/EZMFj
[62] “...A Devil’s Dictionary of Business...” (2005) — ISBN 1-56025-712-1 by Nicholas von Hoffman
[63] Original source: http://bit.ly/aEmAkO
[64] Textbook: “...Leading The Revolution...” (ISBN 1-57851-189-5), year 2000, by Gary Hamel
[65] Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[66] Textbook known as “...A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations...” by Alan L. Mackay (ISBN-10: 075031066) in 1991.
[67] Dr. Stephen Hawking was interviewed by CNN's journalist Becky Anderson in year 2009.
[68] http://bit.ly/9aLCB4
[69] “...A Dictionary of scientific quotations...” By Alan Lindsay Mackay - ISBN-10: 0750301066
[70] The Oxford dictionary of quotations - ISBN-10: 0199237174
[71] “...The Book of Positive Quotations,...” 2nd Edition (2007) — ISBN-10: 1577491696
[72] “...The Yale Book Of Quotations...” by Fred R. Shapiro (2006) — ISBN-10: 0300107986
[73] Well said, well spoken: 736 quotable quotes for educators by Robert D. Ramsey (1999) — ISBN-10: 0060194111
[74] Compelling conversations: questions and quotations on timeless topics by Erin Hermann Roth (2007) — ISBN-10: 141965828X
[75] Wit and Wisdom of the American Presidents: A Book of Quotations by Joslyn T. Pine (2000) - ISN-10: 0486414272
[76] The Routledge Dictionary Of Latin Quotations by Jon R. Stone (2004) ISBN-10: 0415969085
[77] Quote Unquote by M.P. Singh (2004) — ISBN: 1557099405
[78] “...Inevitable Surprises: Thinking Ahead in a Time of Turbulence...” by Peter Schwartz (2004) — ISBN-10: 1592400698
[79] “...Mind Set...” by John Naisbitt (2008) — ISBN-10: 0061136891
[80] http://bit.ly/2lvo4q
[81] As per David Jay Brown’s text book “...Mavericks of Medicine...” (2006) — ISBN 1-890572-19-5
[82] Singularity: Webster's Quotations, Facts and Phrases By Inc Icon Group International.
[83] http://bit.ly/b3aBN4
[84] Cumputronium at Wikipedia at http://bit.ly/4zTEHn
[85] Multiverse at Wikipedia at http://bit.ly/2FTBYa
[86] James N. Gardner’s “...The Intelligent Universe...” (2007) — ISBN-13: 978-1564149190
[87] Gary Hamel’s textbook “...Competing for the Future...” (1996) — ISBN-10: 0875847161
[88] Gary Hamel’s “...Leading The Revolution...” book — ISBN-10: 1591391466
[89] Eamonn kelly’s book “...Powerful Times...” (2006) — ISBN 0-131-85520-4
[90] http://bit.ly/bLrAOk (bibliography to Fuzzy Logic and Quantum Mechanics)
[91] As cited on “...The Juran Prescription...” by Kathleen Jennison Goonan, M.D. — ISBN 0—7879-0096
[92] Http://Futureketing.blogspot.com/
[93] http://bit.ly/Past_Vs_Now
[94] http://bit.ly/Industrial-Military-Complex
[95] The State Of The University: Academic Knowledges And The Knowledge Of God (2007) By Stanley Hauerwas, B.D. M.A. M.Phil and Ph.D. — ISBN-10: 0300057253
[96] http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Future
[97] http://www.wfs.org/forecasts.htm
[98] In the Book “...How We Decide...” (2009) by Jonah Lehrer — ISBN 978-0-618-62011-1
[99] “...Managing Risk: Systematic Loss Prevention for Executives...” (1987) — ISBN 0-13-551110-0 by Dr. Vernon Grose, D.Sc.
[100] http://bit.ly/9xPbxJ
[101] http://bit.ly/9yTWk5
[102] Adam Gordon in Book “...Future Savvy ...” ( 2008 ) — ISBN-10: 0814409121
[103] J. Scott Armstrong in book “...Principles of Forecasting...” — ISBN: 0792379306
[104] Bob Seidensticker's book "Future Hype..." (2006) — ISBN-10: 1576753700
[105] Dr. Philip Zimbardo, Ph.D. ’s book “...The Time Paradox...” (2009) — ISBN-10: 1416541993
[106] Hans Moravec’s “...Mind Children: The Future of Robot and Human Intelligence...” (1990) — ISBN-10: 06745761187
[107] David Jay Brown’s “...Mavericks of Medicine...” (2006) — ISBN: 1-890572-19-5
[108] Quotations under this number either has been sent to me via e-mail or have emerged as a result of private interviews.
[109] http://bit.ly/9P6HHB
[110] http://bit.ly/be9kE4
[111] Quotations at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[112] The Adult Learner, Sixth Edition: The Definitive Classic in Adult Education and Human Resource Development by Malcolm S. Knowles Ph.D. (2005) — ISBN-10: 0750678372
[113] Napoleon Bonaparte: A Life By Alan Schom (1998) — ISBN-10: 0060929588
[114] “...Science But Not Scientists...” By Vernon Grose (2006) — ISBN-10: 1425969917
[115] Http://www.jfklibrary.org/
[116] Http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/
[117] Gerard K. O’Neill’s “...The High Frontier...” (2000) — ISBN-10: 189652267x
[118] "Life's Solution: Inevitable Humans in a Lonely Universe" by Simon Conway Morris, Ph.D. — ( 2004) — ISBN-10: 0521603250
[119] “...Frases Celebres Para Toda Ocasión...” (In Spanish, “...Famous Sentences For Every Occasion) ─ (1993) By Rafael Escandon — ISBN 968-13-1285-6
[120] “...Our Final Hour...” (2003) By Sir Martin Rees — ISBN 0-465-0682-6
[121] http://bit.ly/xXGMf
[122] http://bit.ly/aMQjdV
[123] “...A Risk Management Approach to Business Continuity: Aligning Business Continuity with Corporate Governance...” (2006) — ISBN: 1931332363
[124] Dr. Robert A. Collins, Ph.D. ’s “...Resilience: Protecting your Business from Disasters in a Dangerous World...” (2007) — ISBN-10: 0595409245
[125] “...Thinking in Technical Analysis...” (2000) By Rick Bensignor— ISBN-10: 1576600491
[126] http://linkd.in/chnhzH
[127] Source: “...Against The Gods...” (1998 ) ‭— By Peter L. Bernstein ‭— ISBN: 0-471-29563-9
[128] http://bit.ly/9h9prC
[129] Quotations and citations that are solely under the own and utter discernment and intellectual faculties of the present author. Among many amenities that are described in my biography, I am a perpetual and ruthless researcher.
[130] “...Diccionario de Citas...” (Spanish, “...Dictionary of Quotations...”) by Castañares y Quiroz ─ ISBN 84-87462-03-0
[131] Respondent’s answers are in actuality own quotations of those authors, whose citations are accurate and available at <<www.brainyquote.com>>.
[132] http://bit.ly/mB6Oo
[133] “...Principles of Counseling and Psychotherapy: Learning the Essential Domains and Nonlinear Thinking of Master Practitioner...” (2009) ─ Gerald J. Mozdziers, Paul R. Peluso, Joseph Lisiecki ─ ISBN-10: 0415997518
[134] “...Cracking Creativity...” by Michael Michalko ─ ISBN 1-58008-311-0
[135] “...The Definitive Handbook of Business Continuity Management...” (2007) By Andrew Hiles ─ ISBN 0470516380
[136] Ray Kurzweil’s quotations at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[137] http://bit.ly/9BWSVQ
[138] http://bit.ly/bCOZDF
[139] “...The World is Flat...” By Thomas L. Friedman (2006) ─ ISBN-10: 0-374-29279-5
[140] “...Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative...” (2001) By Ken Robinson – ISBN-10: 1841121258
[141] http://bit.ly/NfD8z
[142] The Singularity is Near (2005) by Ray Kurzweil ─ ISBN 0-670-03384-7
[143] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_V._Gerstner,_Jr.
[144] www.dni.gov/nic/NIC_2025_project.html
[145] http://www.saffo.com/
[146] http://www.monitorinstitute.com/
[147] http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Alvin_Toffler
[148] http://www.brainyquotes.com/quotes/authors/a/alvin_toffler.html
[149] http://bit.ly/9gQMiY
[150] http://slidesha.re/9CN0mO
[151] http://bit.ly/10V0Xm
[152] http://bit.ly/dWw04
[153] The 8th Habit (2004) By Dr. Stephen R. Covey ─ ISBN 0-684-84665-9
[154] Blown to Bits: How the New Economics of Information Transforms Strategy (1999) ─ ISBN-10: 087584877X By Thomas S. Wurster
[155] Blown to Bits: Your Life, Liberty, and Happiness (2008) ─ ISBN-10: 0137135599 By Hal Abelson
[156] http://bit.ly/a3oaUk
[157] “...The Failure of Risk Management...” (2009) ─ ISBN-10: 0470387955 By Douglas W. Hubbard
[158] http://www.thefreedictionary.com/futurism
[159] http://www.thefreedictionary.com/futurology
[160] “...Futuristics: Looking Ahead...” ( 2005 ) By Dr. Arthur B. Shostak, Ph.D. ─ ISBN-10: 0791084019
[161] “...Moving Along: Far Ahead...” (2005) By Dr. Arthur B. Shostak ─ ISBN-10: 0791084043
[162] “...Creating Better Futures: Scenario Planning As a Tool for A Better Tomorrow...” (2002 ) By James A. Ogilvy ─ ISBN-10: 0195146115
[163] “...As the Futures Catches You: How Genomics & Other Forces Are Changing Your Life, Work, Health and Wealth...” (2005) By Juan Enriquez ─ ISBN-10: 1400047749
[164] “...Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species...” (2001) By Peter Menzel and Faith D’Aluisio ─ ISBN-10: 0262632454
[165]...”...Beyond Humanity: Cyberevolution and Future Minds...” (1996) By Gregory S. Paul and Earl Cox ─ ISBN-10: 1886801215
[166] http://bit.ly/gWka0N
[167] “...Managing Product and Service Development...” (2006) By Stefan Thomke ─ ISBN-10: 0073023019
[168] “...The Art of Asking: Ask Better Questions, Get Better Answers...” (2008) By Terry J. Fadem ─ ISBN-10: 0137144245
[169] “...Beyond Humanity: Cyberevolution and Future Minds...” (1996) By Gregory S. Paul and Earl Cox ─ ISBN-10: 1886801215
[170] “...The Future and Its Enemies: The Growing Conflict Over Creativity, Enterprise, and Progress...” (1999) By Virginia Postrel ─ ISBN-10: 0684862697
[171] “...Visions: How Science Hill Revolutionize the 21st Century...” (1998) By Dr. Michio Kaku, Ph.D. ─ ISBN-10: 0385484992
[172] http://bit.ly/dXWGm2
[173] http://bit.ly/guBaWL
[174] “...Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel...” (2009) ─ ISBN-10: 0307278824 By Dr. Michio Kaku
[175] “...The Gutenberg Galaxy: The Making of Typographic Man...” (1962) By Dr. Marshall McLuhan, Ph.D. ─ ISBN-10: 0802060412
[176] http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6B16U920101203
[177] http://bit.ly/fnOO6h
[178] Massive Change (2004) ─ ISBN-10: 0714844012 By Bruce Mau
[179] The Artilect War: Cosmists Vs. Terrans: A Bitter Controversy Concerning Whether Humanity Should Build Godlike Massively Intelligent Machines (2005) ─ ISBN-10: 0882801546 by Hugo de Garis
[180] “...Creating Tomorrow’s Schools Today: Education – Our Children – Their Futures...” (2010) ─ ISBN-10: 1855393948 by Richard Gerver
[181] http://tiny.cc/p3piz
[182] “...The Extreme Future: The Top Trends That Will Reshape the World in the Next 20 Years...” (2007) ─ ISBN-10: 0452288665 By James Canton
[183] “...The Predictioneer’s Game: Using the Logic of Brazen Self-Interest to See and Shape the Future...” (2010) ─ ISBN-10: 081297977X By Bruce Bueno de Mesquita
[184] “...Crucial Questions About the Future...” (2002) ─ ISBN-10: 0819182753 By Allen Tough
[185] http://tiny.cc/j33u9
[186] http://tiny.cc/ocn6a
[187] Synaptic Self: Our Brains Become Who We Are (2002) ─ ISBN 0-670-03028-7
[188] The Political economy of information (1988) By Vincent Mosco and Janet Wasko ─ ISBN 0-299-11570-4
[189] Management Information Systems (2009) ISBN-10: 013607846X By Ken Laudon (Author), Jane Laudon (Author)
[190] http://tiny.cc/xbob0
[191] Wilson's Ghost: Reducing The Risk Of Conflict, Killing, And Catastrophe In The 21st Century by Robert S. McNamara (2003) ─ ISBN-10: 1586481436
[192] Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach (3rd Edition) by Stuart Russell and Peter Norvig (Dec 11, 2009) ─ ISBN-10: 0136042597
[193] http://3.ly/XWtr
[194] “...The Dance of Molecules: How Nanotechnology is Changing Our Lives...” (2006) – ISBN-10: 1-56025-895-0 by Ted Sargent
[195] http://goo.gl/YFQZ6
[196] The Speed of Trust (2006) ─ ISBN-10: 0-7432-9730-X ─ By Stephen M. R. Covey
[197] Managing Innovation: Integrating Technological, Market and Organizational Change (2009) ─ISBN-10: 0470998105 ─By Joe Tidd, John Bessant
[198] http://goo.gl/LuojF
[199] http://bigthink.com/ideas/14657
[200] Source: http://goo.gl/iFpX2
[201] Hyperinnovation: Multidimensional Enterprise in the Connected Economy (2002) ─ ISBN-10: 0333994388 by Chris Harris
[202] “...Learning from the Future: Competitive Foresight Scenarios...” (1997) ─ ISBN-10: 0471303526 By Liam Fahey, Robert M. Randall
[203] “...Rethinking the Future: Rethinking Business, Principles, Competition, Control & Complexity, Leadership, Markets, and the World...” (1998) ─ ISBN-10: 9781857881080 By Rowan Gibson
[204] “...Connect the Dots... To Become An Impact Plyer...” (2003) ─ ISBN-10: 0595294928 By Dick Lynch
[205] Source: http://goo.gl/7KGG4
[206] “...The Leader Manager...” (1986) ─ ISBN-10: 0471836931 by John N. Williansom
[207] ISBN 978-0-309-11660-2
[208] http://goo.gl/dvfoQ
[209] Inscription in Washington National Archives’ building.
[210] Found via search engine query as it was earlier mentioned in REDES, the scientific television program from the Spanish state-owned television network. (As it was seen in August 2011).
[211] http://goo.gl/3GoQe
[212] Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software ─ ISBN-10: 0684868768 by Steven Johnson
[213] www.time.com/time/printout/0,8816,2048299,00.html
[214] The (Mis)behavior of Markets (2004) ─ ISBN-13 978-0-465-04355-2 By Benoit Mandelbrot
[215] The Lights in the Tunnel (2009) ─ ISBN-13: 978-1448659814 by Martin Ford
[216] Thinking for a Change: Discovering the Power to Create, Communicate and Lead (1996) by Michael Gelb ─ ISBN-10: 1854104209
[217] No Higher Honor: A Memoir of My Years in Washington ─ (2011) ─ ISBN-13: 978-0307587862 by Condoleezza Rice
ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR SUGGESTED READING:

The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology by Ray Kurzweil (http://amzn.to/co6tRs)

Lessons from the Future: Making Sense of a Blurred World from the World's Leading Futurist by Stanley M. Davis (http://amzn.to/colOCU )

It's Alive: The Coming Convergence of Information, Biology, and Business by Christopher Meyer and Stan Davis (http://amzn.to/dCMqzv)

Blur: The Speed of Change in the Connected Economy by Stan Davis and Christopher Meyer (http://amzn.to/98fuay )

Future Wealth by Stanley M. Davis and Christopher Meyer (http://amzn.to/9V9Rk9 )

The Intelligent Universe: AI, ET, and the Emerging Mind of the Cosmos by James N. Gardner and Ray Kurzweil (http://amzn.to/dv22bO)

Seeing What's Next: Using Theories of Innovation to Predict Industry Change by Clayton M. Christensen, Erik A. Roth, and Scott D. Anthony ( http://amzn.to/bLyEIo )

Our Final Hour: A Scientist's Warning by Martin J. Rees ( http://amzn.to/cRz6KE )

Technofutures: How Leading-Edge Innovations Will Transform Business in the 21st Century by James Canton (http://amzn.to/bYrN8q )

The Extreme Future: The Top Trends That Will Reshape the World in the Next 20 Years by James Canton (http://amzn.to/9RqNVm )

Futuring: The Exploration of the Future by Edward Cornish ( http://amzn.to/9sWhV1 )
Futureketing: How to Systematically Understand a World of Frantically Accelerating Pace of Change!
─ An Omnimode Exploration.

By © Copyright 2014 Andres Agostini
─ All Rights Reserved Worldwide ─

(This Proprietary Book may be reproduced for noncommercial purposes if it is copied in its entirety, including this notice. Please recall that “...if it is copied in its entirety, including this notice....”)

PRECAUTION: By any measure, the present work is an of-all-functions consideration.

Futureketing is about the rate of change. Not only change accelerated by new scientific discoveries and technological breakthroughs. Change is now poising new challenges, but also novel opportunities and benefits for those with a preparation and a will to make the most of twentieth-one century.

#1 FUTUREKETING® and the administration and application of the scientific method without innuendos and in crescendo as fluid points of inflections ascertain that the morrow is a thing of the past.

#2 FUTUREKETING®, subsequently, there is now and here available the unabridged, authoritative elicitation and elucidation of actionable knowledge from and for the incessantly arrhythmic, abrupt, antagonistic and anarchistic future, as well as the contentious interrelationship between such future and the present.

#3 FUTUREKETING®, a radical yet rigorous strong-sense and critico-creative womb-to-tomb «futures thinking», systems approach to quintessential understanding of the complexities, subtleties, and intricacies, as well as the opportunities to be exploited out of the driving forces instilling and inflicting perpetual change into twenty-first century.

#4 FUTUREKETING®, the ultimate way to understand the rate of change stemming from the so-called “...present....” What do you wish to understand the future for? You must understand the future in order to understand the most impermanent present.

You must interrelate or correlate connect the dots of every aspect that is included in this independent work.

Dr. Stephen Hawking argues that not to study more rigorously the outer space is “...foolish....” likewise, it’s beyond foolish not to comprehend the dynamic driving forces universally besieging our lives in the as-of-now present.

What is really the future? How can it be defined? All I have seen does not suffice to me. I would like the reader to amplify his or her mind by reading a creative yet accurate definition about the future! So, I have researched and assembled the world’s most breathtaking definition you can have in one locus. Ensuing now is a 7% of said researcher:

“ … The Future is 1) What is yet to come, 2) What can happen or not, 3) The future is a tranquil country, 4) The indefinite time yet to come, 5) Something that will happen in time to come, 6) A prospective or expected condition, 7) Undetermined events that will occur in that time,

Time that is to be or come hereafter, 9) Something that will exist or happen in time to come, 9) The period of time following the present moment and continuing on indefinitely, 10) The situation or condition of someone or something in the future,

11) One of a plurality of possible future conditions or situations, 12) The time or a period of time following the moment of speaking or writing; time regarded as still to come,
13) The future is what will happen in the time period after the present. Its arrival is considered inevitable due to the existence of time and the laws of physics. Due to the apparent nature of reality and the unavoidability of the future, everything that currently exists and will exist can be categorized as either permanent, meaning that it will exist for the whole of the future, or temporary, meaning that it won't and thus will come to an end. The future and the concept of eternity have been major subjects of philosophy, religion, and science, and defining them non-controversially has consistently eluded the greatest of minds. In the Occidental view, which uses a linear conception of time, the future is the portion of the projected time line that is anticipated to occur. In special relativity, the future is considered absolute future, or the future light cone.

14) The only way you can see the future is if you're ahead of your own time, 15) Learning how to be ahead of your time, today!, 16) The future is that the future is something that happens to us, not something we create,

17) Our future is determined by the actions of all of us alive today. our choices determine our destiny, 18) The future is a phenomenon that will be completely real someday even though it does not exist today,

19) Future is too important to be lost under the burden of juvenile folly and ignorant superstition, 20) Our intuition about the future is linear, which is hard-wired in our brains, 21) The future is being colonized all the time by people who have the resources, who do spend time thinking about it, planning for it and trying to shape it in their direction,

22) The future is already here; it’s just not evenly distributed, 23) the future is called ‘perhaps,’ which is the only possible thing to call the future. and the important thing is not to allow that to scare you, 24) The future is unsure. that’s the way it should be,

25) The past cannot be changed. The future is yet in your power, 26) The future is the past of to-morrow, 27) The best way to predict the future is to invent it, 28) To be masters of the future is to change the past,

29) The future is extremely important to high morale, to dynamism, to consensus, and in general to help the wheels of society turn smoothly, 30) The past is gone, the future is not to come, and the present becomes the past even while we attempt to define it, 31) The future is not for the fainthearted, 32) The future is not an echo of the past,

33) The future is not a privilege but a perpetual conquest, 34) The future is not what will happen; the future is what is happening, 35) The future is more challenging than playing catch up, 36) The future is not an extrapolation of the past, 37) The future is not something we enter. The future is something we create,

38) The future is an unknown country which requires tough visas for anyone to enter. Not all of us will get the chance to visit it, 39) The future is not what is coming at us, but what we are headed for, 40) The future is where I expect to spend the rest of my life, 41) The danger of the future is that men may become robots,

42) The future is the creation of millions of independent economic actors, 43) The future is independent of the past, 44) The future is alive. Like the present, the future is not a single, uniform state but an ongoing process that reflects the plenitude of human life, 45) The future is natural, out of anyone’s control,

46) The future is continually stalking on the present, 47) The future is technocracy in perpetuity, 48) The future is eternally clashing the present, 49) The future is absolute hard science dominance,

50) The future is going to get invented, with you or without you, 51) The future is S-H-A-Z-A-M ('...The wisdom of Solomon, the stamina of Atlas, the power of Zeus, the courage of Achilles, and the speed of Mercury....') and

52) The future is not something that happens to us, but something we create ...”
REGARDING DYNAMIC DRIVING FORCES (DDC OR CHANGE DRIVERS), LET US UNDERSTAND THE DEFINITION AND CONCEPT, THE MOST COMMON DYNAMIC DRIVING FORCES AND THE LINK BETWEEN DYNAMIC DRIVING FORCES AND STRATEGY ( http://bit.ly/1ggRYgm ).

BEGINNING OF THE RESPECTIVE QUOTATION:

“ ...Driving forces are forces outside the firm (external factors) that trigger the change of strategy in an organization. Industry conditions change because important forces (the most dominant ones that have the biggest influence on what kinds of changes will take place in the industry’s structure and competitive environment) are driving industry participants (competitors, customers, or suppliers) to alter their actions, and thus the driving forces in an industry are the major underlying causes of changing industry and competitive conditions. Driving forces analysis has two steps: identifying what the driving forces are and assessing the impact they will have on the industry ...”

And:

“... Sound analysis of an industry’s driving forces is a prerequisite to sound strategy making. Without keen awareness of what external factors will produce the biggest potential changes in the company’s business over the next one to three years, managers will ill prepare to craft (pay attention to the usage of this word—why not use MAKE) a strategy tightly matched to emerging conditions. Similarly, if managers are uncertain about the implications of each driving force or if their views are incomplete or off-base, it’s difficult for them to craft a strategy that is responsive to the driving forces and their consequences for the industry. So driving forces is not something to take lightly; it has practical strategy-making value and is basic to the task of thinking strategically about where the industry is headed and how to prepare for the changes ….Other dynamic driving forces include geologic, climatologist, political, geopolitical, demographic, social, ethical, economic, technological, financial, legal and environmental, among others ...”

END OF THE RESPECTIVE QUOTATION.

Incidentally, I want to share a quotation that was also given to me in business luncheon promoted by the Swiss Embassy. It is attributed to Dr. Henry Kissinger and it says: “...An ignored issue is an invite to a problem...”

By way of example, Winston Churchill accordingly argues, “...The goal of forecasting is not to predict the future but TO TELL YOU WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TO TAKE MEANINGFUL ACTION IN THE PRESENT...” [207]

To contrast Churchill’s motion, it is important to observe that Peter Drucker indicated that hominids are not prepared to make choices and decisions.

In accordance with Drucker, there is the great thought by Dr. Carl Sagan. He frustratedly indicated, “...We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows about science and technology...”

Greatly considering and agreeing with Drucker and Sagan, I strongly argue that there is a sort of first-order existential risk directly made by men that, both in public and private office, rampantly violate ethics, beginning with politicians.

Considering the preceding paragraph, I have a question to ask: With the advent of, for lack of a better term, a worldwide Sodom and Gomorrah (http://bit.ly/1kJkvu7), Is it possible to make the practical case for ethics and integrity? I am sorry to say: I don't think so. Ted Tuner says that humans are “...dumb...” while NASA scientists and Dr. Henry Mintzberg PhD. argue that hominids are “...unstable ...” and “...flawed...”, respectively.
Furthermore, present dynamic driving forces (science, technology, society, politics, and economy) are churning insurmountable amounts of unprecedented change with increasing energy and scope. Some people understand this notion to some extent.

I will share the definition I like about change now:

“... Change is to transfer from (one conveyance) to another and/or to undergo transformation or transition and/or to go from one phase to another and/or the act, process, or result of altering or modifying and/or the replacing of one thing for another; substitution and/or a transformation or transition from one state, condition, or phase to another and/or to make or become different and/or a variation, deviation, or modification and/or anything that is or may be substituted for something else and/or to transform and/or to transfer from one (conveyance) to another and/or to pass gradually into and/or to pass from one phase to another and/or the act of changing or the result of being changed and/or a transformation or modification and/or the substitution of one thing for another and/or the process of becoming different and/or impermanence and/or biological metamorphosis ...”

Many people believe themselves to consume news through a variety of outlets while sustaining a belief system rooted in wrong assumptions and a flawed belief system.

As a result, their cosmosvision foster superficiality and over simplification in this multi-eon era that ruthlessly demands gargantuan attention, fluidly and forever.

Some are upset and angry, without having the slightest idea of what motivates such appalling bewilderment.

Conversely, What are the Voices of the Twenty-First Century reflecting on forthcoming future, in contemporary times?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #1:

“... The ongoing changes in both the nature of work and the structure of employment foreshadow not just change but a seismic quake; a quantum shift in our very understanding of what it means to work, learn, and live .... THE AMERICAN ECONOMY —AND SOCIETY — ARE ABOUT TO EXPERIENCE A WAVE OF CHANGE THAT WILL CRASH UPON US WITH A FORCE WE HAVE NEVER KNOWN BEFORE. For higher education, this will mean dramatic changes in the requirements that graduates will be expected to meet, and in the makeup and needs of the postsecondary student population. It will also mean revolutionary innovations in the ways that colleges and universities deliver their services and how they organize themselves to develop products to meet new marketplace demands. Many who read this article will see this wave of change as frightening. But it does not have to be viewed that way .... In fact, for all the loss and risk our collective future portends, it also offers unparalleled opportunity. In a very real sense, for higher education, for America, and for humankind, the light at the end of the twentieth century is the limitless promise of the twenty-first century...” [198]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #2: (… The quickening of scientific and technological innovation under an illustriously big-picture panorama as of 2002! ...)

“...The gap between the recent past and the immediate future has never been so gaping, because the future now arrives at a rate and a magnitude like never before. By my estimate, the pace of technological innovation is accelerating arithmetically, and the number of meaningful new possibilities is expanding geometrically. Which says something about our most immediate future. Research into both pure and application-specific science, ranging from the most complex, such as genetic engineering, to the most exotic, such as nuclear fusion reactors, has reached a stage where no government or independent institute can measure it fiscally, or in terms of volume and yield. Not because of the enormous amount of capital invested, but as a consequence of its diverse and spontaneous nature, And since we cannot measure it, we do not know what will emerge .... In 1800, the state of the art was the stationary steam engine, the size of a house. It was only 90 years ago when Orville and Wilbur Wright's primitive wooden plane made its short, but mammoth, breakthrough glide. In the Middle Ages, both these contraptions would have been perceived as witchcraft. A mere 25 years ago the entire U.S. ...”

And Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #2 (continues:)

“ … Strategic early warning system was based on the Q7 mainframe computer; it took an area the size of a football pitch to house it. Today we can store 10,000 times the computational power in an area of a postage stamp. And think of this: the first draft of the infamous human genome mapping project was completed on 26 June 2000. When first planned, the entire genetic map of human biology was set to be completed around 2020. The project came in 20 years before time .... To underline all of this, the great Buckminster Fuller once estimated that about 5,000 years ago a notable invention occurred every few hundred years or so. By A.D. 0 there was one every 50 or so years. By A.D. 1000 the time has shrunk to 30 years. With the advent of the industrial revolution it was down to a significant invention every six months; and 100 years later, down to only three months. By the middle of the twentieth century the time has shortened further, and a major breakthrough occurred at the rate of one per month. ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #2 (continues:)

“ ... And today [2002], the rate of innovation is just too vast, and too fast, to measure with any meaningful accuracy .... Change quickening, and its slipstream is the first reason why we cannot predict even the most immediate future. The sheer speed and magnitude of change going on, drown out any possibility of getting a grip on what comes next, and what comes after what comes next .... The tempo of technological innovation depends also on the interconnection of ideas. In fact, this may be the root feed for the acceleration of change. As we have explored, ideas interconnect in nonlinear, acausal ways, giving up both novel and unexpected innovations. Science and technology in one field can bring about tremendous, sudden changes in other sciences or technology. What will we discover in molecular biology or synthetic chemistry, or discover in high-energy physics in the next 10 or 20 years? What will be the interconnected and enabling effects of biotechnology or nanotechnology over the next 25 or so years? Professor John Marie Lehn of the University of Strasbourg says that one area that is limitless is chemistry. It is not like physics, which behave within certain laws and is there to be discovered, chemistry is a creative process and only limited by the imagination. And when one considers the volume and speed of scientific and technological innovation going on today, the vast and increasing interconnection between minds and our ideas, it is not so unrealistic to speculate changes in the very way we live, to exceed anything we can now imagine ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #2 (continues:)

“ … The fact is, change is not only accelerating, it is also multidimensional. For every innovation, there is an unexpected string of related and unrelated events and outcomes impossible to predict until they arrive. The transistor enabled the microprocessor and software code, with this came leaps in productivity, empowering more creative work, giving more opportunities, expanding possibilities. Microcomputing brought with it new forms of communications and media, which further improved productivity, with new possibilities in leisure and entertainment, home automation and domestic appliances. None of this remarkable enterprise could have been assumed logically from the primeval conditions around the humble transistor. The nonlinearity of change sees that sooner, rather than later, events will diverge from all rational projections, and often in counterintuitive ways. So when we naturally ask what changes nanotechnology will evoke, or what artificial intelligence will bequeath, the inquiry is met with a cold retort: we cannot know in all its detail what will happen until events actually occur. As only history is frozen in time, so it is only history that is certain...” [201]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #3:

Dr. Michio Kaku, Ph.D. indicates, “... By the end of the twentieth century, science had reached the end of an era, unlocking the secrets of the atom, unraveling the molecule of life, and creating the electronic computer. With these three fundamental discoveries, triggered by the quantum revolution, the DNA revolution, and the computer revolution, the basic laws of matter, life, and computation were, in the main, finally solved .... That epic phase of science is now drawing to a close; one era is ending and another is only beginning .... The next era of science promises to be an even deeper, more thoroughgoing, more penetrating one than the last .... Clearly, we are on the threshold of yet another revolution. HUMAN KNOWLEDGE IS DOUBLING EVERY TEN YEARS [AS PER THE 1998 STANDARDS]. In the past decade, more scientific knowledge has been created than in all of human history. COMPUTER POWER IS DOUBLING EVERY EIGHTEEN MONTHS. THE INTERNET IS DOUBLING EVERY YEAR. THE NUMBER OF DNA SEQUENCES WE CAN ANALYZE IS DOUBLING EVERY TWO YEARS. Almost daily, the headlines herald new advances in computers, telecommunications, biotechnology, and space exploration. In the wake of this technological upheaval, entire industries and lifestyles are being overturned, only to give rise to entirely new ones. But these rapid, bewildering changes are not just quantitative. They mark the birth pangs of a new era ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #3 (continues:)

“ ...FROM NOW TO THE YEAR 2020, SCIENTISTS FORESEE AN EXPLOSION IN SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITY SUCH AS THE WORLD HAS NEVER SEEN BEFORE. IN TWO KEY TECHNOLOGIES, COMPUTER POWER AND THE DNA SEQUENCING, WE WILL SEE ENTIRE INDUSTRIES RISE AND FALL ON THE BASIS OF BREATHTAKING SCIENTIFIC ADVANCES. SINCE THE 1950S, THE POWER OF OUR COMPUTERS HAS ADVANCED BY A FACTOR OF ROUGHLY TEN BILLION. IN FACT, BECAUSE BOTH COMPUTER POWER AND DNA SEQUENCING DOUBLE ROUGHLY EVERY TWO YEARS, ONE CAN COMPUTE THE ROUGH TIME FRAME OVER WHICH MANY SCIENTIFIC BREAKTHROUGHS WILL TAKE PLACE .... BY 2020, MICROPROCESSORS WILL LIKELY BE AS A CHEAP AND PLENTIFUL AS SCRAP PAPER, SCATTERED BY THE MILLIONS INTO ENVIRONMENT, ALLOWING US TO PLACE INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS EVERYWHERE. THIS WILL CHANGE EVERYTHING AROUND US, INCLUDING THE NATURE OF COMMERCE, THE WEALTH OF NATIONS, AND THE WAY WE COMMUNICATE, WORK, PLAY, AND LIVE...” [171]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #4:

“...Nanotechnologies are broad concept, it’s simply refers to technology where the key features in measuring the small number of nanometers. A NANOMETER IS THE DIAMETER OF FIVE CARBON ATOMS SO IT’S VERY CLOSE TO THE MOLECULAR LEVEL AND WE ALREADY HAVE NEW MATERIALS AND DEVICES THAT HAD BEEN MANUFACTURED AT THE NANOSCALE. IN FACT, CHIPS TODAY, THE KEY FEATURES ARE 50 OR 60 NANOMETERS SO THAT IS ALREADY NANOTECHNOLOGY ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #4 (continues:)

“ ...The true promise of nanotechnology is that ultimately we’ll be able to create devices that are manufactured at the molecular level by putting together, molecular fragments in new combinations so, I can send you an information file and a desktop nanofactory will assemble molecules according to the definition in the file and create a physical objects so I can e-mail you a pair of trousers or a module to build housing or a solar panel and WE’LL BE ABLE TO CREATE JUST ABOUT ANYTHING WE NEED IN THE PHYSICAL WORLD FROM INFORMATION FILES WITH VERY INEXPENSIVE INPUT MATERIALS. You can… I mean, just a few years ago if I wanted to send you a movie or a book or a recorded album, I would send you a FedEx package, now I can e-mail you an attachment and you can create a movie or a book from that. On the future, I’ll be able to e-mail you a blouse or a meal. So, that’s the promise of nanotechnology. Another promise is to be able to create devices that are size of blood cells and by the way biology is an example of nanotechnology, the key features of biology are at the molecular level ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #4 (continues:)

“ … SO, THAT’S ACTUALLY THE EXISTENCE PROOF THAT NANOTECHNOLOGY IS FEASIBLE BUT BIOLOGY IS BASED ON LIMITED SIDE OF MATERIALS. EVERYTHING IS BUILT OUT OF PROTEINS AND THAT’S A LIMITED CLASS OF SUBSTANCES. WITH NANOTECHNOLOGY WE CAN CREATE THINGS THAT ARE FAR MORE DURABLE AND FAR MORE POWERFUL. One scientist designed a robotic red blood cell it’s a thousand times more powerful than the biological version so, if you were to replace a portion of your biological red blood cells with this respirocytes the robotic versions. You could do an Olympic sprint for 15 minutes without taking a breath or sit at the bottom of your pool for 4 hours. If I were to say someday you’ll have millions or even billions of these nanobots, nano-robots, blood cell size devices going through your body and keeping you healthy from inside, I might think well, that sounds awfully futuristic ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #4 (continues:)

“ … I’d point out this already in 50 experiments in animals of doing exactly that with the first generation of nano engineered blood cell size devices. One scientist cured type 1 diabetes in rats with the blood cell size device. Seven nanometer pores let’s insulin out in the controlled fashion. At MIT, there’s a blood cell size device that can detect and destroy cancer cells in the bloodstream. These are early experiments but KEEP IN MIND THAT BECAUSE OF THE EXPONENTIAL PROGRESSION OF THIS TECHNOLOGY, THESE TECHNOLOGIES WILL BE A BILLION TIMES MORE POWERFUL IN 25 YEARS AND YOU GET SOME IDEA WHAT WILL BE FEASIBLE ...” [199]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5:

“...We may end up in a FUTURE where employment is high, but even the unemployed serve as managers of their own cadre of ROBOT WORKERS...” [192]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (Bill Gates tells Scientific American about “...A Robot in Every Home: The leader of the PC revolution predicts that the next hot field will be robotics...” ). Ensuing:

“...Imagine being present at the birth of a new industry. It is an industry based on groundbreaking new technologies, wherein a handful of well-established corporations sell highly specialized devices for business use and a fast-growing number of start-up companies produce innovative toys, gadgets for hobbyist and other interesting niche products. But it is also a highly fragmented industry with few common standards or platforms. Projects are complex, progress is slow, and practical applications are relatively rare. In fact, for all the excitement and promise, no one can say with any certainty when ─ or even if ─ this industry will achieve critical mass. If it does, though, it may change the world ... Of course, that paragraph above could be a description of the computer industry during the mid-1970s, around the time that Paul Allen and I launched Microsoft. Back then, big, expensive mainframe computers ran the back-office operations for major companies, governmental departments and other institutions ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … Researchers at leading universities and industrial laboratories were creating the basic building blocks that would make the information age possible. Intel has just introduced the 8080 microprocessor, and Atari was selling the popular electronic game Pong. At home ground computer clubs, enthusiast to figure out exactly what this new technology was good for ... But what I really have in mind is something much more contemporary: the emergence of the robotic industry, which is developing in much the same way the computer business did 30 years ago. Think of the manufacturing robots currently used on automobile assembly lines as the equivalent of yesterday’s mainframes. The industry’s niche products include robotic arms that perform surgery, surveillance robots deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan that dispose of roadside bombs, and domestic robots vacuum the floor. Electronic companies have made robotic toys that can imitate people or dogs or dinosaurs, and hobbyists are anxious to get their hands on the latest version of the Lego robotic system ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ ...Meanwhile some of the world’s best minds are trying to solve the toughest problems of robotics, such as visual recognition, navigation and machine learning. And they are succeeding. At the 2004 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Grand Challenge, a completion to produce the first robotic vehicle capable of navigating autonomously over a rugged 142-mile course though the Mojave Desert, the top competitor managed to travel just 7.4 miles before breaking down. In 2005, though, five vehicles covered the complete distance, and the race’s winner did it at an average speed of 19.1 miles an hour. (In another intriguing parallel between the robotics and computer industries, DARPA also funded the work that led to the creation of Arpanet, the precursor to the Internet) ... What is more, the challenges facing the robotic industry are similar to those we tackled in computing three decades ago. Robotic companies have no standard operating software that could allow popular application programs to run in a variety of devices. The standardization of robotic processors and other hardware is limited, and very little of the programming code used in one machine can be applied to another. Whenever somebody wants to build a new robot, they usually have to start from square one ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … Despite these difficulties, when I talk to people involved in robotics ─ from university researchers to entrepreneurs, hobbyists and high school students ─ the level of excitement and expectation reminds me so much of that time when Paul Allen and I looked at the convergence of new technologies and dreamed of the day when a computer would be on every desk and in every home. And as I look at the trends that are now starting to converge, I can envision a future in which robotic devices will become a nearly ubiquitous part of our day-to-day lives. I believe that technologies such as distributed computing voice and visual recognition, and wireless broadband connectivity will open the door to a new generation of autonomous devices that enable computers to perform tasks in the physical world on our behalf. We may be on the verge of a new era, when the PC will get up off the desktop and allow us to see, hear, touch and manipulate objects in places where we are not physically present ... The word ‘ROBOT’ was popularized in 1921 by Czech playwright Karel Capek, but people have envisioned creating robotlike devices for thousands of years. In Greek and Roman mythology, the gods of metalwork built mechanical servants made from gold. In the first century A.D., Heron of Alexandria ─ the great engineer credited with inventing the first steam engine ─ designed intriguing automatons, including one said to have the ability to talk. Leonardo da Vinci’s 1495 sketch of a mechanical knight, which could sit up and move its arms and legs, is considered to be the first plan for a humanoid robot ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … Over the past century, anthropomorphic machines have become familiar figures in popular culture through books such as Isaac Asimov’s I, Robot, movies such as Star Wars and television shows such as Star Trek. The popularity of robots in fiction indicates that people are receptive to the idea that these machines will one day way among us as helpers and even as companions. Nevertheless, although robots play a vital role in industries such as automobile manufacturing ─ where there is about one robot for every 10 workers ─ the fact is that we have a long way to go before real robots catch up with their science-fiction counterparts ... One reason for this gap is that it has been much harder than expected to enable computers and robots to sense their surrounding environment and to react quickly and accurately. It has provoked difficult to give robots the capabilities that humans take for granted ─ for example, the abilities to orient themselves with respect to the objects in room, to respond to sounds and interpret speech, and to grasp objects of varying size, textures and fragility. Even something as simple as telling the difference between an open door and a window can be devilishly tricky for a robot ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … But researchers are starting to find the answers. One trend that has helped them is the increasing availability of tremendous amounts of computer power. One megahertz of processing power, which cost more than $7,000 in 1970, can now be purchased for just pennies. The access to cheap power has permitted scientists to work on many of the hard problems that are fundamental to making robots practical. Today, for example, voice-recognition programs can identify words quite well, but a far greater challenge will be building machines that can understand what those words mean in context. As computing capacity continues to expand, robot designers will have the processing power they need to tackle issues of ever greater complexity ... Another barrier to the development of robots has been the high cost of hardware, such as sensors that enable a robot to determine to an object as well as motors and servos that allow the robot to manipulate an object with both strength and delicacy. But prices are dropping fast. Laser range finders that are used in robotics to measure distance with precision cost about $10,000 a few years ago; today they can be purchased for about $2,000. And new, more accurate sensors based on ultrawideband radar are available for even less ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … Now robot builders can also add Global Positioning System chips, video cameras, array microphones (which are better than conventional microphones at distinguishing a voice from a background noise) and a host of additional sensors for a reasonable expense. The resulting enhancement of capabilities, combined with expanded processing power and storage, allows today’s robots to do things such as vacuum a robot or help to defuse a roadside bomb ─ tasks that would have been impossible for commercially produced machines just a few years ago ... In February 2004 I visited a number of leading universities, including Carnegie Mellon University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, Cornell University and the University of Illinois, to talk about the powerful role that computers can play in solving some of society’s most pressing problems. My goal was to help students understand how exciting and important computer science can be, and I hoped to encourage a few of them to think about careers in technology ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ ... At each university, after delivering my speech, I had the opportunity to get a firsthand look at some of the most interesting research projects in the school’s computer science department. Almost without exception, I was shown at least one project that involved robotics ... At that time, my colleagues at Microsoft were also hearing people in academia and at commercial robotics firms who wondered if our company was doing any work in robotics that might help them with their own development efforts. We were not, so we decided to take a closer look. I asked Tandy Trower, a member of my strategic staff and a 25-year Microsoft veteran, to go on an extended fact-finding mission and to speak with people across the robotics community. What he found was universal enthusiasm for the potential of robotics, along with an industry-wide desire for tools that would make development easier. ‘Many see the robotics industry at a technological turning point where a move to PC architecture makes more and more sense,’ Tandy wrote in his report to me after his fact-finding mission. ‘As Red Whitaker, leader of [Carnegie Mellon’s] entry in the DARPA Grand Challenge, recently indicated, the hardware capability is mostly there; now the issue is getting the software right.’ ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … Back in the early days of the personal computers, we realized that we needed an ingredient that would allow all of the pioneering work to achieve critical mass, to coalesce into a real industry capable of producing truly useful products on a commercial scale. What was needed, it turned out, was Microsoft BASIC. When we created this programming language in the 1970s, we provided the common foundation that enabled programs developed for one set of hardware to run on another. BASIC also made computer programming much easier, which brought more and more people into the industry. Although a great many individuals made essential contributions to the development of the personal computer, Microsoft BASIC was one of the key catalysts for the software and hardware innovations that made the PC revolution possible ... After reading Tandy’s report, it seemed clear to me that before the robotics industry could make the same kind of quantum leap that the PC industry made 30 years ago, it, too, need to find that missing ingredient. ...”

“ … So I asked him to assemble a small team that would work with people in the robotics field to create a set of programming tools that would provide the essential plumbing so that anybody interested in robots with even the most basic understanding of computer programming could easily write robotic applications that would work with different kinds of hardware. The goal was to see if it was possible to provide the same kind of common, low-level foundation for integrating hardware and software into robot designs that Microsoft BASIC provided for computer programmers ... Tandy’s robotics group has been able to drawn a number of advanced technologies developed by a team working under the direction of Craig Mundie, Microsoft’s chief research and strategy officer. One such technology will help solve one of the most difficult problems facing robot designers: how to simultaneously handle all the data coming in from multiple sensors and send the appropriate commands to the robot’s motors, a challenge known as concurrency ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … A conventional approach is to write a traditional, single-threaded program ─ a long loop that first reads all the data from the sensors, then processes this input and finally delivers output that determines the robot’s behavior, before starting the loop all over again. The shortcomings are obvious: if your robot has fresh sensor data indicating that the machine is at the edge of a precipice, but the program is still at the bottom of the loop calculating trajectory and telling the wheels to turn faster based on previous sensor input, there is a good chance the robot will fall down the stairs before it can process the new information ... Concurrency is a challenge that extends beyond robotics. Today as more and more applications are written for distributed networks of computers, programmers have struggled to figure out how to efficiently orchestrate code running on many servers at the same time. And as computers with a single processor are replaced by machines with multiple processors and ‘multicore’ processors ─ integrated circuits with two or more processors joined together for enhanced performance ─ software designers will need a new way to program desktop applications and operating systems. To fully exploit the power of processors working in parallel, the new software must deal with the problem of concurrency ... One approach to handling concurrency is to write multi-threaded programs that allow data to travel along many paths ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … But as any developer who has written multithreaded code can tell you, this is one of the hardest tasks in programming. The answer that Craig’s team has devised to the concurrency problem is something called the concurrency and coordination runtime (CCR). The CCR is a library of functions ─ that makes it easy to write multithreaded applications that can coordinate a number of simultaneous activities. Designed to help programmers take advantage of the power of multicore and multiprocessor systems, the CCR turns out to be ideal for robotics as well. By drawing on this library to write their programs, robot designers can dramatically reduce the chances that one of their creations will run into a wall because its software is too busy sending output to its wheels to read input from its sensors ... In addition to tackling the problem of concurrency, the work that Craig’s team has done will also simplify the writing of distributed robotic applications through a technology called decentralized software services (DSS) ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … DSS enables developers to create applications in which the services ─ the parts of the program that read a sensor, say, or control a motor ─ operate as separate processes that can be orchestrated in much the same way that text, images and information from several servers are aggregated on a Web page. Because DSS allow software components to run in isolation from one another, if an individual component of a robot fails, it can be shut down and restarted ─ or even replaced ─ without having to reboot the machine. Combine with broadband wireless technology, this architecture makes it easy to monitor and adjust a robot form a remote location using a Web browser ... What is more, a DSS application controlling a robotic device does not have to reside entirely on the robot itself bun can be distributed across more than one computer. As a result, the robot can be a relatively inexpensive device that delegates complex processing tasks to the high-performance hardware found on today’s home PCs. I believe this advance will pave the way for an entirely new class of robots that are essentially mobile, wireless peripheral devices that tap into the power of Mobile, wireless peripheral devices that tap into the power of desktop PCs to handle processing-intensive tasks such as visual recognition and navigation ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … And because these devices can be networked together, we can expect to see the emergence of groups of robots that can work in concert to achieve goals such as mapping the seafloor or planting crops ... These technologies are a key part of Microsoft Robotics Studio, a new software development kit built by Tandy’s team. Microsoft Robotics Studio also includes tools that make it easier to create robotic applications using a wide range of programming language. One example is a simulation tool that lets robots builders test their applications in a three-dimensional virtual environment before trying them out in the real world. Our goal for this release is to create an affordable, open platform that allows robot developers to readily integrate hardware and software into their designs ... How soon will robots become part of our day-to-day lives? According to the International Federation of Robotics, about two million personal robots were in use around the world in 2004, and another seven million will be installed by 2008. In South Korea the Ministry of Information and Communication hopes to put a robot in every home there by 2013 ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … The Japanese Robot Association predicts that by 2025, the personal robot industry will be worth more than $50 billion a year worldwide, compared with about $5 billion today ... As with the PC industry in the 1970s, it is impossible to predict exactly what applications will drive this new industry. It seems quite likely, however, that robots will play an important role in providing physical assistance and even companionship for the elderly. Robotic devices will probably help people with disabilities get around and extend the strengths and endurance of soldiers, construction workers and medical professionals. Robots will maintain dangerous industrial machines, handle hazardous materials and monitor remote oil pipelines. They will enable health care workers to diagnose and treat patients who may be thousands of miles away, and they will be a central feature of security systems and search-and-rescue operations ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #5 (continues:)

“ … Although a few of the robots of tomorrow may resemble the anthropomorphic devices seen in Stars Wars, most likely look nothing like the humanoid C-3PO. In fact, as mobile peripheral devices become more and more common, it may be increasingly difficult to say exactly what a robot is. Because the new machines will be so specialized and ubiquitous ─ and look so little like the two-legged automatons of science fiction ─ we so little like the two-legged automatons of science-fiction ─ we probably will not even call them robots. But as these devices become affordable to consumers, they could have just as profound an impact on the way we work, communicate, learn and entertain ourselves as the PC has had over the past 30 years ...” [211]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #6:

“...Because of the explosive nature of exponential growth, the twenty-first century will be equivalent to twenty thousand years of progress at today’s rate of progress; about one thousand times greater than the 20th century...” (The Singularity Is Near).

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #7:

President John F. Kennedy’s speech ─ on September 12, 1962 at Rice University ─ indicated: “...Despite the striking fact that most of the scientists that the world has ever known are alive and working today, despite the fact that this Nation’s own SCIENTIFIC MANPOWER IS DOUBLING EVERY 12 YEARS IN A RATE OF GROWTH MORE THAN THREE TIMES THAT OF OUR POPULATION AS A WHOLE, DESPITE THAT, THE VAST STRETCHES OF THE UNKNOWN AND THE UNANSWERED AND THE UNFINISHED STILL FAR OUTSTRIP OUR COLLECTIVE COMPREHENSION...” [80]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #8:

Max Planck (1858 – 1947) pointed out: “...A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die, and a new generation grows up that is familiar...” [187]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #9:

To further set the stage for this material, the textbook “...Einstein in the Boardroom...” by Suzanne S. Harrison and Patrick H. Sullivan Sr. may offer some lucid ideas on the “...current...” state of affairs when they claim:

“...Humans have been adding to their total knowledge steadily over the centuries, and the amount of knowledge we create is multiplying at an incredible rate. BEGINNING WITH THE AMOUNT OF KNOWLEDGE IN THE KNOWN WORLD AT THE TIME OF CHRIST, STUDIES HAVE ESTIMATED THAT THE FIRST DOUBLING OF THAT KNOWLEDGE TOOK PLACE ABOUT 1700 A.D. THE SECOND DOUBLING OCCURRED AROUND THE YEAR 1900. IT IS ESTIMATED TODAY THAT THE WORLD'S KNOWLEDGE BASE WILL DOUBLE AGAIN BY 2010 AND AGAIN AFTER THAT BY 2013...” [37]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #10:

H.G. Wells (Herbert George Wells ─ 21 September 1866 ─ 1946) observes: “... An immense and ever-increasing wealth of knowledge is scattered about the world today; knowledge that would probably suffice to solve all the mighty difficulties of our age but it is dispersed and unorganized. We need a sort of mental clearinghouse for the mind: a depot where knowledge and ideas are received, sorted, summarized, clarified and compared ...” [188]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #11:

There are many serious publications, from 2003 to this date, speaking of the entirety of scientific knowledge doubling every five (5) years and sooner. How, then, can one undertake such a gargantuan challenge, through the “...Society of Knowledge...” (that also embraces the “...infotech economy...”), unless it is through the stewardship of the most rigorous and advanced scientific method? [129]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #12:

Human knowledge capability will continue to double every year. “...Human knowledge capability...” is the quantity of available knowledge multiplied by the power of technology to process that knowledge. This capability will increase by two to the power of 100, the equivalent of a thousand billion billion, in the twenty-first century...” — James Martin, “...The 17 Great Challenges of the Twenty-First Century,...” Jan-Feb 2007, p. 24 [The Futurist Magazine’s Top-10 Forecast for 2010]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #13:

Ray Kurzweil sustains: “...[THERE IS A] DOUBLING EVERY TWO YEARS [REGARDING THE TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT OF] SOLAR ENERGY BY APPLYING NANOTECHNOLOGY TO SOLAR PANELS...” [177]. Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #14:

Is genetics and genomic making landmark progression to solve complicated challenges?

Ray Kurzweil comments: “...NANO-GENETIC SEQUENCING DATA … IS DOUBLING EVERY YEAR...” [177]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #15:

What has become of novel knowledge content manufacturing as of now?

Ray Kurzweil posits: “...KNOWLEDGE IS DOUBLING BY EVERY FOURTEEN MONTHS...” [177]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #16:

Is Moore's Law beginning to run out of steam? Does it represent the death of computer power?

Ray Kurzweil expresses: “...MORE THAN THE DOUBLING OF COMPUTATIONAL POWER [IS TAKING PLACE] EVERY YEAR...” [177]. Brackets are mine.

The more the advancement, the less the jobs for biologicals?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #17:

“...Alvin Toffler wrote in Future Shock (1970), “…The work has been cut by 50 percent since the turn of the century. It is not out of the way to predict that it will be slashed in half again by 2000 ..” [192]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #18:

China mulls $1.5 trillion strategic industries boost? How far can China go to pervasively cutting-edge science and technology while the West, seemingly and allegedly, does not get its act together? What does a prominent news agency have to report on it?

Reuters (Dec 03, 2010) noticed: “...China is considering investments of up to $1.5 trillion over five years in seven strategic industries, sources said, a plan aimed at accelerating the country's transition from the world's supplier of cheap goods to a leading purveyor of high-value technologies .... Analysts expressed skepticism at the sheer amount of money ─ it equates to about 5 percent of China's gross domestic product on an annual basis ─ but said that the eye-popping headline figure was an indication of the government's determination to catalyze a structural shift in the economy .... THE TARGETED SECTORS INCLUDE ALTERNATIVE ENERGY, BIOTECHNOLOGY, NEW-GENERATION INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, HIGH-END EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING, ADVANCED MATERIALS, ALTERNATIVE-FUEL CARS AND ENERGY-SAVING AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY TECHNOLOGIES ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #18 (continues:)

“ … Beijing has said before that it wants to promote the sectors, a policy that it hopes will make the country less dependent on low-end, dirty manufacturing. The value-added output of the seven strategic industries together account for about 2 percent of GDP now. The government has said it wants them to generate 8 percent of GDP in 2015 and 15 percent by 2020...” [176]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #19:

How does Futureketing argue about the linkage between our thoughts, the Multiverse and the forthcoming advent of the Technological Singularity?

“...Bart Simpson: ‘Dad, What is the mind? Is it just a system of impulses or something tangible? [Thinking better my question, Dad, Is the mind a projection of Computronium instilled into our brain? If so, Will my mind be superseded above and beyond by the Strong Artificial Intelligence devices embedded in the transbiologicals’ and robots’ own quantum CPUs?]’...” [187]

Transbiologicals are biologicals who have transcended their own biology.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #20:

Zillion impossible science facts turned into rampant realities today?

Dr. Michio Kaku, Ph.D. points out, “...As a physicist, I have learned that the ‘impossible’ is often a relative term .... IN MY OWN SHORT LIFETIME I HAVE SEEN THE SEEMINGLY IMPOSSIBLE BECOME ESTABLISHED SCIENTIFIC FACT OVER AND OVER AGAIN. So is it impossible to think we might one day be able to teleport ourselves from one place to another, or build a spaceship that will one day take us light-years to the stars? .... If we were to somehow encounter a civilization a million years more advanced than ours, would their everyday technology appear to be ‘magic’ to us? .... Just because something is ‘impossible’ today, will it remain impossible centuries or millions of years into the future? ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #20 (continues:)

“ … Given the remarkable advances in science in the past century, especially the creation of the quantum theory and general relativity, it is now possible to give rough estimates of when, if ever, some of these fantastic technologies may be realized. With the coming of even more advanced theories, such as string theory, even concepts bordering on science fiction, such as time travel and parallel universes, are now becoming re-evaluated by physicists. Think back 150 years to those technological advances that were declared ‘impossible’ by scientists at the time and that have now become part of our everyday lives. Jules Verne wrote a novel in 1863, Paris in the Twentieth Century, which was locked away and forgotten for over a century until it was accidentally discovered by his great-grandson and published for the first time in 1994. In it Verne predicted what Paris might look like in the year 1960. His novel was filled with technology that was clearly considered impossible in the nineteenth century, including fax machines, a world-wide communications network, glass skyscrapers, gas-powered automobiles, and high-speed elevated trains … Not surprisingly, Verne could make such stunningly accurate predictions because he was immersed in the world of science, picking the brains of scientists around him. A deep appreciation for the fundamentals of science allowed him to make such startling predictions ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #20 (continues:)

“ … IRONICALLY, THE SERIOUS STUDY OF THE IMPOSSIBLE HAS FREQUENTLY OPENED UP RICH AND ENTIRELY UNEXPECTED DOMAINS OF SCIENCE. For example, over the centuries the frustrating and futile search for a ‘perpetual motion machine’ led physicists to conclude that such a machine was impossible, forcing them to postulate the conservation of energy and the three laws of thermodynamics. Thus the futile search to build perpetual motion machines helped to open up the entirely new field of thermodynamics, which in part laid the foundation of the steam engine, the machine age, and modern industrial society .... We ignore the impossible at our peril. In the 1920s and 1930s Robert Goddard, the founder of modern rocketry, was the subject of intense criticism by those who thought that rockets could never travel in outer space. They sarcastically called his pursuit Goddard’s Folly. In 1921 the editors of the New York Times railed against Dr. Goddard’s work: ‘…Professor Goddard does not know the relation between action and reaction and the need to have something better than a vacuum against which to react. He seems to lack the basic knowledge ladled out daily in high schools...’ Rockets were impossible; the editors huffed, because there was no air to push against in outer space ...”

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“ … Sadly, one head of state did understand the implications of Goddard’s ‘impossible’ rockets ─ Adolph Hitler. During World War II, Germany’s barrage of impossibly advanced V-2 rockets rained death and destruction on London, almost bringing it to its knees .... Time and again we see that the study of the impossible has opened up entirely new vistas, pushing the boundaries of physics and chemistry and forcing scientists to redefine what they mean by ‘impossible.’ As Sir William Osler once said, ‘THE PHILOSOPHIES OF ONE AGE HAVE BECOME THE ABSURDITIES OF THE NEXT, AND THE FOOLISHNESS OF YESTERDAY HAS BECOME THE WISDOM OF TOMORROW.’ .... Many physicists subscribe to the famous dictum of T. H. White, who wrote in The Once and Future King, ‘Anything that is not forbidden is mandatory!’ In physics we find evidence of this all the time .... For example, cosmologist Stephen Hawking tried to prove that time travel was impossible by finding a new law of physics that would forbid it, which he called the ‘chronology protection conjecture.’ Unfortunately, after many years of hard work he was unable to prove this principle. In fact, to the contrary, physicists have now demonstrated that a law that prevents time travel is beyond our present-day mathematics ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #20 (continues:)

“ ...Today, because there is no law of physics preventing the existence of time machines, physicists have had to take their possibility very seriously .... Already one ‘impossible’ technology is now proving to be possible: the notion of teleportation (at least at the level of atoms). Even a few years ago physicists would have said that sending or beaming an object from one point to another violated the laws of quantum physics. The writers of the original Star Trek television series, in fact, were so stung by the criticism from physicists that they added ‘Heisenberg compensators’ to explain teleporters in order to address this flaw. Today, because of a recent breakthrough, physicists can teleport atoms across a room or photons under the Danube River...” [174] To read more on this citation, go to Amazon at http://amzn.to/dHGkOW

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #21:

Fruitfully planting towards which tense?

“...The heritage of the past is the seed that brings forth the harvest of the future...” ─ Inscription from statuary pedestal at National Archives in Washington

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #22:

Many forces are not predictable but some others are predictable based on applied omniscience, marshaled articulated on systems approach!

Yogi Berra remarks: “...Prediction is very hard, especially when it's about the future...” [171]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #23:

In dealing with hard science, incidentally, is not right that less is more in the following lapidary axiom by Albert Einstein!

"…The grand aim of all science is to cover the greatest number of empirical facts by logical deduction from the smallest number of hypotheses or axioms..." [208]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #24:

Who creates the future and who doesn’t?

Michael Anissimov utters: “...One of the biggest flaws in the common conception of the future is that the future is something that happens to us, not something we create...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #25:

What are the ruthless drivers?

Harold Varmus, NIH Director, remarks: “...There are three great themes in science in the twentieth century ─ the atom, the computer, and the gene...” [171]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #26:

Interacting with the future?

Rainer Maria Rilke concluded: “...The future enters into us in order to transform itself in us long before it happens...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #27:

What to consider about gauging the future?

Wired (1994) pointed: “...The future belongs to neither the conduit or content players, but those who control the filtering, searching and sense-making tools we will rely on to navigate through the expansion of cyberspace...” [145]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #28:

Horses, dogs and robotic dominance of all?

Samuel Butler (1863 letter) indicates: “...Who will be man’s successor? To which the answer is: We are ourselves creating our own successors. Man will become to the machine what the horse and the dog are to man; the conclusion being that machines are, or are becoming, animate...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #29:

Brainy ones hyper-accelerating industries and beyond?

Juan Enriquez verbalizes: “... Meanwhile, lone individuals are birthing not just companies but entire industries that rapidly become bigger than the economies of most countries. But unlike growth industries of the past … cars and aerospace, for example … the industries that will dominate our future depend on just a few smart minds … Not a lot of manpower … So during a period of prosperity and economic growth … Wealth is ever more mobile and concentrated...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #30:

What is the current rate of change? What is the as-of-now rate of technological and scientific knowledge doubling?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #31:

Mark Miller, computer scientist, explains: “...You know, things are going to be really different … No, no, I mean really different...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #32:

What are we morphing into?

Sir Arthur C. Clarke observed: “...It’s also a tour de force of photography: the images reveal a whole new order of creation about to come into existence. No one who has any interest in the future can afford it...” [164]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #33:

The outcomes stemming of the intermixing of the exuberant technologies?

Juan Enriquez posits: “...You and your children are about to face a series of unprecedented moral, ethical, economic, and financial issues. The choices you make [as well as those you’re failing to make because of lack of detailed, advanced and deep awareness] will impact where you live, what you earn, what your grandchildren will look like, how long you live. It all starts because we are mixing apples, oranges, and floppy disks...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #34:

“...The future belongs to neither the conduit or content players, but those who control the filtering, searching and sense-making tools we will rely on to navigate through the expanses of cyberspace ...” [198]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #35:

From perennially upgraded knowledge into decisive, ruling empires?

Juan Enriquez claims: “...The knowledge revolution is taking place in small, sharply defined areas. One company generates more U.S. patents than 139 countries do together … This [revolution] generates new EMPIRES and new ghettos .... It slams into existing systems and destroys them while creating new systems. Countries and individuals can either surf new and powerful waves of change ─ or try to stop them and get crushed...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #36:

Shocking times equate to shocking futures?

Jose Ortega y Gasset stated: “...Life is a series of collisions with the future; it is not the sum of what we have been, but what we yearn to be...” [149]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #37:

Why everything changes, beginning with change itself?

Nicola Tesla, 1896, Inventor of Alternative Current, reasoned: “...I do not think there is any thrill that can go through the human heart like that felt by the inventor as he sees some creation of the brain unfolding to success...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #38:

Which one is the future of computing and science while the so-called present is undergoing mazes at the rhythm of increasing hypes?

Ray Kurzweil points: “...[IN THE NEAR FUTURE] COMPUTERS [WILL BE] DOING HARD SCIENCE...” [177] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #39:

Is the new paradigm changing to so many paradigms simultaneously resulting impossibles to figure out any paradigm correctly?

Juan Enriquez utters: “...Many people, even some of the heads of megacorporations, feel that the world is moving too fast as companies, even industries, disappear...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #40:

What are the brain’s priorities beyond seizing life-support capabilities for its own sustainability?

Michael Polanyi concludes: “...The mind is attracted by beautiful [and advanced] problems, promising beautiful [and useful solutions]...” [160]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #41:

Was the creation of the world explosive? How expansive does an on-going explosion become?

“... The world is seeing a Cambrian explosion of media usage ...” [198]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #42:

What has become of fate and destiny in times that neuroscience researchers are coming out with some PRELIMINARY outcomes that seem to suggest: “...The present is a function of the future...”?

Robert Theobald reasons: “...Our future is determined by the actions of all of us alive today. Our choices determine our destiny...” [160] Commentary: Some researchers in speaking of some very preliminary yet indicative findings ask: «...Is the present a function of the future?...»

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #43:

Which destiny is that?

William Jennings Bryan observes: “...Destiny is not a matter of chance ─ it is a matter of choice. It is not a thing to be waited for ─ it is a thing to be achieved...” [174]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #44:

What are the cosmological traits of this over-fragmented “...society...”? Certainly!

David Brin commented: “...What distinguishes society today is not only the pace of events, but also the nature of the tool kit for facing the future...” [160]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #45:

What are the origins of the future?

“...Do not presume that past success indicates future impregnability...” [154]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #46:

While at digital-driven world, Could one refer to Paradise as Computronium?

“...We all go from anticipation to anticipation. In cyberspace there always is room over the next ridge to build a new perspective of heaven ...” [198]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #47:

There is here a point of view about change (as change is partly explored here):

Adam Gordon established: “...We have seen eye-popping developments across society, technology, institutions, and products and services in the last generation; this will surely continue into the future .... if we decide today to launch a product, buy a house, study for a degree, build a new light rail system, or take any similar decision of significance, the environment of tomorrow will be a key factor in the success or failure of that decision .... Our decisions are only as good as the view of the future they rest on [profound understanding of all of the driving forces shaping and re-shaping the environment]. All opportunities and successes and profits are realized in the future. All threats, failures, and losses are realized in the future .... Either way, the earlier and clearer we see future circumstances, the better we will be able to benefit by changing our current recipes for success to keep up with the changes in the world. The better managers’ view of the future, the better their decisions will turn out to be ...” [102]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #48:

How does change and future interrelate?

Alvin Toffler asserts: “...Change is the process by which the future invades our lives...” [147]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #49:

Does the pursuit of progress beget ubiquitous robots?

“...We are hanging ears, ears and sensory organs on our computers and on our networks asking them to observe the physical world on our behalf and to manipulate it. The more you connect computers to the physical world, the more the issue of interaction becomes important ...” [198]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #50:

What can we do about the future if we have failed to do the proper and sensible things with the past and present?

“... That it is possible for us to anticipate actions, to predict the future, and, by looking for ways to change incentives, to engineer the future across a stunning range of considerations .... One of particular import is that the future ─ or at least its anticipation ─ can cause the past, perhaps even more often than the past causes the future .... must we change our base thinking to work out any variety of predictions and, especially, to change the future?...” [183]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #51:

How do we calculate the future?

“...In summary, the future is a phenomenon that will be completely real someday even though it does not exist today .... Even if the future is approximately equal to today, it will also differ dramatically from today in many particular ways...” [184]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #52:

We have gone ubiquitously digital and genetic and the consequences are unpronounceable even in orders of magnitude?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #53:

Juan Enriquez indicates: “...Digital code is what drives rapid speed growth today. It allows mergers like AOL Time Warner … It drives the Internet, TV, music, finance, IT, news coverage, research, manufacturing. A few countries and companies understood the change. That is how poor countries like Finland, Singapore, and Taiwan got so wealthy … So quickly … But a lot of folks just did not learn to read and write a new language … And even though they produced more and more goods, particularly commodities … And even though they restructured companies and governments … Cut budgets, raised taxes, built large factories and buildings … They got a lot poorer. (In 1938 the richest country per person in Asia was … the Philippines. In 1954, according to the World Bank, the most promising Asian economy was … Burma. Both remain commodity economies … Both are sidelined from the digital revolution … And you probably would not like to live in either country). Your world changed when you went ‘On Line.’ One day you used a fax or e-mail … And it soon became hard to conceive of living with only snail mail. If you understood this change early …”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #53 (continues:)

“ ... And invested or worked in some of the companies driving the digital revolution … You are probably quite well off … (as a country and/or as an individual). If you came late, as a speculator, without understanding what a digital language does, or does not do … You probably lost a lot of money during the year 2000. Your world … and your language … are about to change again. The two nucleotide base pairs that code all life …A-T, C-G … Have already led some of the world’s largest companies … Monsanto … DuPont … Novartis … IBM … Hoechst … Compaq … GlaxoSmithKline … To declare that their future lies in life science. They have abandoned, sold, spun off core business divisions … And launched themselves into selling completely new products … Which is why so many chemical, seed, cosmetic, food, pharmaceutical companies … Are partnering, Merging, Growing. Some life-science companies will crash spectacularly … Others will get larger than Microsoft and Cisco … (Companies that are already larger than the economies of most of the world’s countries.). The world’s mega-mergers are going to be driven by digital and genetic code. Consider what is about to happen to medicine. You currently spend about nine times as much for doctors and medical interventions...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #53 (continues:)

“... As you do on medicines and prevention. In the measure that we understand how viruses, bacteria, and our bodies are programmed … And how they can be reprogrammed … Treatment will shift from emergency interventions … Toward deliberate and personalized prevention … (Just as dentistry did.). And we may end up spending just as much on pharmaceuticals as we do on doctors. These medicines do not have to be pills or injections … They could be a part of the food you eat every day, your soap or cosmetics … Perhaps you will inhale them or simply put various patches on your skin. (This is why Procter & Gamble is thinking of merging with a pharmaceutical company, why L’Oreal is hiring molecular biologists, and why Campbell’s is selling soups designed for hospital patients with specific diseases.)...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #54:

Connect everything to everything else to further improve and expand an even more pervasive automation? Is automation also a term for increasing replacement of labor by humans?

“...When they really touch our lives, information systems cease to be information systems. They are media...” [198]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #55:

Dr. Marshall McLuhan, Ph.D. (1962) asserts: “...Our world tomorrow will be utterly different, in ways we cannot even conceive...” [175]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #56:

What hijacks what?

Dr. Stephen Covey writes: “...Again, yesterday holds tomorrow hostage .... Memory is past. It is finite. Vision is future. It is infinite. Vision is greater than history...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #57:

The consequences of a world going from round to flat?

Thomas Friedman claims: “...The flattening of the world is going to be hugely disruptive to both traditional and developed societies. The weak will fall further behind faster. The traditional will feel the force of modernization much more profoundly. The new will get turned into old quicker. The developed will be challenged by the underdeveloped much more profoundly. I worry, because so much political stability is built on economic stability, and economic stability is not going to be a feature of the flat world. Add it all up and you can see that the disruptions and going to come faster and harder. No one is immune ─ not me, not you, not Microsoft. WE ARE ENTERING AN ERA OF CREATIVE DESTRUCTION ON STEROIDS. Dealing with flatism is going to be a challenge of a whole new dimension even if your country has a strategy. But if you don’t have a strategy at all, well, again, you’ve warned...” [139]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #58:

Perpetually change or die?

Michael Gelb (1996) argues: “...Thirty-five years ago, psychologist and visionary Dr. Abraham Maslow warned, ‘life is moving far more rapidly now than ever before in the rate of growth of facts, knowledge, techniques, and inventions. We need a different kind of human being able to life in a world that changes perpetually, who has been educated to be comfortable with change and situations in which he has absolutely no forewarning. The society that can turn out those people will survive. Societies which do not will die.’...” [216]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #59:

Why this changed change is unprecedented and different? San Francisco futurist James Canton offers insight.

“...CIO Insight: In The Extreme Future, you say the 21st century is going to be lightning-fast, complex and driven by disruptive changes. But aren't we already in this extreme future? [RESPONDING THE QUESTION,] JAMES CANTON [INDICATES]: WE ARE TO A CERTAIN EXTENT. BUT THE POINT OF MY BOOK IS THAT THINGS ARE GOING TO GET EVEN MORE DISRUPTIVE, COMPLEX AND COMPETITIVE; THINGS ARE NOT GOING TO EASE OFF, THEY'RE ACTUALLY GOING TO ACCELERATE...” [138] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #60:

What are the organic properties of change and its impact?

David Schlesinger, global managing director at Reuters, indicates: “...Change is hard. Change is hardest on those caught by surprise. Change is hardest on those who have difficulty changing too. But change is natural; change is not new; change is important...” [139]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #61:

The universe and the morrow?

Isaac Asimov verbalizes: “...Humanity has the stars in its future, and that future is too important to be lost under the burden of juvenile folly and ignorant superstition...” [141]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #62:

Understanding the universe as we don’t think it is and as many people cannot align it with their belief system?

Dr. Carl Sagan, Ph.D., established: “...It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring...” [157]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #63:

Whose realities and myths are those?

Voltaire (1694 – 1778), French writer and philosopher, posited: “...Everything’s fine today, that is our illusion...” [157]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #64:

Is anyone exaggerating about the dynamics of change?

Ian Pearson observes: “...By mid-century, computers will be linked directly into our nervous systems via nanotechnology, which is so small it could connect every neuron in our brains. By about 2040, there will be a backup of our brains in a computer somewhere, so that when you die it won’t be a major career problem...” [140]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #65:

Question: Allegedly, To what extent is the world changing and what are some of the consequences, sometimes infamously ignored?

Dr. Stephen Covey commented: “...The world has profoundly changed … The challenges and complexity we face in our personal lives and relationships, in our families, in our professional lives, and in our organizations are of a different order of magnitude. In fact, many mark 1989 ─ the year we witnessed the fall of the Berlin Wall ─ as the beginning of the Information Age, the birth of a new reality, a sea change of incredible significance ─ truly a new era ─ Being effective as individuals and organizations is no longer merely an option ─ survival in today’s world requires it. But in order to thrive, innovate, excel, and lead in what Covey calls the new Knowledge Worker Age, we must build on and move beyond effectiveness [long-held assumptions, fallacies and flawed beliefs and faulty conventions]…Accessing the higher levels of human genius and motivation in today’s new reality REQUIRES A SEA CHANGE IN THINKING: a new mind-set, a new skill-set, a new tool-set ─ in short, a whole new habit...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #66:

Bringing down a handful of millenarian fallacies in the twentieth-one century?

Gregory S. Paul and Earl Cox argued: “...From Conventional Wisdom to Shocking Probability. Maybe someday, sooner or later, truly intelligent machines will be built. Until that time, speculation will abound. Much of that speculation is based on what might be called ‘Conventional Wisdom,’ the underlying assumptions and conventions we collectively share. We can list some of these assumptions as follows: The next century will be an extension of this one, with increasingly smarter machines being run by people and for people … Because the human mind is linked to a soul, cybernetic machines will never be fully self-aware like we are … If intelligent robots can be built, it will be a long time before they can be made to do what humans do, as well as humans do it. Perhaps centuries will be required … Even after intelligent robots are made, multitudes of humans will continue to exist on earth, and maybe even in space … Human minds and personal identities will never be able to merge with an electromechanical system … Even if it were possible, we humans would refuse to download our minds onto hardware, no matter how tempting and intelligent the new surroundings might be. We believe that cyberbeings will be emotionless, soulless, and humorless mechanical zombies ─ rather like ‘Star Trek’s’ Lt. Commander Data, a somewhat sad android pining for a humanity he will never achieve … No matter how smart they are, digital minds will never have the insight, intuition, and smooth savvy of the human mind. They will forever remain mentally inferior, and our faithful, self- maintaining servants...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #66 (continues:)

“ ...The robots will soon prove our mental and physical superiors. Self-generated enhancements will refine them beyond our control. They will enslave us all except, of course, for a renegade band of rebellious, young, good-looking, daring humans armed with battered, recycled surplus weapons, fearlessly following their craggy but wise leader into a fight for truth, justice, and the hominid way … THIS BOOK ARGUES THAT THE NEXT CENTURY WILL PROVE TO BE NOTHING LIKE THIS ONE, NOR ANY FORECAST SO FAR. COMPUTING POWER, NEUROSCIENCE, AND NANOTECHNOLOGIES ARE ADVANCING SO RAPIDLY THAT THEY WILL COMBINE TO PRODUCE THE MOST SIGNIFICANT EVOLUTIONARY DEVELOPMENTS SINCE THE ORIGIN OF LIFE ITSELF … WE MAINTAIN THAT THE HUMAN MIND AND CONSCIOUS THOUGHT ARE EXCLUSIVELY NATURAL AND PHYSICAL IN ORIGIN AND NATURE. ULTIMATELY, THEIR NATURES AND FUNDAMENTAL PROCESSES ARE KNOWABLE AND CAN BE REPLICATED FOR THE PURPOSES OF PERSONAL IMMORTALITY...” [169]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #67:

Pervasive genetics, pervasive medicine, pervasive diagnostics and pervasive monitoring?

Juan Enriquez explains: “...If it seems like your world has been topsy-turvy over the past few years … Consider what’s coming. Your genetic code will be imprinted on and ID card … For better and worse. Medicines will be tailored to your genes and will help prevent specific diseases for which you may be at risk. (But … your insurance company and your prospective employer may also find out that you are genetically disposed to, say, heart disease, or breast cancer, or Alzheimer’s.)...” [163]

Whatever the lethal consequences, Are you still doggedly insisting on not understanding the rates of hyper-geometrical exponential growth and hence not have a sense of proportions in alignment with the driving forces of the twentieth-one century?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #68:

James John Bell argues, “...We won’t just experience 100 years of progress in the twenty-first century ─ it will be more like 20,000 years of progress...” [161]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #69:

How can we get to a new terra incognita with an old map?

Rowan Gibson postulates: “...The lesson of the last three decades is that nobody can drive to the future on cruise control...” [161]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #70:

Where and how do we live?

Gregory S. Paul and Earl Cox observed: “...We live in strange times, in case you have not noticed. Here we are with our home computers and other high-tech appliances, living what we regard as a normal life … The world we are living in ─ a world that couples Homo sapiens with fast-paced hypertechnology ─ is strange to us because sometimes it feels like what it is, a transient dream .... We are dreaming a strange, waking dream; an inevitably brief interlude sandwiched between the long age of low-tech humanity on the one hand, and the age of human beings transcended on the other. We are living in the latter days of humanity; cybertechnologies will quickly replace us. Just inches of time away exists a speedy reality bearing down on us that we may sense, but do not show on our faces .... While one may be made uncomfortable by the thought of a truly strange 21st century, there is around us an impending sense of arrival ─ a strangeness in the air, an uneasiness, a feeling that deep down, things are starting to cchange in swift, fundamental ways too fuzzy to put a finger on. More than just the onset of the third millennium, it is the quiet before the storm. The products of technology are becoming more curious ─ a little too smart, a little too fast. It’s downright unsettling. And, hey, people aren’t dumb. They know that we have just begun to build smart dumb machines; soon it will be dumb smart machines. Where will it stop? If we continue to build machines smarter than the last ones, and then one that is smarter than that and so on ─ well, you do not have to be a particle physicist to see that the machines cannot keep getting smarter and smarter, yet forever remain dumber than us. Garry ‘John Henry’ Kasparov, chess Grand Master, lost a championship game to a machine for the first time in history this year. Perhaps someday, we’ll hear the battle cry of humanity rallying in desperation: ‘Remember Deep Blue’...” [165]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #71:

Technologies, societies and possibilities?

Freeman Dyson claimed: “...There is nothing so big nor so crazy that one out of a million technological societies may not feel itself driven to do, provided it is physically possible...” [174]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #72:

Minds vs. computational algorithms, man-made computational algorithms?

“...Funny thing, our mind. The moment our software catches up, the mind seems to travel beyond the capability of the software .... [However,] Our minds focus on renditions, darling, not the underlying algorithm. Your analysts and programmers have to deal with algorithm that produces new renditions...” [161] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #73:

Dr. Covey’s lucid perspective becomes greatly supported and refined by Peter Drucker.

Peter Drucker asserted: “...In a few hundred years, when the story of our [current] time is written from a long-term perspective, it is likely that the most important event those historians will see is not technology, not the Internet, not e-commerce [not ‘social media’ ─ so-called]. IT IS AN UNPRECEDENTED CHANGE IN THE HUMAN CONDITION. FOR THE FIRST TIME ─ LITERALLY ─ SUBSTANTIAL AND GROWING NUMBERS OF PEOPLE HAVE CHOICES. FOR THE FIRST TIME, THEY WILL HAVE TO MANAGE THEMSELVES. AND SOCIETY IS TOTALLY UNPREPARED FOR IT...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #74:

And the political angle of the future? By The Honorable Tom Ridge, First Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and Former Governor of Pennsylvania:

“...The political world promises change and the digital world delivers it. And when that change potentially affects our privacy and freedom, we should all pay attention. This is a fascinating, provocative and thoroughly readable look into an uncertain future...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #75:
Internet and yesterday?

Scout Bradner writes: “...We have the Internet that we have today because the Internet of yesterday did not focus on the today of yesterday...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #76:

The rights and the future?

“...Legal scholars can debate whether copyright law mandates a future of ‘authorized use only’ for digital information. The answer may not matter much, because that future is coming to pass through the technologies of digital rights management and trusted systems...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #77:

Future and forces embedded?

“...The forces shaping your future are digital, and you need to understand them...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #78:

Can we picture the future?

“...Will the vast amounts of information now available because of the advances in storage and communication technology actually be usable a hundred or a thousand years in the future, or WILL THE SHIFT FROM PAPER TO DIGITAL MEDIA MEAN THE LOSS OF HISTORY?...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #79:

Regarding the Cyberspace, a primer to Computronium?

John Perry Barlow: “...Governments of the Industrial World, your weary giants of flesh and steel, I come from Cyberspace, the new home of Mind. On behalf of the future, I ask you of the past to leave us alone. You have no so sovereignty where we gather .... We are creating a world that all may enter without privilege or prejudice accorded by race, economic power, military force, or station of birth. We are creating a world where anyone, anywhere may express his or her beliefs, no matter how singular, without fear of being coerced into silence or conformity … In our world, all the sentiments and expressions of humanity, from debasing to the angelic, are parts of a seamless whole, the global conversation of bits .... [Y]ou are trying to ward off the virus of liberty by erecting guard posts at the frontiers of Cyberspace...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #80:

Can we use a chain to represent a metaphor about the future?

“...You can’t understand the knot without understanding the strands, but in the future, the strands need not remain tied up in the same way as they are today...” [155]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #81:

Are there others angles to be added to the compounded perspective under discernment about changed changes?

Ray Kurzweil: “...Supercomputers will achieve one human brain capacity by 2010, and personal computers will do so by about 2020 .... We appear to be programmed with the idea that there are 'things' outside of our self, and some are conscious, and some are not .... We are beginning to see intimations of this in the implantation of computer devices into the human body...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #82:
The world is not analogue anymore. Its quality is only digital and hence emphatically over-mathematical. Ergo, if you don’t attach the future, the future will attack you and outsmart you without a fail.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #83:

Supporting the motions of all of the above in this digital universe of ours, check out the take by the author of “...The World is Flat...”

Thomas Friedman indicates: “...People are always [and wrongfully] assuming that everything that is going to be invented must have been invented already. But it hasn’t...” [139] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #84:

What happens to your vision when you don’t understand that the world is not analog but pervasively ─ increasingly so ─ over-digital?

Muhamad Yunus: “...There eyes were blinded by the knowledge they had...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #85:

Brainy discoveries and the IT revolution?

J. G. Taylor, B. Horowitz, K. J. Friston: “...Now, for the first time, we are observing the brain at work in a global manner with such clarity that we should be able to discover the overall programs behind its magnificent powers...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #86:

From Darwin and well into the present twentieth-one century?

Gregory S. Paul and Earl Cox: “...When Queen Victoria was in her prime, an Englishman, Charles Darwin, discovered a fundamental truth that shook mankind so severely that it remains today a matter of extreme distress and massive denial. Darwin realized that life on our planet is not the recent and fixed product of deity-mediated special creation, but has been constantly changing over a long span of time … The paleontologist who followed Darwin have taught us that time has no respect for species. Whole dynasties of life have been swept away and replaced with new ones. More than 65 million years ago, the world was filled with swift, deadly meat-eaters, including huge tyrannosaurs stalking elephant-sized horned dinosaurs and duck-billed herbivores. Flying pterosaurs were as big and heavy as sailplanes. Small, graceful, predaceous dinosaurs had binocular vision, big brains, and grasping hands. After 170 million years of successful evolution, they achieved the height of variation and power. Resplendent and numerous on the fertile Cretaceous plains, how could it be that within a few years they all would be gone forever? ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #86 (continues:)

“ ...This chilling story suggests a ticking clock for humanity, as well; dare we think of our own extinction? There is ticking clock for humanity, and it may be mere seconds before midnight. TOMORROW IS UPON US, AND WHAT IS ABOUT TO HAPPEN IN THE NEW DAY IS FAR, FAR STRANGER THAN MOST PEOPLE DARE TO THINK … Even Darwin did not realize how right he was, or how far evolution will take us. We should not fault Darwin for his lack of vision. Darwin lived in a time when the modern scientific revolution was just beginning. It was also a time of steam engines, gas lamps, and phrenology. Science, in our late 20th century sense, was still a few years away. Yet even today, few nonscientists have more than an inkling of how life evolved or how technologies such as the automobile, the light switch, or the airplane actually work … WE LIVE IN A HIGH-TECHNOLOGY WORLD, WITH LITTLE APPRECIATION FOR HOW THINGS GOT THE WAY THEY ARE...” [169]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #87:

What is the personal cosmology in the orbit of a person seeking foresight? You capture foresight to construe a cohesive vision, Do you not?

Antonio Machado: “...Man, incurable futurist, is the only traditionalist animal...” [130]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #88:

The name of the game and the point-of-inflection change of game-changers?

“...Which way will the future go? Science fiction authors seem to favor dystopian futures over utopian ones, probably because they make for more interesting plots. BUT SO FAR, AI SEEMS TO FIT IN WITH OTHER REVOLUTIONARY TECHNOLOGIES (PRINTING, PLUMBING, AIR TRAVEL, TELEPHONY) WHOSE NEGATIVE REPERCUSSIONS ARE OUTWEIGHED BY THEIR POSITIVE ASPECTS...” [192]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #89:

A technological and academic institution outsmarting cutting-edge science and technology to a point to generate more wealth than the combination of many countries?

Juan Enriquez: “...Wealth is concentrated and portable. MIT faculty and alumni produce as much wealth as all but Twenty-Two Countries In The World...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #90:

Before we proceed any further, please always remember the following maxim.

“...Everything is somewhat somewhat interrelated to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat connected to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat interconnected to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat intricate to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat involved in everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat inter-associated to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat interlocked to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat inter-coupled to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat inter-joined to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat conjoint to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat inter-tied to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat interdependent to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat correlated to everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat intertwined with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat inter-meshed with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat implicated in everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat entangled with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat entwined with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat tangled with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat knotted with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat interwoven into everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat engaged with everything else....”

“...Everything is somewhat parenthetical to everything else....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #91:

Einstein has an appropriate thought to share: “... [The human being] experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest — a kind of optical delusion of our consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty...” [108] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #92:

Preterit notions to secure being strategically devastated?

Peter Drucker expressed: “...The greatest danger in times of turbulence is not the turbulence; it is to act with yesterday’s logic...” [146]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #93:

What do Alvin and Heidi Toffler can tell us about the 2025’s outlook through Toffler Associates’ assessing?

Toffler Associates posit: “...Yet the opportunities and challenges do not pause. The forces of change are in fact accelerating as technology, communications, and mobility link us in a blurring and buzzing globalizing world.... The image of this future became clearer when we and 40 executives and thought leaders closely examined five specific technology areas and explored their implications for society, business, and government. We examined biotechnology, cyber-technology, nanotechnology, ubiquitous sensing, and wild cards from science and technology. We asked the thought leaders to apply their projections in five crosscutting areas to identify the key technology convergences that would most affect or disrupt society in 2025: economy and wealth, energy and the environment, health and demographics, infrastructure, and governance ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #93 (continues:)

“... We learned that the technologies were changing in ways that made traditional distinctions between disciplines and areas of science decreasingly relevant. Biotechnologists regularly describe nano-scale developments. Nanotechnologists apply insights from genome sequencing. Research is spread, enhanced, and stolen with cyber tools. Research will lead to carbon-free or carbon-neutral technologies that disrupt industries and policies. The blurring of boundaries between sciences are creating convergences. Breakthroughs across disciplines are stimulating accelerating insights and applications...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #94:

As concluding this important report, Toffler Associates argue:

“...Knowledge is being created at such a rate that much of what we know will soon be obsolete .... The technological developments maturing between now and 2025 and the innovative ways they may be applied reflect an acceleration and shift that can seem both promising and challenging to decision makers. In the Industrial Age, developments in steam power, combustion engines, automobiles, aerospace, and telephony seemed slow to mature – their development and spread required large industrial infrastructures. In the Information Age, developments in bio, nano, cyber, and sensors are possible with a smaller and more differentiated infrastructure, and they are occurring simultaneously around the globe. Global information networks are increasing the pace of this technological innovation. This deeper, more widely spread development of knowledge is different from our recent past and portends further changes...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #94 (continues:)

“ ...The convergences of bio, nano, cyber, sensors and wild card technologies are causing even greater acceleration of change. But at the same time, knowledge is being created at such a rate that much of what we know about these technologies and their application rapidly becomes obsolete as it is overtaken by newer discoveries. Our institutions will be challenged to respond to the combination of these technological changes and the many other drivers of change simultaneously. We expect many systems and institutions to be desynchronized by these changes and efforts to resynchronize them will add to the sense of disruption that many people feel .... Many thought leaders we worked with in this effort are highly optimistic. Nearly all who contributed to these findings see technological developments as promising, and as stimuli for new opportunities. At the same time, some cautioned about vulnerabilities and called for leadership and action to address these vulnerabilities before we feel their impact. This report serves as one input to decision makers who can aid us in adapting with the changes and creating our future...” [150]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #95:

The Perpetual Innovation Imperative and Enterprises Impacted by Continuous Change?

“... In the mid-1980s a study by Shell suggested that the average corporate survival rate for large company was about half as long as that of a human being. Since then the pressures on firms have increased enormously from all directions ─ with the inevitable result that business life expectancy is reduced still further. Many studies look at the changing composition of key indices and draw attention to the demise of what were often major firms and in their time key innovators. For example, Foster and Kaplan point out that of the 500 companies originally making up the Standard & Poor 500 list in 1957, only 74 remained on the list through to 1977. Of the top 12 companies which make up the Dow Jones Index in 1900 only one ─ General Electric ─ survives today. Even apparently robust giants like IBM, GM or Kodak can suddenly display worrying sings of mortality, whilst for small firms the picture is often considerably worse since they lack the protection of a large resource base ... Some firms have had to change dramatically to stay in business. For example, a company founded in the early nineteenth century, which had Wellington boots and toilet paper amongst its product range, is now one of the largest and most successful in the world of telecommunications business. Nokia began life as a lumber company, making the equipment and supplies needed to cut down forests in Finland...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #95 (continues:)

“...It moved through into paper and from there into the ‘paperless office’ world of IT ─ and from there into mobile telephones ... Another mobile phone player ─ Vodafone Airtouch ─ grew to its huge size by merging with a firm called Mannesmann which, since its birth in 1870s, has been more commonly associated with the invention and production of steel tubes! TUI owns Thomsom (the travel group) in the UK, and is the largest European travel and tourism services company. Its origins, however, lie in the mines of old Prussia where it was established as a public sector state lead mining and smelting company!...” [197]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #96:

How does a global corporation spell out century 21st-century leadership to the world?

J. W. Marriott, Jr., Chairman and CEO, Marriott International, Inc.: “...Great leaders know and appreciate the value of people. They don’t just listen to the opinions of others, they seek them out. They make sure every member of their team has the opportunity to make a meaningful, lasting contribution. They recognize that their most important responsibility as a leader is to develop their people, give them room to grow and inspire them to realize their full potential. This has long been our philosophy at Marriott, where we believe that if we take great care of our associates, they will take care of our customers...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #97:

Becoming acculturated in mind preparedness by a supreme statesman!

Winston Churchill: “...To every man there comes in his lifetime that special moment when he is figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered a chance to do a very special thing, unique to him and fitted to his talents. What a tragedy if that moment finds him unprepared or unqualified for the work which would be his finest hour...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #98:

The Intelligence Community on Trends?

National Intelligence Council (NIC): “...If you like where events seem to be headed, you may want to take timely action to preserve their positive trajectory. If you do not like where they appear to be going, you will have to develop and implement policies to change their trajectory...” [144]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #99:

The rosy facts about life?

Alvin Toffler claims: “...Change is not merely necessary to life ─ it is life...” [148]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #100:

To further illustrate the impact of downside change, What was The World Trade Center Disaster and Recovery Planning about?

“...On September 11, 2001, two airplanes flew into the World Trade Center (WTC), killing more than 2000 people. All WTC offices were destroyed and many nearby buildings were badly damaged and immediately evacuated. Beyond the loss of human lives, major jammed due to the obvious increased phone activity. In addition, major telecommunication providers such as AT&T and Verizon lost major portion of services because their major switching centers and computer systems were located in areas near the WTC. This impacted several major clients, including Lufthansa Airlines which lost telephone services for its sales offices in downtown Manhattan. Lufthansa had chosen AT&T as its primary and Verizon as a backup provider. With both facilities impacted, Lufthansa was left without a telephone service for almost a week...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #99 (continues:)

“....Many companies that relied on the Internet to conduct business were not severely impacted. In fact, the Internet became a viable alternate vehicle for communications in that disastrous week. In my own office in New Jersey that afternoon, we could not get the news from TVs (no TVs were available in the offices), so we all visited the news sites from CNN, FOX and others to understand what was going on. Internet telephony and email became the primary source of communicating with family and friends to let them know that we were OK .... Merrill Lynch had over 9,000 employees at the WTC and the nearby World Financial Center. Most were unharmed and were relocated to other places of work quickly and successfully. Merrill resumed its business later in the same day and did not suffer as much as others. The main reason was that it had redundant telecommunications capabilities and a good disaster recovery plan. Merrill had rehearsed the plan four months earlier, so it was better prepared for a disaster than others. The plan included priorities for business activities, so that high priorities activities could be brought online quicker. It also included detailed procedures for restoring critical applications with procedures that included necessary technologies, personnel, and facilities for a quick restoration in case of a disaster. Logistics were also in place for transportation of personnel and equipment, with provisions for housing and feeding employees for up to 8 weeks. This disaster recovery plan went into action within minutes after the incident and Merrill was operational later that day...” [189]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #100:

Never predicting, just formulating endless, savvy scenarios?

Dr. James A. Ogilvy, Ph.D.: “...Because time is real, and the future unpredictable, the challenge of carving a path into the future calls for a different way of thinking than the old, mechanical methods of strategic planning. In order to anticipate wholly new industries like the personal computer industry, it’s not enough to make predictions based on old assumptions. You need to imagine alternative scenarios based on new assumptions. You need to imagine alternative scenarios based on new assumptions. Those new assumptions need more than new numbers...” [162]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #101:

Can one make technological growth for good?

Gordon E. Moore: “...No exponential is forever … but we can delay ‘forever’...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #102:

Which come preeminently first?

The undersigned and the present material’s author indicated:‭ “...If the PRESENT is a function of the FUTURE, Does the FUTURE, accordingly, elicit in the PRESENT?...” [129]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #103:

In a world of counter-intuitiveness, What does it take to advance your enterprise to a forward position?

“...‘A slow sort of country’ said the Red Queen. ‘Now where, you see, it takes all the running you can do to keep in the same place. IF YOU WANT TO GET SOMEWHERE ELSE, YOU MUST RUN AT LEAST TWICE AS FAST AS THAT!...” (Lewis Carroll, Alice through the Looking Glass) [197]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #104:

How does time elapse?

[Dame (Cicely) Veronica Wedgwood] C.V. Wedgwood (July/20/1910 – March/09/1997) observed:

“...History is lived forwards but it is written in retrospect. We know the end before we consider the beginning and we can never wholly recapture what it was to know the beginning only...” [217]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #105:

The clever problem-solving pathway?

Eliezer S. Yudkowsky indicated: “...Our sole responsibility is to produce something smarter than we are; any problems beyond that are not ours to solve ... [T]here are not hard problems, only problems that are hard to a certain level of intelligence. Move the bit upwards [in level of intelligence], and some problems will suddenly move from ‘impossible’ to ‘obvious.’ Move a substantial degree upwards, and all of them will become obvious...” [142] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #106:

From transgenic crops into vital vaccines?

Juan Enriquez: “...The skin and pulp of the orange that sits on your desk … Is just packing … What matters is the code contained in the seeds. Each seed has a long string of gene data that looks like … The seed guides growth, how a tree and its leaves develop … The size, flavor, color, shape of fruits. If you can read the code … And rewrite it … You can turn an orange into a vaccine, a contraceptive, a polyester. Each of these things has already been done in corn. Today, bananas and potatoes can vaccinate you against things like cholera, hepatitis, [and] diarrhea. You can harvest bulletproof fibers … Grow medicines in tobacco. And it’s not just apples, oranges, and corn that are rapidly becoming different organisms .... Mosquitoes are flying hypodermic needles. They can infect you with malaria, dengue, and other awful things. They do so by transferring a little bit of genetic code through their saliva … Into your bloodstream … Which then reprograms part of the way your cells operate … By changing your genetic code ever so slightly … In ways that can make you very sick. So why not engineer mosquito genes so that they have the opposite effect? If mosquito saliva contained antibodies .... Or if you made it hard for malaria to mutate inside a mosquito’s body … You could immunize people and animals … By making sure they were bitten. Because the language of genes (A, T, C, G) is the same for all creatures … You can mix species. If you are an artist, the genes that make jellyfish fluoresce at night … Can be used to make a bunny glow under black light. If you are an M.D., the same genes can be placed in monkeys to serve as markers … Which help identify cures for diseases like Alzheimer’s and cancer...” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #107:

In speaking of sense of direction, Frank Kafka argues: “...There are some things one can only achieve by a deliberate leap in the opposite direction. One has to go abroad in order to find the home one has lost...” [126]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #108:

Can we get a hindsight in reversal, please, now?

Walter Adolf Gropius (1883 – 1969) stated, “...Let’s wish, let’s imagine, let’s build together the new construction of the future...” [130]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #109:

Success via being well-informed and even-though information is not knowledge?

Peter L. Bernstein: “...The information you have is not the information you want. The information you want is not the information you need. The information you need is not the information you can obtain. The information you can obtain costs more than you want to pay...” [127]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #110:

In speaking of Chinese spiritual leaders in times of antiquity, a sage told his disciples, “...Attempt not to live in difficult times; those are the interesting ones indeed...” [129]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #111:

In China of antiquity there used to be some wise words — as per some spiritual leaders — along these lines: “...The first fifty years are to learn. The next fifty years are to labor...” [129]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #112:

The undersigned and the present material’s author indicated: “...Declare the past, recover yesterday, analyze the present, enjoy today, and conceive and reinvent tomorrow...” [129]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #113:

What about how we construe our thinking? Let’s see Ambrose Bierce’s take on it: “...[Brain is,] an apparatus with which we think that we think...” [130] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #114:

R. Buckminster Fuller established: “...If humanity does not opt for integrity we are through completely. It is absolutely touch and go. Each one of us could make the difference...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #115:

Recalling that this material is about the impact and the points of inflections fostered by many modes of change and to the utter end of spoken-of change, John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid make the following claim:

“...Technological and social systems shape each other … technologies — such as gunpowder, the printing press, the railroad, the telegraph and the Internet — can shape society in profound ways. But on the other hand, social systems — in the form of governments, the courts and informal organizations, social movements, professional networks, local communities, market institutions and so forth — shape, moderate and redirect the raw power of technologies...” [56]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #116:

For this rate of change, What else are you going to need?

George Horace Lorimer (attributed to): “...You've got to get up every morning with determination if you're going to go to bed with satisfaction...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #117:

Mind, Evolution and Universe?

As Princeton physicist Freeman Dyson put it: “...Mind, through the long course of biological evolution, has established itself a moving force in our little corner of the universe. Here on this small planet, mind has infiltrated matter and has taken control. It appears to me the tendency of mind to infiltrate and control matter is a law of nature...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #118:

Evolution and change?

Carl Sagan: “...Two billion years ago, our ancestors were microbes; a half-billion years ago, fish; a hundred million years ago, something like mice; ten million years ago, arboreal apes; and a million years ago, proto-humans puzzling the taming of fire. Our evolutionary lineage is marked by mastery of change. IN OUR TIME, THE PACE IS QUICKENING...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #119:

Machines and humans playing the mice-cats hunting game?

Rodney Brooks: “...Our machines will become much more like us, and we will become much more like our machines...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #120:

Is the Economy under what pressures?

“...Since 1995, the year in which the new economy based on information technology began to boom, the revenues have not been proportional to productivity and, during the last five years, the gap between income and productivity has been dramatic. Between 1995 and 2006 the productivity growth per employee superseded employees’ actual wages in 340%. Between 2001 and 2006, the first six years of George H. Bush’s presidency, this gap further deepened in an alarming 779%....” [58]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #121:

How Do We Behave In Front Of Inflicting-Points Change?

“...'...Our surroundings (the context in which we live) define the ease we conduct our daily lives. As human beings, we look for normalcy in our lives. We try to extrapolate the future by looking at the immediate past. We don't like when the rules of the game change...'...Unfortunately for those who don't like change, the context of our lives is in a state of constant rearrangement .... Diane suggests that all of us have something to learn about our interrelationships around the globe: '...If one theme should resonate from September 11th, it is that the lives of our children are desperately dependent upon how children around the world view their own fates...'....” [204]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #122:

The Ever-Quickening Pace!

Dr. James Canton, Ph.D. argues: “...If you were to disappear and come back after 90 days, the Net would have doubled, bandwidth would have increased by a third, and there would be a half a dozen innovations you have missed...” [205]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #123:

On the pace and mode of contemporary change, Peter Cochrane, BT’s former visionary head of research (subsequently cofounder of The Concept Lab), observes:

“...When we move toward the world of the bit we encounter a new world of multiple dimensions. This world is a network of n-dimensional space, of multiple copies, existence, connectivity, locations and form. Information can be simultaneously distributed or clustered, singular or plural, static or dynamical, living or dead, past or present, real-time or warped, accelerate or delayed...” [201]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #124:

What precludes you from being lucid as per Twentieth-One Century ?

Arthur Scopenhaur: “...Everyone takes the limits of his own vision for the limits of the world...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #125:

Fuzzy-logic discernment and counter-intuitiveness must take into consideration many pathways among many others, including those by Buddhism.

For instance, Kalu Rinpoche establishes:

“...We live in illusion and the appearance of things. There is a reality. We are that reality. When we understand this, we see that we are nothing. And being nothing, we are everything. That is all...” [68]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #126:

What is dynamical and what is permanent indeed?

Heraclitus — Greek Philosopher (c.540 — c. 480 BC) stated: “...No man ever steps into the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same men...” [105]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #127:

And a westerner’s view on wisdom. Theodore Roosevelt: “...Nine-tenths of our wisdom consists in being wise timely...” [119]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #128:

Reality, Mind and Buddhism by a Westerner’s View!

A citation on Gary Hamel’s Leading The Revolution book: “...Alan Kay tells a wonderful little story about how he came to recognize this deep truth: On the third day of a conference at a Buddhist center, I asked people why they put their palms together several times a day. The Buddhists believe that the world is an illusion, but we have to go along with the illusion for efficiency reasons. When they put their hands together it is a semicolon, an acknowledgment that whatever they may think is going on right now is largely a fabrication of their own mind...” [88]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #129:

World and vision?

“...When the world and the mind are both transparent, this is true vision that which doesn’t exist doesn’t exist in relation to that which exists. This is true vision. By means of such vision nothing is seen and nothing is not seen .... The mind and the world are opposites, and vision arises when they meet. When your mind doesn’t stir inside, the world doesn’t arise outside. When the world and mind are both transparent, this is true vision. And such understanding is true understanding...” By Bodhidharma, Indian Zen Buddhist monk who brought Zen from India to China (circa 520 A.D.) [89]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #130:

Courage and success by the prominent British premier.

Winston Churchill argued, “...Courage is the capacity to go from failure to failure with increased enthusiasm!...” [111] If we really wish to make a substantial difference, we’re going to need this personal cosmological trait lavishly I am not afraid to assert.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #131:

Succeeding in reversal?

Piet Hein: “...The road to wisdom? Well, it’s plain and simple to express. Err and err and err again but less and less and less...” [89]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #132:

A distant past and also a distant future, right here?

Edward Fredkin (born 1934): “...A third implication of the concept is that because the vast preponderance of the lifetime of the universe lies in the distant future rather than in the past, the historical achievements of life and mind are meager foreshadowings of the starring role that intelligent life is likely to play in shaping the future of the cosmos. Indeed, this new way of looking at the intimate linkage of life, mind, and the cosmos suggests a novel way of thinking about the ultimate destiny of our destiny of our universe...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #133:

How does a psychologist conceive the past-present-future interrelationship?

Dr. Philip Zimbardo, Ph.D., “...Consider any decision you had to make recently: Do I keep working or go out to play; take one more drink before driving home; take a chance and cheat on my taxes or an exam; practice safe sex or just do it; resistor gives into temptation? As you contemplate what you will do, you are influenced by a number of factors. For some people, the world is limited to all the forces they perceive in their immediately present situation, their biological urges, their social setting and that which others are doing or urging them to do, and the sensuous appeal of the stimulus itself. Those folks who usually limit their decision-making be referring only to the current circumstances are Present-oriented. Other people making a decision in the same setting downplay the present and search their memories for similar past situations; they recall what they did in the past and how these decisions turned out. These folks are Past-oriented. Finally, a third type of person makes up her or his mind entirely based on imagined future consequences — the costs and benefits — of an action. If anticipated costs outweigh anticipated benefits or gains, they won’t go forward. They only go forward when they expect gains to predominance…”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #133 (continues:)

“....The ideal time profile is a balance of being high on the past-positive, moderately high on the present-hedonistic and future, and low on the past-negative and present-fatalistic times perspectives .... In other words, conscientious people regularly think about future consequences before making a decision … I believe present transcendence and future hopefulness are essential components of a successful therapeutic intervention .... Our goal is to help you reclaim yesterday, enjoy today, and master tomorrow. To do so, we’ll give you new ways of seeing and working with your past, present, and future ...” [105]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #134:

Rowan Gibson in Rethinking the Future observes:

“...For a long time we have known deep down that the future will be different from the past. Every science fiction writer, from Jules Verne to William Gibson, has reminded us of that. But we have stubbornly refused to believe is that the future will be different than we expect it to be. Most of us anticipate ... But why? ... This is a simple question, that has been asked since man first began to ponder. The good news is that we now have answers to this question, thanks to emergence of the complexity science. In fact, we not only gain insights for the why, but also, on how we can gain leverage on such unreliable change...” [201]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #135:

Complexity growing more complex in an ever-faster paced world?

Chris Harris contends, “...Yet, it is with these new possibilities that come equally great challenges; and it is important to understand what these new challenges mean ... To begin with, it means greater complexity in terms of the design work and diversity of technologies and skills needed to realize such composite invention. It also means effectively managing this new magnitude of complexity at a faster pace ... It means that the linear business world we have come to know so well, that unfolds in a fairly predictable manner, quickly falls to new markets that form in discontinuities, sometimes unrecognizable patterns; where technologies that appear overnight bleed into unknown applications, then become obsolete as abruptly as they came; where competitors from remote industries that you thought unlikely to enter your market, totally redefine and take over your most valuable sector...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #135 (continues:)

“ … It means that today's events move along so fast they have little bearing on the outcomes of tomorrow; where cumulative and hard-earned experience accounts for less, and where new, quite radical ways of thinking provide for the future ... It means a time in which best practice and procedure have not yet been set or written, where rapid learning and expansive knowledge oversee the rules of the game, and where foresight and imagination become the predominant forces for competition ... And most significant of all, it means that the kinds of interconnection we make between known and unknown ideas become the engine for economic growth, whether for an individual, local enterprise or global institution ... All told, this new era brings with it the utmost sweeping threats, yet the most wide-based opportunities the business world has yet seen...” [201]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #136:

DNA, complexity and digital information system?

Edward Fredkin (bio at http://bit.ly/bMVDlb) described his theory in an interview with science writer Robert Wright: “...What I’m saying is that at the most basic level of complexity an information process runs what we think of as physics. At the much higher level of complexity life, DNA — you know, the biochemical functions — are controlled by a digital information system. Then, at another level, our thought processes are basically information processing...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #137:

Universe with a purpose?

Robert Wright (bio at http://bit.ly/azFvZG), in response to Fredkin, puts it: “...Fredkin believes that the universe is very literally a computer and that it is being used by someone, or something, to solve a problem. It sounds like a good news/bad joke: the good news is that our lives have purpose; the bad news is that their purpose is to help some remote hacker pi to nine jillion decimal places...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #138:

The artificial man?

The philosopher Thomas Hobbes (bio at http://bit.ly/5vaI4) offered an uncanny preview of the science of artificial intelligence in his masterpiece Leviathan [description viewable at http://bit.ly/16Qymw] published in 1651: “...Nature (the Art whereby God hath made and governs the World) is by the Art of man, as in many other things, so in this also imitated, that it can make an Artificial Animal. For seeing life is but a motion of Limbs, the beginning whereof is in the principal part within; why we not say that all Automata (Engines that move themselves by springs and wheels as doth a watch) have an artificial life?...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #139:

Is there some sort of highest-order entity regulating us?

David Jay Brown asked a medic, “...What is your perspective on the concept of God and how spirituality played a role in your view of medicine?...” Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum, M.D. responded: “...If everything is God, Goddess, Spirit — whether you want to call it — it’s all one. It’s all connected, and that means that all that’s going on is God looking at God’s self. So it’s all simply different perspectives, and that’s a fascinating thing. That means nobody is cut off from God, whether they are atheists or whatever. You don’t have to believe in God for Spirit to love you and be present, so it means that nobody is right and nobody is wrong. It’s all simply different perspectives, which is very freeing, because you don’t have to battle anybody. You just have to do your own thing .... This also allows us to recognize our own connection to spirit, which is very healing, because it allows that energy to flow into us, and allows us to stay whole and connected. So that’s a very powerful thing. I mean, my whole life is about Spirit and about God, or Goddess. To think of God as only a man sounds like an insult to God. It’s pretty limiting because God is everything. It also means that nothing and no one is better or worse than anybody else. And there’s this critical thing that happens, because that’s the touchstone through much of my life — to recognize I am equal of all beings, and no one is lesser than me. That means there’s nobody that I meet that’s better than I am, or that I’m better than them. We’re all different perspectives of God. We’re all equal, and we’re all divine, everybody...” [107]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #140:

Taking care of oneself to make the difference?

Descartes: “...I think therefore I am...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #141:

Space, evolution and universe?

Cosmologist Frank Tipler (bio at http://bit.ly/cmsdLs) has bluntly stated: “...Almost all of space and time lies in the future. By focusing attention only on the past and present, science has ignored almost all of reality, it is about time science decided to study the future evolution of the universe...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #142:

History and approaching a singularity?

Information theorist John von Nuemann (bio at http://bit.ly/2zfuto) in the 1950s: “...The ever accelerating progress of technology … gives the appearance of approaching some essential singularity in the history of the race beyond which human affairs, as we known them, could not continue...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #143:

Locating the Technological Singularity’s domicile?

Michael Anissimov: “...When the first transhuman intelligence is created and launches itself into recursive self-improvement, a fundamental discontinuity is likely to occur, the likes of which I can’t even begin to predict...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #144:

Ray Kurzweil and the Staggering Secret? (2010)

“...That was Kurzweil's real secret, and back in 1965 nobody guessed it. Maybe not even him, not yet. But now, 46 years later, Kurzweil believes that we're approaching a moment when COMPUTERS WILL BECOME INTELLIGENT, AND NOT JUST INTELLIGENT BUT MORE INTELLIGENT THAN HUMANS. WHEN THAT HAPPENS, HUMANITY — OUR BODIES, OUR MINDS, OUR CIVILIZATION — WILL BE COMPLETELY AND IRREVERSIBLY TRANSFORMED. He (Ray Kurzweil) believes that THIS MOMENT IS NOT ONLY INEVITABLE BUT IMMINENT. ACCORDING TO HIS CALCULATIONS, THE END OF HUMAN CIVILIZATION AS WE KNOW IT IS ABOUT 35 YEARS AWAY...” [213] Parentheses are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #145:

What should we find out — with maximum rigor — in history?

William Churchill: “...The further backward you look, the further forward you can see...” [104]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #146:

The geometrically non-linear human progress!

Ray Kurzweil indicates, “...Von Neumann makes two important observations here: acceleration and singularity. The first idea is that human progress is exponential … rather than linear .... The second is that exponential growth is seductive, starting out slowly and virtually in-noticeably, but beyond the knee of the curve it turns explosive and profoundly transformative. The intelligence that will emerge [post-Singularity] will continue to represent the human civilization. In other words, future machines will be human, even if they are not biological. This will be the next step in evolution, the next high-level paradigm shift .... Most of the intelligence of our civilization will ultimately be nonbiological. By the end of this century, it will be trillions of trillions of times more powerful than [un-enhanced] human intelligence...” [86] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #147:

If we fail to commit to development and research of proper science and technology are we enslaving ourselves?

“...A bitter controversy concerning whether humanity should build godlike massively intelligent machines .... [Dr. Kevin Warwick, Ph.D. literally argues:] humanity will have to confront the prospect of being replaced by a new dominant species, namely, ultra intelligent robots controlled by ultra intelligent artificial brains … ‘Cyborgians’ are people who look to technically upgrade their bodies to become ‘cyborgs,’ i.e. part machine, part human … I hope that by enhancing ourselves, we humans can have our cake and eat it too by achieving the dream of attaining the godlike abilities that Hugo [de Garis, Ph.D.] talks about by converting ourselves … without having to pay the cost of a major war. In a sense I am looking at a sort of compromise ─ rather than having ultra intelligent artificial brains acting against humanity, we join with them .... I sincerely hope it will not come to this sort of end game in the real world. Hugo’s scenario of a major war late this century, in which billions of people die, due to the use of advanced 21st century weaponry, is extremely depressing, and I firmly hope he is wrong, dead wrong, for the sake of humanity’s (and cyborgian) survival .... Hugo’s reasoning is frighteningly persuasive, even though my viscera reject what he is saying. The fact that he is pioneering the new field of ‘artificial brains’ only increases the credibility of his vision. If anyone in the world is in a good position to predict the future impact of advanced artificial brains on humanity, it must be Hugo .... If many decades into the future, Hugo is proven to be correct in saying that ‘the species dominance issue will dominate our global politics this century,’ then he will have become one of the major thinkers of the 21st century. With no offense to Hugo, I hope that he will be shown to have been wrong, to be shown to have exaggerated, and overreacted; because if not, the fate that he is suggesting will befall our grandchildren, is too horrible to grasp fully for all humanity, what he would call ‘gigadeath!’...” [179] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #148:

What about the Technology 25 Years Hence?

New York Times, as of December 28, 2010, pertaining to Ray Kurzweil’s arguments:

“...If you plot the basic measures of the price to performance and capacity of information technologies (for example, computer instructions per second per constant dollar, bits of memory per dollar, or the total number of bits being moved around over the Internet), they follow remarkably smooth — and foreseeable — trajectories. This observation goes well beyond Moore’s Law (which says you can place twice as many transistors on an integrated circuit every two years); in the case of computation, it goes back to the 1890 American census, long before Gordon Moore was even born .... What’s predictable is that these measures grow exponentially, not linearly, though our intuition about the future is linear, which is hard-wired in our brains. This makes a remarkable difference. Thirty steps linearly gets you to 30, whereas 30 steps exponentially (2, 4, 8, 16. . .) gets you to a billion .... And it’s not just electronics and communications that follow this exponential course. It applies as well to health, medicine and its related field of biology. The Human Genome Project, for instance, saw the amount of genetic sequencing double and the cost of sequencing per base pair come down by half each year .... A computer that fit inside a building when I was a student now fits in my pocket, and is a thousand times more powerful despite being a million times less expensive .... In another quarter century, that capability will fit inside a red blood cell and will again be a billion times more powerful per dollar...” [185]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #149:

Cambrian explosion and the future?

James N. Gardner: “...It should never be clear that the future will differ radically from the past; it will be at least different as the radically new world of biological complexity and diversity ushered in the Cambrian Explosion was from the preceding era .... The central point is that collateral advances in sciences seemingly far removed from cosmology can help dissipate the intellectual limitations imposed by common sense and naïve human intuition. And, in an uncanny reprise of the Lyell/Darwin intellectual synergy, it is a realization of the vastness of time and history that gives rise to the crucial insight. Only in this instance, the vastness of which I speak is the vastness of future time and future history...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #150:

Which common sense is that? Does it have the gold seal by Einstein?

Marvin Minsky: “...Common sense is not a simple thing [given that is not a definition but a truth-seeking process]. Instead, it is an immense society of hard-earned practical ideas ─ of multitudes of life-learned rules and exceptions, dispositions and tendencies, balances and checks...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #151:

Past, future, and baby universes?

University of Chicago cosmologist Sean Carroll: “...The [observed] arrow of time in our [observed] universe is puzzling because the fundamental laws of physics themselves are symmetric and don’t seem to discriminate between the past and future .... In our patch of the cosmos, time just so happens to be moving forward because of its initial low entropy, but there are others where this is not the case. The far past and the far future are filled with these other baby universes, and they would each think that the other had its arrow of time backwards. Time’s arrow isn’t a basic aspect of the universe as a whole, just a hallmark of the little bit we see...” [86] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #151:

The Largest Book! Which one is it? Is it the largest book or one of the sub-largest books?

Galileo ascertained, “...Philosophy is written in this grand book — I mean the Universe — which stands continually open to our gaze. But the book cannot be understood unless one first learns to comprehend the language and read the characters in which it is written...” [86]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #152:

Niels Bohr, Nobel Prize-winning physicist: “...The opposite of a false statement is a correct statement. The opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth...” [89]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #153:

Counter-seeing in order to discover?

Andre Gide (1869 – 1951) signaled, “...Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #154:

The influence to bias understanding?

Upton Sinclair: “...It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #155:

How does history relate to consciousness?

Jacob Burckhardt, attributed to, (1818 – 1897): “...History is nature’s disruption caused by the awakening of consciousness...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #156:

Who is your teacher that is not outside of your own self?

Brian Tracy: “...No one lives long enough to learn everything they need to learn starting from scratch. To be successful, we absolutely, positively have to find people who have already paid the price to learn the things that we need to learn to achieve our goals...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #157:

Relatives and absolutes?

Sir Winston Churchill: “...The era of procrastination, of half-measures, of soothing and baffling expedients, of delays, is coming to a close. In its place, we are entering a period of consequences ...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #158:

What is the fundamental practical methodology towards root motivations under systemic and systematic yet empirical approach as it was observed by William Hazlitt?

“...Science is the desire to know the causes...” [210]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #159:

It's impossible to run enterprises without the grounds and basis to apply in action!

Einstein: “...Our theories determine what we measure...” [116]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #160:

Improbabilities working on behalf of the learned?

Louis Pasteur: “...Chance favors the prepared mind ...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #161:

Science and spirituality?

Albert Einstein proclaimed, “...I hold that the cosmic religious feeling is the strongest motive in fostering scientific research...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #162:

You’re your own leader?

Mother Teresa: “... Do not wait for leaders; do it alone, person to person ...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #163:

From happiness to useful service?

Henry Ford (1863 – 1947), “...Wealth, like happiness, is never attained when sought after directly. It comes as a by-product of providing a useful service...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #164:

Is that a reasonable optimistic person?

Dr. Kathleen Jennison Goonan, M.D. established: “...Yesterday’s options are gone...” [91]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #165:

A Wealth Of Future, Whether You Board It Or Not?

Alvin Toffler points out, “...The future is being colonized all the time by people who have the resources, who do spend time thinking about it, planning for it and trying to shape it in their direction...” [206]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #166:

Dimensional minds?

Oliver Wendell Holmes offers perspective: “...A mind, once stretched by a new idea, never regains its original dimensions...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #167:

Credit and predictions?

Louis V Gerstner, Jr. Former CEO, IBM observed, “... No credit can be given for predicting rain — only for building arks ...” [143]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #168:

Knowing Not Knowing?

Donald Rumsfeld established, “...As we know, there are known knowns. There are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns. That is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns, the ones we don’t know we don’t know...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #169:

Building a bridge?

Author Unknown, “.....If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door [you create pre-conditions for and by you]...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #170:

Perpetually upping the mind?

Albert Einstein sentenced, “...The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #171:

How do you distribute modernity?

William Gibson, “...The FUTURE is already here; it’s just not evenly distributed...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #172:

Orders misunderstood?

Henry Miller declared: “...Confusion is a word we have invented for an order which is not [yet] understood...” [111] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #173:

Progress and crime?

Albert Einstein commented, “...Technological progress is like an ax in the hands of a pathological criminal...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #174:

What stays in place?

Christian Bovee: “...When all else is lost, the future still remains...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #175:

Fearing what?

Thomas Fuller reasons, “...He that fears the future may enjoy the present...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #176:

Calling the Future what?

Tennessee Williams, “...The future is called ‘perhaps,’ which is the only possible thing to call the future. And the important thing is not to allow that to scare you...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #177:

Having or not having a tempo?

James Petersen: “...If you afraid for your future, you don’t have a present...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #178:

Which evil is the least worst?

Francesco Guicciardini: “...To relinquish a present good through apprehension of a future evil is in most instances unwise … from a fear which may afterward turn out groundless, you lost the good that lay within your grasp....” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #179:

Handy futures?

Thomas E. Dewey, “...We need not be afraid of the future, for the future will be in our hands...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #180:

Fearing change?

E. H. Harriman, “...It is never safe to look into the future with eyes of fear...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #181:

Anxious and miserable?

Marcus Annaes Seneca argues, “...The mind that is anxious about the future is miserable...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #182:

A heart and a fear?

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: “...Go forth to meet the shadowy Future without fear and with a manly heart...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #183:

Is the mind wrongly operated?

John Locke, “...Fear is an uneasiness of the mind, upon the thought of a future evil likely to befall us...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #184:

Uncertainties over certainty?

William Sloane Coffin: “...I’m deglitched that the future is unsure. That’s the way it should be...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #185:

What is the objective?

Clinical leader Dr. Kathleen Jennison Goonan, M.D., “...The goal here [in the beginning of the third millennium] is to understand the enablers [the driving forces out of which some futurists comfortably depict ‘trends’ — so-called —] for change [potential upsides] as well as the barriers [imminent downsides]...” [91] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #186:

Is the future meant to be bold?

Alfred North Whitehead, “...It is the business of the future to be dangerous...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #187:

What purpose to set out for?

Robert M. Pirsig, “...To live only for some future goal is shallow. It’s the sides of the mountain that sustain life, not the top...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #188:

The advantageous mind?

Samuel Johnson, “...Present opportunities are neglected, and attainable good is slighted, by minds busied in extensive ranges and intent upon future advantages...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #189:

The mind-hand connection?

B. C. Forbes, “...Our future and our fate lie in our wills more than in our hands, for our hands are but the instruments of our wills...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #190:

Determining the future?

Gerald Jampolsky, “...No way exists in the present to accurately determine the future effect of the least of our actions...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #191:

Are you recalling the future?

Corrie ten Boom, “...Memories are the key not to the past, but to the future...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #192:

Aching lessons to learn?

Hugh White: “.....When you make a mistake, don’t look back at it long. Take the reason of the thing into your mind, and then look forward. Mistakes are lessons of wisdom. The past cannot be changed. The future is yet in your power...” [71]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #193:

Imaginary Present and a Fabricated Future?

“...The part of Eternity with some small fraction of which we have a slight and regrettable acquaintance. A moving line called the Present parts it from an imaginary period known as the Future. These two grand divisions of Eternity, of which the one is continually effacing the other, are entirely unlike. The one is dark with sorrow and disappointment, the other bright with prosperity and joy .... Yet the Past is the Future of yesterday, the Future is the Past of to-morrow. They are one — the knowledge and the dream...” [72]

A fightable time?

William E. Gladstone (1809 — 1898), “...You cannot fight against the future. Time is on our side...” [72]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #194:

What are you inventing?

Alan Kay designates (1940 - ), “...The best way to predict the future is to invent it...” [72]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #195:

How far can ever-progressing and ever-diverting changed changes take us?

Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881, Russian novelist) describes, “...But dost thou know what will be tomorrow?...” [168]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #196:

Change to change what or not to be changed into which?

Milan Kundera (1929 - ) pronounces, “...The only reason people want to be masters of the future is to change the past...” [72]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #197:

Dreaming progress and modernity?

Eleanor Roosevelt utters, “...The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams...” [73]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #198:

De-learning and un-learning for Life?

Alvin Toffler indicates, “...In the world of the future, the new illiterate will be the person who has not learned to learn...” [73]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation #199:

Guiding to which place?

Albert Einstein established, “... Teachers are messengers from the past and an escort to the future ...” [73]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 200:

Geography allocated by times?

Alison Lurie (1926 - ) stated, “...As one went to Europe to see the living past, so one must visit Southern California to see the future...” [74]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 201:

History and the train?

Dwight David Eisenhower (1890 — 1969), “...Neither a wise man nor a brave man lies down on the tracks of history to wait for the train of the future to run over him...” [75]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 202:

Imprudence?

Tacitus observed, “...Light-minded men are improvident of the future ... ...” [76]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 203:

Youth and future?

Franklyn Delano Roosevelt: “...We cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future....” [77]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 204:

Forgiveness and future?

Paul Boese, “...Forgiveness does not change the past, but it does enlarge the future....” [77]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 205:

Pencil your map?

Jon Bon Jovi, “...Map out your future, but do it in pencil...” [77]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 206:

Even with the advent of Big Data, Is everyone ready for quantitative analysis and for the beloved algorithms?

“...The desirable use for numbers is long. Yet very few on that list are feasible. ANYTHING INVOLVING HUMAN BEHAVIOR IS SUFFICIENTLY COMPLEX THAT A DISCRETE NUMBER CANNOT BE TIED TO IT...” [99] (ISBN-13: 978-0135511107).

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 207:

Future and responsibility?

George Bernard Shaw, “...We are made wise not by the recollection of our past, but by the responsibility for our future...” [77]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 208:

Future and humankind?

Richard P. Feynman, “...We are at the very beginning of time for the human race. It is not unreasonable that we grapple with problems. But there are tens of thousands of years in the future. Our responsibility is to do what we can, learn what we can, improve the solutions, and pass them on...” [121]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 209:

Time and definitions?

Charles Caleb Colton, “...Time is the most indefinable yet paradoxical of things; the past is gone, the future is not to come, and the present becomes the past even while we attempt to define it, and, like the flash of lightning, at once exists and expires...” [77]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 210:

One of the most important French-Canadian premiers, to this end, makes an awesome quotation. Canadian Premier Pierre Trudeau (1919 — 2000):

“...The twentieth century really belongs to those who will build it ... The future can be promised to no one...” [70]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 211:

Albert Einstein hence indicates, “...It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer...” [61]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 212:

What are we?

William Shakespeare, “...We know what we are, but know not what we may be [in the future]...” [142] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 213:

As it was communicated to TIME in 2010, What is the time-line predicted for a maximum technological convergence, emergence, and technological singularity?

“... At 2045, in that year, he (Kurzweil) estimates, given the vast increases in computing power and the vast reductions in the cost of same, the quantity of artificial intelligence created will be about a billion times the sum of all the human intelligence that exists today...” [213] Parentheses are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 214:

Machines harnessing the monopoly of pervasive intelligence?

Irving John Good: “...Let an ultraintelligent machine be defined as a machine that can surpass all the intellectual activities of any man however clever. Since the design of machines is one of these intellectual activities, an ultraintelligent machine could design even better machines; there would then unquestionably be an ‘intelligence explosion,’ and the intelligence of man would be left far behind. Thus the first ultraintelligent machine is the last invention that man need ever make...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 215:

Will humans be subjects to monarchical bots?

Peter Menzel and Faith D’Aluisio, “...Around the world, scientists and engineers are participating in a high-stakes race to build the first intelligent robot. Many robots already exist ─ automobile factories are full of them. But the new generation of robots will be something else: smart machines that act ever more like living creatures .... What will happen then? With our prosthetic limbs, titanium hips, and artificial eyes, we are already beginning to resemble our machines. And when we implant chips in our bodies to connect ourselves directly to computers, the likeness will become only more pronounced. Science fiction will have become science fact ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 215 (continues):

“ … Meanwhile ─ and equally important ─ our machines are beginning to resemble us. Robotic spiders, crabs, geckos, and dogs are already spilling from the laboratories. The next steps are to re-create Homo sapiens itself and then go beyond. Robots can already walk, talk, and dance; they can react to human facial expressions and obey verbal commands. When scientists go on to create fully autonomous robots with greater intelligence than human beings, will they be our partners or our rivals? Will it be a simply a robotic revolution or a true extension of evolution? Could machines and humankind meld into a single species─Robo sapiens?...” [164]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 216:

Either through flesh or silicon intelligence will be immensely augmented, surpassing human intelligence?

"...Take the question of whether computers can replicate the biochemical complexity of an organic brain. Kurzweil yields no ground there whatsoever. HE DOES NOT SEE ANY FUNDAMENTAL DIFFERENCE BETWEEN FLESH AND SILICON THAT WOULD PREVENT THE LATTER FROM THINKING. He defies biologists to come up with a neurological mechanism that could not be modeled or at least matched in power and flexibility by software running on a computer. He refuses to fall on his knees before the mystery of the human brain. 'Generally speaking,' he says, 'the core of a disagreement I'll have with a critic is, they'll say, Oh, Kurzweil is underestimating the complexity of reverse-engineering of the human brain or the complexity of biology. But I don't believe I'm underestimating the challenge. I THINK THEY'RE UNDERESTIMATING THE POWER OF EXPONENTIAL GROWTH.'..." [213]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 217:

For those seeking that — regardless of complexity — linking points between machines and humans, an English mathematician has a word of reflection.

Alan Turing postulates, “...A computer would deserve to be called intelligent if it could deceive a human into believing that it was human...” [100]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 218:

Has the fluid impact of change been understood by the establishment (so-called)?

“... There was a new complex future emerging ─ an extreme future of disruptions, risks, threats, and perhaps, new opportunities ─ that no one, not even our leaders, fully understood ...” [182]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 219:

What are we going to do with our customary system of belief, ethos and Weltanschauung?

Abraham Lincoln (1809 – 1865, 16th President of the U.S.) pointed out, “...The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 220:

Alvin Toffler offers some insight, “.....The FUTURE always comes too fast and in the wrong order [expected by the great majority of mindful or absent/minded ‘incumbents’]...” [17] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 221:

In a continuous dialogue about massive change, Toffler adds:

Alvin Toffler (1928 - ): “...‘Future Shock’ … the shattering stress and disorientation that we induce in individuals by subjecting them to too much change in too short a time … The dizzying disorientation brought on by premature arrival of the future ...” [17]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 222:

Must we subject ourselves to the most heterodox conventions in order to prevail?

Alexis de Tocqueville, “...Events can move from the impossible to the inevitable without ever stopping at the probable...” [181]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 223:

Albert Einstein indicates, “...If at first an idea does not sound absurd, then there is no hope for it...” [167]

“...Clouds are not spheres, mountains are no cones, coastlines are not circles, and bark is not smooth, nor does lightning travel in a straight line...” [214]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 224:

Dr. Aubrey de Grey Ph.D., a leading-edge scientist at the University of Cambridge in England, states it, “...We'll be solving problems before they arrive...” [59] Quite a future-ready declaration, Is it not?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 225:

What are the ultimate choices of us?

Juan Enriquez: “...We are the beginning to acquire … direct and deliberate control … over the evolution of all life forms … ON THE PLANET … Including ourselves....” [163]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 226:

Are we out-smarting ourselves?

Stephen M. R. Covey: “...And capabilities are particularly essential in today’s changing economy, where technology and globalization are outdating skill-sets faster than ever before. The half-life of our current knowledge and skills is much shorter that it has ever been, and suddenly someone who was very competent and even had a great track record in yesterday’s world may no longer be competent in today’s world ...” [196]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 227:

From Nation States To Networks!

John Naisbitt observes: “...For many years the mindset has been that the global economy will be dominated by huge multinational companies. And that's turned out not to be the case. In fact, we have to re-examine our vocabulary and our definition of what multinational means .... I have a company called Megatrends Ltd., and we have 57 joint ventures in 42 countries, and we have only four employees including myself. We outsource everything. Well, almost everything. So I'm a multinational company. I must be, obviously, because I'm in 42 countries. But I'm not big. I'm small .... In other words, the world multinational has a new meaning. And if we say that the global economy will be dominated by multinationals in the new sense, then there is some truth to it. But if we mean it in the old way, that these huge global companies will control everything, that couldn't be more wrong .... What I think is really important is that there's a new kind of bigness. And that's big networks, rather than big mainframes. This is the metaphor I use .... I remember in my kitchen in Telluride, Colorado and watching CNN. It was the G7 were meeting in Naples for the economic summit. And I saw the leaders of these seven great industrial nations talking to each other, it struck me that this is a bunch of mainframes talking to each other in a PC world. It's part of the whole irrelevance of the G7, and by the twenty-first century I think I will be totally out the window ─ it just doesn't make sense any more .... We no longer live in a world of big mainframes. We live in a world where the real power is in big networks. By big networks, I mean a lot of individuals networked together. And, by definition, a network doesn't have any headquarters. For a network to work, everyone has to feel that they are in the center. That's when it's really powerful .... The only huge company that I know of that's really done this is Asea Brown Boveri. If you listen to Percy Barnevick, he says: '…We grow all the time, but we also shrink all the time...' The network gets larger but the nodes get smaller...” [203]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 228:

Among other concurrent methodologies, one can see the future early on via Churchillian prescription!

Winston Churchill: “...The further backward you look, the further forward you can see...” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 229:

Reinforcing this position had been Confucius for centuries: “...If a man gives not thought about what is distant, he will find sorrow near at hand...” [103]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 230:

“...Einstein was once asked what the difference was between him and the average person. He said that if you asked the average person to find a needle in a haystack, the person would stop when he or she found a needle. He, on other hand, would tear through the entire haystack looking for all the possible needles ...” [134]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 231:

Why should we manage problems way in advance before and thoroughly they get out control?

Dwight D. Eisenhower: “...All plans fall at first contact with the enemy [competing situations, including and beginning those of and by change, as well as those unplanned for] ...” [123] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 232:

Dr. Vernon Grose, D.Sc. argues: “...It would be hard to find anyone who believes that losses occur without any cause. Yet many managers, acting as though an accident is a random stroke of fate, have to be reminded to seek and remove causes prior to a loss. Less obvious to the layman is the idea that nearly all accidental losses have a multiple causes: virtually no accident has a single cause .... Identifying causes, especially those that are subtle or unseen, requires tenacity, imagination, and a systematic method. However, since almost every accident or loss has a known precedent, you never have to start your search for causes empty-handed...” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 233:

And Dr. Grose further indicates: “...A primer on the development, application, and requirement of ‘systems thinking’ to obtain an ordered, global management perspective — a critical need if historical risk management is to be translated [in advance] from reaction into prevention of risk [many call risks “...problems...”] .... The systems approach is godlike — at least in perspective. It aims to look at any situation with OMNISCIENCE — TOTALITY OF KNOWLEDGE .... Of course, it never succeeds because of human limitations. But the goal remains. And such goal is essential if risk is to be managed effectively. Every possible risk must be considered before systematic management of risk can occur. If this seems grandiose, it isn’t meant to be. In failing to take such a lofty and all-encompassing view, managers are vulnerable to being blind-sided by an overlooked risk while believing that they have everything under control....” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 234:

Adding insights in line with the theme treated and emergency preparedness and business continuity before and after extreme hazards, there are valuable reflections by Dr. Collins.

Dr. Robert A. Collins, Ph.D. : “...Disasters are a natural and predictable part of the human condition. This includes both natural disasters and human-made disasters. In spite of this, whenever a disaster strikes, most people are unprepared. The inevitable result is the loss of life and property. It does not have to be this way .... SINCE DISASTERS ARE AN INEVITABLE PART OF LIFE, THE WISEST COURSE OF ACTION IS TO UNDERSTAND THEM, PREPARE FOR THEM, AND CAPITALIZE ON THE OPPORTUNITIES THAT THEY PRESENT. The first and most important step in disaster planning is, obviously, to have a plan. Without a specific plan, it will be very difficult, if not impossible, to implement the other steps in disaster preparation. Most organizations deal with disasters by first hoping that they don’t happen. Then when they do happen, they respond to them and try to recover from them. MOST ORGANIZATIONS DO NOT TRY TO MITIGATE THEM IN ADVANCE. THIS IS AN IRRATIONAL AND EXPENSIVE STRATEGY .... It is impossible to plan for things that you cannot imagine. Therefore, the first step in forging the resilient organization is to conduct ‘scenario planning’ .... It is necessary for the organization to be honest with itself when completing the scenario planning step in disaster preparation. THE TASK HERE IS NOT TO IMAGINE THE WORST DISASTER THAT THE ORGANIZATION THINKS THAT IT CAN HANDLE. THE TASK IS TO IMAGINE THE WORST DISASTER THAT COULD POSSIBLE STRIKE THE COMPANY, GIVEN ITS GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION AND INDIVIDUAL CIRCUMSTANCES. Lee Clarke, a disaster planning expert and professor at Rutgers University argues, ‘IT’S NOT CRAZY TO THINK ABOUT THE WORST CASES [IN ADVANCE]’ ...” [124]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 235:

An example of disruption-potential and post-‘risk management’?

“...You may remember the situation in 1982 when seven people in the U.S. died from ingesting Tylenol that had been laced with cyanide. The nation panicked. Some predicted that Johnson & Johnson would never be able to sell another product under that name. But Johnson & Johnson took responsibility for the situation. They immediately alerted consumers to stop using Tylenol until they could determine the extent of the tampering. They recalled approximately 31 million bottles of Tylenol, retailing at more than $100 million. They offered to exchange all Tylenol capsules that had already been purchased for Tylenol tablets, which cost them millions more. They established relations with law enforcement officers on every level to help search for the person who laced the medication and to help prevent further tampering. They put up a reward of $100,000 for the person who committed the crime. When they reintroduced the product back in the market, it had new triple-seal, tamper-resistant packaging. As a result of their actions, they turned what could have been a disaster into a victory in credibility and public trust ...” [196]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 236:

Can we take advantage of risk and benefit management with immense forethought and never in expensive hindsight?

“...Journalist Geoffrey Colvin (2005) argues: '…The events that do the worst damage are the one no even conceived of … The idea that a passenger jet might crash into the World Trade Center had been thought of; it was a fairly obvious possibility, especially since a plane once crashed into the Empire State Building. What no one imagined was the combination of large planes with nearly full fuel tanks plus the impact of the crashes jarring fireproofing from the girders, and how this could bring the towers down. In retrospect, it obviously could have been imagined. I’ just wasn’t'...” [124]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 237:

If we based our decision-making on intuitiveness and hunches, we will never get it right. We can just admit we are inundated with complexity, identify it, establish countermeasures against it and strategy to finally get our benefits in a sustained and rational way.

How are these speedy and somewhat dramatic times shaping and re-shaping us?

“...Journalist Amy Bernstein (2006) point out: ‘…Few issues have morphed as dramatically in the last five year as corporate resilience. That phrase once refereed to managing risks that were fairly predictable and relatively easy to insure against: fires, strikes, and economic recessions for example. But all that has changed. A string of catastrophes — beginning with the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, and continuing through the bombing of the Madrid railway and the Asian Tsunami in 2004, the blast on the London Underground in July 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in August and September, and the earthquake that devastated Pakistan in October 2005 — has rearranged our concept of disaster preparedness. It’s no longer enough for companies to devise a business continuity plan and file it away somewhere. THEY NOW HAVE TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO BOUNCE BACK FROM THE UNTHINKABLE.’...” [124]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 238:

What are the relevant considerations that we insist on ignoring beyond any irresponsibility?

“...Yossi Sheffi, Professor of Systems Engineering at MIT, conducted a three year study of resilient organizations from Toyota to UPS to the US Navy, and drew a simple conclusion: A COMPANY’S ABILITY TO RETURN TO BUSINESS DEPENDS MORE ON THE DECISIONS IT MAKES BEFORE A SHOCK HITS THAN THOSE IT MAKES DURING OR AFTER THE EVENT… According to Sheffi, the terrorist attacks of 9/11 forced him and his colleagues to see a more comprehensive view of risk. He states: ‘Before that, I thought about it mostly in financial terms — buying insurance against various business risks, buying commodity futures such as oil to hedge against price fluctuations, the use of financial derivatives, etc. In the wake of the attacks, I starred looking at all kinds of disruptions, and it became clear that there’s a lot more to consider than contingency planning or financial hedging. THERE ARE LOW-PROBABILITY/HIGH IMPACT EVENTS like terrorist attacks that may cause unplanned exists from important markets or even the demise of the unprepared business’ .... During MIT’s three year study on resilient companies and interviews with dozens of companies, found that a culture of resilience was a common element. He argues: ‘The essence of resilience is the containment of disruption and recovery from it. Culture contributes to resilience by endowing employees with a set of principles regarding the proper response when the unexpected does occur, and when the formal organization’s policy does not cover the situation at hand or is too slow to react, it suggests the course of action to take’ ...” [124]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 239:

In speaking of contingency planning, it's worth noting the ensuing.

Murphy's law states: “...If anything can go wrong, it ultimately will....” [96] Nonetheless, I insist that in many instances this “...law...” is universally used not to get “...preparedness...” in advance and in place. So planning and preparation becomes lax. Subsequently, the loss disruption ─ once crystallized ─ is congruently blamed on Murphy's law. This is rampant mediocrity.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 240:

“...After-the-fact no longer works .... Bring it back if you have any trouble with it, and I’ll fix it somehow,’ was the standard comment when you used to pick up a bicycle, automobile, food mixer, or lawn mower from the repair shop. And the repairman meant what he said. He was confident that if he had overlooked anything or made a mistake of any kind, he would get a second shot at fixing .... The ‘second shot’ is a luxury that no longer exists in many businesses. You get only one chance — after that, you’ll be talking only with attorneys, insurance agents, or bankers .... Life used to be simple. You knew your customers on a first-name basis. Your product or service was a relatively simple one — understood by both you and your customer. Your name and reputation were sufficient to cover any error or oversight .... But the world has become complex, too complex to allow such comfortable relationships. Consumer expectations are matching the complexities. Instantaneous news coverage of accidents and losses virtually precludes the private, out-of-sight settlement of risk effects that had previously allowed the after-the-fact resolution of risk to succeed. The breadth in that old idea is rapidly being squeezed out — like the inevitable tightening of a boa constrictor around its victim .... The price for public exposure of loss is high. Managers have begun to realize that risk must be examined formally and resolved beforehand rather than being settled after-the-fact. And they learn from others. It was the 1982 sinking of the offshore drilling rig Ocean Ranger that spurred EXXON top management to order a systematic evaluation of their offshore drilling risks … Even though EXXON does not own such rigs, it recognized that even conducting operations aboard them created risks that demanded before-the-fact identification, evaluation, and control....” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 241:

Prof. Hamel, along those lines by de Grey and Grose, states: “...From Nostradamus to Alvin Toffler, individuals and organizations have long been obsessed with trying to see the future. The goal is to somehow get advanced warning of ‘what will be’...” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 242:

Furthering the motions by Hamel, de Grey, my beloved father and my own self (that is, seeking to further the quest and findings about diverse perspectives on knowledge), Dr. Hauerwas has some invaluable words of wisdom about “...Universal Knowledges....” Ensuing:

Stanley Hauerwas, B.D. M.A. M.Phil and Ph.D.: “...in support of the liberal notion that the knowledges that constitute the university have no ‘use’ fail to ask what [John Henry] Newman mean by ‘universal knowledge.’ By ‘universal’ Newman did not mean that the knowledges that constitute liberal learning cannot be justified by their utility, but rather that all knowledge was interconnected because the ‘universe in its length and breadth is so intimately knit together.’ To be educated is not to be well read or to know a great deal about this or that subject. Rather, it is the only true enlargement of mind which is the power of viewing many things at once as one whole, of referring them severally to their true place in the universal system, or understanding their respective values, and determining their mutual dependence...” [95]

And Hauerwas continues:

“... Thus is that form of Universal Knowledges sets up in the individual intellect, and constitutes its perfection. Possessed of this real illumination, the mind never views any part of the extended subject-matter of Knowledge without recollecting that it is but a part, or without the associations which spring from this recollection. It makes every thing in some sort lead to every thing else; it would communicate the image of the whole to every separate portion, till that whole becomes in imagination like a spirit, everywhere pervading and penetrating its component parts, and giving them one definite meaning .... Philosophy, not theology, Newman believes to be the discipline that is distinct from all the sciences, that is, ‘in some sense’ philosophy is ‘a science of sciences.’ ...” [95] I must communicate that this wisdom is “...hyperbolically...” optimum.

Notwithstanding, said “...Universal Knowledges,...” an indeed appreciated and practicable notion is a sub-system (or only as a function of) what I have here defined as “...applied omniscience....” There is no incongruousness, but an absolute synergistic supplementary. My applied omniscience definition at « http://bit.ly/c8zAeb » I strongly believe in one KNOWLEDGE stemming from applied omniscience.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 243:

In the mean time, there is an Arab adage to share with you: “...That who foretells the truth lies even if he is telling the truth....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 244:

Sir Karl Popper, to that end, argues: “...We may become the makers of our fate when we have ceased to pose as its prophets .... Because of strictly logical reasons, it is impossible for us to predict the future course of history....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 245:

Consequences of attempting to predict the future?

John Smart: “...’The future can’t be predicted,’ is a common refrain … But … when [this perspective] is wrong, it is profoundly wrong....” [142]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 246:

And, along those same lines, Jean Cocteau (1989 – 1963) points out: “...The future doesn’t belong to anyone. There are no harbingers; there are only but debtors...” [130] [130] [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 247:

Further insight along these lines:

By Gary Hamel, Ph.D. : “...The future belongs not to those who possess a crystal ball, but those willing to challenge the biases and prejudices of the ‘establishment.’ The future belongs more to the unorthodox than it does to the prognosticators [ … and/or predictioneers ...], more to the movement than to the starry-eyed....” [87] (Leading the Revolution - ISBN-13: 978-0452283244). Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 248:

From the Institute for the Future, Paul Saffo and Roy Amara make a point regarding change:

“...I think about it as ‘orders of impact.’ First order, second order, etc. When an earthquake happens you have a whole series of waves that follow. The first order of the auto was the horseless carriage. The second order was the traffic jam. The third-order impact was the move toward the suburbs. This led in turn to the creation of huge metropolitan areas....” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 249:

To this end John Lienhard comments: “...We live in a technology-dense world .... We are terrifyingly naked without knowing elementary things about [how technologies] work...” [104] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 250:

Addressing Kurzweil, Grossman and de Grey, a clever and prominent physician makes his point. Dr. Joseph Knoll, M.D. who effected an extraordinary reflection:

“...We shall never forget that humans obviously cannot change natural laws, but by discovering their mechanisms of action they learn to make use of this knowledge. By conquering gravitation man stepped across his naturally given limit and ultimately landed on the moon....” [59]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 251:

Impossibilities rendered fully feasible?

Sir Arthur C. Clarke’s Three Laws: “...(1) When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong. (2) The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible. (3) Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic....” [166]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 252:

There is a valuable thought about the future and its arrival, attributed to Gary Hamel, “...The problem with the future is that is different [since is profound, its scientific properties are being dramatically changed in real time and all of the time]. If you are unable to think differently, the Future will always arrive as a surprise...” [28]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 253:

In addition and as it is believed to be proclaimed by Samuel Goldwyn, “...Only a fool would make predictions, especially about the future....” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 254:

Applicable womb-to-tomb, epidemiological vista will be beyond vital.

I will include a remarkable quotation by Strategos Institute Founder and London Business School Professor. Prof. Gary Hamel, Ph.D.:

“...Each revolution in art was based on a re-conception of reality. It wasn’t the canvas, the pigments, or the brushes that changed, but how the artist perceived the world. In the same sense, it’s not the tools that distinguish industry revolutionaries from hummed. rum incumbents — not the information technology they harness, not the process they use, not their facilities. Instead, is their ability to escape the stranglehold of the familiar...” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 255:

I strongly support JFK’s ensuing take as well.

President John F. Kennedy’s speech on September 12, 1962 at Race University: “...If this capsule history of our progress teaches us anything, it is that man, in his quest for knowledge and progress, is determined and cannot be deterred. The exploration of space will go ahead, whether we join in it or not, and it is one of the great adventures of all time, and no nation which expects to be the leader of other nations can expect to stay behind in the race for space .... Well, space is there, and we're going to climb it, and the moon and the planets are there, and new hopes for knowledge and peace are there. And, therefore, as we set sail we ask God's blessing on the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventure on which man has ever embarked...” [80]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 256:

In aligning the idea of understanding the nature of change and the impacts stemming from said change, former GE’s CEO Jack Welch indicated:

“...Seeing the world the way it is, not the way we hope it will be or wish it to be...” [42]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 257:

To further enlighten the present material, Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) stated: “...Jeff Immelt realizes that the world changes every day and that his job is to keep GE competitive in that changing world. But his ability to take the company where it needs to go is greatly facilitated by the fact that he has a clear understanding of where he is starting...” [42]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 258:

By Thomas Edison indicates: “...If we all did the things we are capable of doing well we would literally astound ourselves...” [44]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 259:

Otto Herman Khan (RAND Corporation's Dr. Strangelove). He veritably stated: “...I'm against fashionable thinking ... I'm against ignorance ... I am against the whole cliche of the moment ... I'm against sloppy, emotional thinking…[I am against incomplete, linear thinking.. And ..I am against inexpensive thinking....”]....” [43]. Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 260:

Salvador Dali in seconding the motion by Khan offers us a thought: “...Get real; dream the impossible....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 261:

In case, you just yet don't have it unambiguously clear, this is Valéry's take in the beginning of the last century.

(by Paul Valéry, 1932)

“...All the notions we thought solid, all the values of civilized life, all that made for stability in international relations, all that made for regularity in the economy … in a word, all that tended happily to limit the uncertainty of the morrow, all that gave nations and individuals some confidence in the morrow … all this seems badly compromised. I have consulted all augurs I could find, of every species, and I have heard only vague words, contradictory prophecies, curiously feeble assurances. Never has humanity combined so much power with so much disorder, so much anxiety with so many playthings, so much knowledge with so much uncertainty...” [56]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 262:

There is great American scientist offering cautious optimism!

Dr. Robert H. Goddard, Ph.D. : “...It is difficult to say what is impossible, for the dream of yesterday is the hope of today and the reality of tomorrow....” [117] Biography of Dr. Goddard at http://bit.ly/bRzGqm

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 263:

AN ACTUAL DIALOGUE OF DARWIN, NEWTON, KANT, GOETHE, BACON, DA VINCI, GALILEO, TESLA, BUCMINSTER FULLER, CHURCHILL AND OTHERS WITH ANDRES ? [131]

Andres: “...Charles, How does your mind envision in general? And what about you, Isaac?...”

Charles Darwin: “...My mind seems to have become a kind of machine for grinding general laws out of large collections of facts....” [131]

Isaac Newton: “...If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants....” [131]

Andres: “...How do you visualize or do you not visualize, Immanuel? Can you offer us a suggestion?...”

Immanuel Kant: “...Seek not the favor of the multitude; it is seldom got by honest and lawful means. But seek the testimony of few; and number not voices, but weigh them....” [131]

Andres: “...How does your vision and thought relate, Charles? And what about in your case Immanuel?...”

Charles Darwin: “...The highest possible stage in moral culture is when we recognize that we ought to control our thoughts....” [131]

Immanuel Kant: “...All thought must, directly or indirectly, by way of certain characters, relate ultimately to intuitions, and therefore, with us, to sensibility, because in no other way can an object be given to us. Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind....” [131]

Andres: “...Johann, in addition to the views of Kant, Darwin and Newton, How — in your view — one should see? Can you give us some hints?...”

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe: “...Every day we should hear at least one little song, read one good poem, see one exquisite picture, and, if possible, speak a few sensible words. In nature we never see anything isolated, but everything in connection with something else which is before it, beside it, under it and over it. The hardest thing to see is what is in front of your eyes....” [131]

Andres: “...Johann, How does your mind envision?...”

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe: “...All intelligent thoughts have already been thought; what is necessary is only to try to think them again....” [131]

Andres: “...Francis, What is your take about the operation of one's mind and / or perhaps a personal trait?...”

Francis Bacon: “...Of all virtues and dignities of the mind, goodness is the greatest, being the character of the Deity; and without it, man is a busy, mischievous, wretched thing....” [131]

Andres: “...How do people exercise thinking, Francis?...”

Francis Bacon: “...People usually think according to their inclinations, speak according to their learning and ingrained opinions, but generally act according to custom....” [131]

Andres: “...What truth holds intact regardless, Charles?...”

Charles Darwin: “...False facts are highly injurious to the progress of science, for they often endure long; but false views, if supported by some evidence, do little harm, for every one takes a salutary pleasure in proving their falseness....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your POV concerning science, Imamnuel?...”

Immanuel Kant: “...Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your POV concerning science, Johann?...”

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: “...He who possesses art and science has religion; he who does not possess them, needs religion. The credit of advancing science has always been due to individuals and never to the age....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your POV concerning science, Isaac?...”

Isaac Newton: “...To me there has never been a higher source of earthly honor or distinction than that connected with advances in science....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your POV concerning science, Charles?...”

Charles Darwin: “...A scientific man ought to have no wishes, no affections, — a mere heart of stone. False facts are highly injurious to the progress of science, for they often endure long; but false views, if supported by some evidence, do little harm, for every one takes a salutary pleasure in proving their falseness....” [131]

Andres: “...What topic is for one to really learn about it, Johann?...”

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: “...No one has ever learned fully to know themselves. Only by joy and sorrow does a person know anything about themselves and their destiny. They learn what to do and what to avoid....” [131]

Andres: “...In learning, What is important for one to bear in mind, Charles?...”

Charles Darwin: “...In the long history of humankind (and animal kind, too) those who learned to collaborate and improvise most effectively have prevailed....” [131]

Andres: In seeing, “...How does one make a decision, Leonardo?...”

Leonardo da Vinci: “...There are three classes of people: those who see, those who see when they are shown, those who do not see. Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than the imagination when awake?...” [131]

Andres: “...Leonardo, I have heard an appalling notion from some management mogul. This person indicates that if an individual does not get ‘mad,’ she and he won't solve a significant problem? What fosters knowledge and what precludes it?...”

Leonardo da Vinci: “...Where there is shouting, there is no true knowledge....” [131]

Andres: “...Francis, I have heard an appalling notion from some management mogul. This person indicates that if an individual does not get “...mad,...” she and he won't solve a significant problem? What fosters knowledge and what precludes it?...”

Francis Bacon: “...Anger makes dull men witty, but it keeps them poor....” [131]

Andres: “...Knowledge to be bestowed upon ourselves and others to achieve what, Francis?...”

Francis Bacon: “...For also knowledge itself is power....” [131]

Andres: “...What is philosophy good for in your view, Francis?...”

Francis Bacon: “...A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion....”

Andres: “...How valuable to you is prudence, Francis?...”

Francis Bacon: “...A prudent question is one-half of wisdom....” [131]

Andres: “...Where does opportunities com from, Francis?...”

Francis Bacon: “...A wise man will make more opportunities than he finds....” [131]

Andres: “...Where do you get knowledge from, Leonardo?...”

Leonardo da Vinci: “...All our knowledge has its origins in our perceptions....” [131]

Andres: “...Why is so important to conceive the right future, Herman?...”

Herman Kahn: “...Projecting a persuasive image of a desirable and practical future is extremely important to high morale, to dynamism, to consensus, and in general to help the wheels of society turn smoothly....” [131]

Andres: “...What is changing the most in your view and what are the “...downside...” implications of said changes, Herman?...”

Herman Kahn: “...A total nuclear freeze is counterproductive — especially now, when technology is rapidly changing and the Soviets have some important strategic advantages....” [131]

Andres: “...What have you done with your thinking capacity, Herman?...”

Herman Kahn: “...For some years I have spent my time on exactly these questions — both in thinking about ways to prevent war, and in thinking about how to fight, survive, and terminate a war, should it occur....” [131]

Andres: “...What relevance do you give — as a specific value type of thing — you give to morality and ethics, Herman?...”

Herman Kahn: “...Human and moral factors must always be considered. They must never be missing from policies and from public discussion....” [131]

Andres: “...Why must we advance science? Can you be a bit specific, Galileo? ...”

Galileo Galilei: “...By denying scientific principles, one may maintain any paradox....” [131]

Andres: “...What is mathematics to you, Albert?...”

Albert Einstein: “...Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical ideas....” [131]

Andres: “...What is imagination good for, Albert?...”

Albert Einstein: “...Imagination is everything. It is the preview of life's coming attractions. Imagination will take you everywhere....” [131]

Andres: “...What is education?...”

Albert Einstein: “...Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school....” [131]

Andres: “...How does one should live life wisely in your opinion, Albert?...”

Albert Einstein: “...Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning....” [131]

Andres: “...What are your thoughts lately?...”

Albert Einstein: “...I want to know all Gods thoughts; all the rest are just details....” [131]

Andres: “...What are the connections among every discipline of knowledge?...”

Albert Einstein: “...All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree....” [131]

Andres: “...What is science good for, Albert?...”

Albert Einstein: “...It stands to the everlasting credit of science that by acting on the human mind it has overcome man's insecurity before himself and before nature....” [131]

Andres: “...Is it learning important, Ben?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...A learned blockhead is a greater blockhead than an ignorant one....” [131]

Andres: “...What is the problem with self-made ignoramuses?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...Being ignorant is not so much a shame, as being unwilling to learn....” [131]

Andres: “...Who has taught you the most, Ben?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...Experience is a dear teacher, but fools will learn at no other....” [131]

Andres: “...How do you forge an educated mind?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn....” [131]

Andres: “...What is the opposite of Reason?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...The way to see by Faith is to shut the Eye of Reason....” [131]

Andres: “...Where will you trust your most treasured funds?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...An investment in knowledge pays the best interest....”

Andres: “...How does one succeed?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...Do not fear mistakes. You will know failure. Continue to reach out....” [131]

Andres: “...In the West wisdom seems to be a fashion while in the Far East this is a matter of great attention, is it not?...”

Benjamin Franklin: “...Wise men don't need advice. FOOLS WON'T TAKE IT....” [131]

Andres: “...What is the methodical sequence to success?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...Being busy does not always mean real work. The object of all work is production or accomplishment and to either of these ends there must be forethought, system, planning, intelligence, and honest purpose, as well as perspiration. Seeming to do is not doing....” [131]

Andres: “...How do you get to prevailing in seizing success?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...I find my greatest pleasure, and so my reward, in the work that precedes what the world calls success....” [131]

Andres: “...How important is winning?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your take about complexity?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...I know this world is ruled by infinite intelligence. Everything that surrounds us — everything that exists — proves that there are infinite laws behind it. There can be no denying this fact. It is mathematical in its precision....” [131]

Andres: “...Do you trust serendipities or do you prefer pseudo-serendipities?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...I never did anything by accident, nor did any of my inventions come by accident; they came by work....” [131]

Andres: “...How do you gauge success?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...Just because something doesn't do what you planned it to do doesn't mean it's useless....” [131]

Andres: “...What is that long-ignored flank?...”

Thomas A. Edison: “...Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work....” [131]

Andres: “...Richard, How do you like the world's technological advances?...”

R. Buckminster Fuller: “...Humanity is acquiring all the right technology for all the wrong reasons....” [131]

Andres: “...How do you capture success in your daily practice?...”

R. Buckminster Fuller: “...Most of my advances were by mistake. You uncover what is when you get rid of what isn't....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your view on conventional [‘out-of-the-box’ ‭ — so-called ‭ — ] discernment?...”

R. Buckminster Fuller: “...People should think things out fresh and not just accept conventional terms and the conventional way of doing things....” [131]

Andres: “...Richard, do you believe in becoming strategically surprised?...”

R. Buckminster Fuller: “...There is nothing in a caterpillar that tells you it's going to be a butterfly....” [131]

Andres: “...Give me a hint! How involved are you with futures study?...”

R. Buckminster Fuller: “...We are called to be architects of the future, not its victims....” [131]

Andres: “...In your own words, What is your own significance towards education?...”

R. Buckminster Fuller: “...You can never learn less, you can only learn more....” [131]

Andres: “...Nikola, Are you future-ready?...”

Nikola Tesla: “...Let the future tell the truth, and evaluate each one according to his work and accomplishments. The present is theirs; the future, for which I have really worked, is mine....” [131]

Andres: “...What is the thinking-process failing these days?...”

Nikola Tesla: “...The scientists of today think deeply instead of clearly. One must be sane to think clearly, but one can think deeply and be quite insane....” [131]

Andres: “...Having lived through so much history, Has life been a struggle for you?...”

Winston Churchill: “...A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty....” [131]

Andres: “...How does a manager prevail?...”

Winston Churchill: “...Battles are won by slaughter and maneuver. The greater the general, the more he contributes in maneuver, the less he demands in slaughter....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your take on the quality-assurance movement?...”

Winston Churchill: “...Great and good are seldom the same man....” [131]

Andres: “...What is your mind-expansion pathway?...”

Winston Churchill: “...I am always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught....” [131]

Andres: “...Can there be anti-leadership? Offer an instance?...”

Winston Churchill: “...If Hitler invaded hell I would make at least a favorable reference to the devil in the House of Commons....” [131]

Andres: “...How supportive of the 'PRESENT' are you?...”

Winston Churchill: “...If we open a quarrel between past and present, we shall find that we have lost the future....” [131]

Forewarning: The answers by the dialogue parties with the undersigned are fully accurate and supported by the facts. Verify, to trust, at www.brainyquote.com

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 264:

Actionable knowledge creation and utilization, Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) points out some interesting reflections too often ignored by many private, public, NGO, supranational, and even academia incumbents:

“...The leadership job of the twenty-first century is to enhance brainpower of an organization by having leaders at all levels engaged in Virtuous Teaching Cycles. The case has been made that we now live in a knowledge era where the value of intellectual capital has supplemental physical assets. In this world, leaders must make everyone smarter while simultaneously aligning the energy and commitment of the people in their organizations … Thomas Stewart, a Fortune Editor and a leading thinker in the field, outlined the foundations for them knowledge economy with powerful simplicity in his most recent book, The Wealth of Knowledge: ‘The knowledge economy stands on three pillars. The first: Knowledge has become what we buy, sell, and do. It is the most important factor of production. The second pillar is a mate, a corollary to the first: Knowledge assets — that is, intellectual capital — have become more important to companies than financial and physical assets. The third pillar is this: To prosper in this new economy and exploit these newly vital assets, we need new vocabularies, new management techniques, new technologies, and new strategies. On three pillars rest all the new economy’s laws and its profits’...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 265:

Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) supplements:

“...Stewart’s ranking reflects a massive movement underway to actually measure intellectual capital … The concept is correct and we put Stewart’s work right at the front … to reinforce the importance for companies to continue defining, measuring and improving ways of generating new intellectual capital … Teaching Organizations are the needed response to today’s emphasis on knowledge creation. Today, intellectual assets trump physical assets in nearly every industry....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 266:

Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) asserts:

“...Despite the boom and bust of the recent dot-bomb era, there is no question that we are in the early stages of an era in which technology and biotechnology will have inescapable consequences for how businesses are run and organized. The practices, systems, policies and mind-sets that prevailed in the old industrial economy will not do the job. The foregone conclusion of the late 1990s that the old industrial behemoths would be agile start-ups is equally wrong for the times....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 267:

And he also indicates:

“...Rather, we now know that the winners of the future will adapt and innovate to exploit emerging technological and social changes. They will be big, fast, and smart. The winners will create value by having a workforce that is more aligned, energized and smarter than their competitors. They will leverage size and act with speed across internal and external organizational boundaries....” [42]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 268

A fast-paced world as of 1960?

“...As of 1960, computer chips have been built upon lithography, screen-printing that has allowed us to imprint forms as small as 100 nanometers (a nanometer is one billionth of a meter). One-hundredth of a cell. One-thousandth of a human hair. One-ten millionth the diameter of an elusive celluloid...” [194]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 269

I believe in simplicity stemming from a profound understanding of complexity only!

Stephen Jay Gould ( http://tiny.cc/6pngc ): “...Once you build a complex machine, it can perform so many unanticipated tasks. Build a computer ‘for’ processing checks at the plant, and it can also … whip anyone’s ass (or at least then them perpetually) in tic-tac-toe....” [187]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 270

“...We’ll infect you with the same orthodoxies we’ve infected everyone else in your industry...” [64]

Gregory S. Paul and Earl Cox: “...The power and complexity of computers are growing exponentially. Computers are becoming more like brains. Sometime during the next century, we will assert in the fashion of our made-up Future Flight authors that cyberdevices will become conscious and eventually will match the power of the human mind. The power of these cyberminds will extend beyond human levels in ways we cannot even imagine. These cyberbeings will proliferate in vast numbers. They will design and build a robotic supercivilization destined for outer space … The new cyberbeings will ‘mount up’ in polymorphic enclosures, intricately designed bodies able to assume any multisensory form. Their minds will be as emotional and intuitive as ours. They will be immortal. And they will be us, if we choose … We certainly will not be able to control the smart robot the way we control the car. Robots will have their own agendas and may have no use for mortals. Do not despair. It is probable that humans may be able to transfer their minds into the new cybersystems and join the cybercivilization. Not for the elite alone, anymore wishing to go robotic will be able to do so as cybercivilization spreads out into the universe. Intelligent cybertechnologies will become as cheap as small computers are today. Eventually, cybercivilization may adjust the structure of the universe itself when galaxies are networked … Do theologians have it all wrong? Whether God made humankind or not, we could create for ourselves those we could call gods. And, as it is now, it will be our willed choice to be with them or not. Scientists who understand the scale of geologic time agree; eventually, it will become as if mankind never existed. Our belief is that in some way, after we are gone forever, we will still be able to remember what, and who, we once were....” [169]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 271

DAKOTA TRIBAL WISDOM AND ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGIES

“...Dakota tribal wisdom says that when you discover you’re on a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount. Of course, there are other strategies. You can change riders. You can get a committee to study the dead horse. You can benchmark how other companies ride dead horses. You can declare that it’s cheaper to feed a dead horse. You can harness several dead horses together. But after you’ve tried all these things, you’re still going to have to dismount...” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 272

“...Government policies are influential in the macroscopic risks that threaten our lives. As a society has been transferred from simple agrarianism to a complex technologically-driven living standard, competing special interests force the government to make compromises that inevitably create risks — even the risk of war....” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 273

“...The law is recognizing the trend toward complexity of life and the inability of the average person to recognize and overcome risks associated with it … Whereas our forefathers could knowingly inspect the horseshoes a blacksmith nailed on their horses’ hoofs, the average person today cannot knowledgeably inspect a microwave oven or a car’s automatic transmission....” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 274

“...A primary theme in Alvin Toffler’s best selling book Future Shock is that society’s rate of change is increasing. Everything around us ─ including ourselves ─ is rapidly changing. Nothing is stable, permanent, constant, or fixed. Neither is risk. It is an indigenous element in the volatility of life. If anything, risk expands at a greater rate than the societal rate of change ─ due to its roots in uncertainty and ignorance of consequences, which multiply during mercurial instability....” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 275

Napoleon wrote to his general the ensuing:

“...Your letter tells me nothing. You will however have to be able to interrogate in order to know the names of the regiments and the commanding general and a hundred things, all very important — the morale of the troops, the way in which they are fed, the strength of the different units, and what is known from conservations with the colonels and officers of the corps .... I expected several pages and I get only two lines. Redeem all that by writing me in great detail....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 276

Attributed to Robert Kennedy. “...The future is not a privilege but a perpetual conquest...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 277

BONAPARTE’S PROPHECIES ON HURRICANE KATRINA’, SANDY'S AND GULF OF MEXICO’S SINCE (DATED) THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

On geology Napoleon generally reflects:

“...It is very important … to have good maps of all the country between the Adige, the Po, and the Adda … which will probably be the theater of new wars on the same scale as the large map of Italy. It is necessary to have all reconnaissances made at the Topographical Bureau of War in order that we could, if necessary, send the generals all suitable instructions. Then, from the commencement of war, they would know the defensive campaign field-works that will have to be prepared in the various positions in case of unfortunate developments .... I believe that the topographical engineers work, but I am not sure that they work according to good fundamental principles. We have them produce registers of the survey of lands and not military maps, which means that in twenty years, and I don’t know how many engineers and how much money, to map only a portion of the departments of Rhine and Moselle and Mont-Tonnerre, which are truly important. To make twenty years to finish maps and plans is to work too much posterity .... How many circumstances could occur over the next twenty years that we would regret? If one of them had been on the scale of a Cassini map we could already have had all of the Rhine frontier. How many circumstances could occur over the next twenty years where we will regret them? ...” [113]

And Bonaparte adds:

“...What events can occur, even for this accumulation of paper, before we can reap any advantage from all this work? I don’t know why war is waged with this type of map … The fact is, I have not had, on my visit to the Rhine, any map where I could gain knowledge of the country. We have to draw maps of Mont-Blanc … and the Piedmont the same progress that we followed for the departments of the Rhine, nothing will be finished in our lifetime .... Engineers are too much masters of what they wish to do. I have not asked for anything other than the completion of the Cassini map. Rest assured that the operations are not directed on projects that are too vast. Experience proves that the greatest defect in general administration is to want to do too much: that results in not having what is needed … Order them especially to mark clearly the nature of the different roads, in order to distinguish those which are practicable or impracticable for artillery. If all the debouches of the Black Mountains are accurately located, this map will be one of the most essential that we could have for....” [113]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 278

STRATEGOS INSTITUTE’S FOUNDER AND LONDON BUSINESS SCHOOL’S PROFESSOR ON THE FUTURE AND THE DERIVED ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGY FRAMEWORK

By Gary Hamel, Ph.D. : “...We believe that the goal is not to predict the future, but to imagine a future made possible by changes in technology, life style, work style, regulation, global geopolitics, and the like. And there are as many viable futures as there as imaginative firms that can understand deeply the dynamics at work right now which hold opportunities to become the author of the new. For the future is not what will happen; the future is what is happening. The present and the future don’t about each other, neatly divided between the five-year plan and the great unknown beyond. Rather they are intertwined. Every company is in the process of becoming — of becoming an anachronism irrelevant to the future, or of becoming the harbinger of the future. The long-term is not something that happens someday; it is what every company is building or forfeiting .... Only those who can imagine and preemptively create the future will be around to enjoy it … Creating a compelling view of tomorrow’s opportunities and moving preemptively to secure the future are tasks for neither dilettantes nor the merely intellectual curious … Other companies, the laggards, were more interested in protecting the past than in creating the future … We believe, and will argue strongly, that a company must not only get to the future first, it must get there for less .... And re-engineering charge is simply the penalty that a company must pay for not having anticipated the future .... If senior executives don’t have reasonably detailed answers to the ‘future’ set of questions, and if the answers they do have are not substantially different from the ‘today’ answers, there is little chance their companies will remain market leaders .... For much of the 1980s, IBM had been driving toward the future while looking out the rear-view mirror .... Too often, profound thinking about the future and how to shape it occurs only when present success has been substantially eroded .... Creating the future is more challenging than playing catch up, in that you have to create your own road map .... The goal is not simply to benchmark a competitor’s products and processes and imitate its methods, but to develop an independent point of view about tomorrow’s opportunities and how to exploit them. Pathbreaking is a lot more rewarding than benchmarking. One doesn’t get to the future first by letting someone else blaze the trail .... Passengers will get to the future, but their fate will not be in their own hands. Theirs profits from the future will be modest at best. Those who drive industry revolution — companies that have a clear, permeated view of where they want tom take their industry and are capable of orchestrating resources inside and outside the company to get there first — will be handsomely rewarded… The future is not an extrapolation of the past. New industrial structures will supersede old industrial structures .... Opportunities that at first blush seem evolutionary will prove to be revolutionary .... A commitment substantial enough to beget the perseverance required to create the future must be based on something more than a hunch .... But to create the future, a company must first be able to forget some of its past … ‘The future was predictable, but hardly anyone predicted it’ ...” [87]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 279

Sir Francis Bacon: “... He that will not apply new remedies must expect new evils, for time is the greatest innovator ...” [2]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 280

Understanding the future?

“... Past or future, was a succession of violent breaks or waves, with no base at all....” [135]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 281

How to prevail?

James Thomson (1700 - 1749) ─ a Scots poet and playwright ─ argues: “...Great trials seem to be a necessary preparation for great duties ...” [137]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 282

Spiritual author and leadership?

John C. Maxwell (born 1947) ─ an evangelical Christian author, speaker, and pastor who has written more than 50 books ─ stated: “...A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 283

What do humans wish to do with their life and universe?

Simon Conway Morris, Ph.D, verbalizes: “...Barring a daring technology in the future, human civilization will be hard-pressed to destroy or deflect incoming bolides [meteoric fireballs] and so avoid impact-driven catastrophes .... enmeshed in medieval cruelty, unwilling to face the boundlessly happy future; a future that, strange to say, is always just around the corner .... Western culture's penchant for regarding science and technology as the guarantors of indefinite progress toward some hazy but glorious future paradise ...” [118]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 284

In 1990 Brad Leithauser, New Yorker made a lucid comment pertaining to the rate of change at that time: “...It reminds us that, in our accelerating, headlong era, the future presses so close upon us that those who ignore it inhabit not the present but the past ...” [106]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 285

How really empowered and dis-empowered are we?

Stewart Brand (1968): “... ...We are as gods and might as well get good at it ...” [104]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 286

Forty years without public education reforms in the West and the prevalent sequel going unpaid until when?

Carl Sagan: “...We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows about science and technology ...” [104]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 287

Prof. Gary Hamel, Ph.D. : “...Denial is tragic. Delay is deadly ...” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 288

What can knowledge do for progress and modernity?

Edward Teller: “...The science of today is the technology of tomorrow ...” [83]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 289

Are you emotionally stable before the future?

Marcus Aurelius Antoninus: “...Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present ...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 290

Edward Teller: “...Two paradoxes are better than one; they may even suggest a solution ...” [93]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 291

Patrick Dixon: “...Take hold of the future or the future will take hold of you — be futurewise ...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 292

GBN’s CEO Eamonn Nelly: “...We have globalized the economy and culture, but we have not yet globalized our sense of ourselves ...” [89]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 293

Dr. Bernie Siegel, M.D. : “...Hope is a memory of the future ...” [59]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 294

In search of those that are instituting a search?

T. S. Elliot: “...We must never cease from exploring. At the end of all of our exploring will be to arrive at where we began and know the place for the first time ...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 295

CEO Emeritus of Visa International, Dee Hock: “...The problem is never how to get new innovative thoughts into your mind, but how to get old ones out ...” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 296

Do we respect time and its passage solemnly?

William Shakespeare (Macbeth): “...To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, creeps in this petty pace from day to day, to the last syllable of recorded time; and all our yesterdays have lighted fools the way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more; it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing ...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 297

What can we do about time passage?

W. E. Gladstone — British Prime Minister — (1809 — 1898): “...You cannot fight against the future...” [17]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 298

Future and the genius?

Ernest Dimnet: “...Too often we forget that genius, too, depends upon the data within its reach, that even Archimedes could not have devised Edison's inventions....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 299

Future-liable if you don’t pay attention?

John Galsworthy: “...If you don't think about the future, you cannot have one....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 300

Malcolm X: ...”...The future belongs to those who prepare for it today...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 301

Either or what?

Anthony J. D'Angelo: “...Run to meet the future or it's going to run you down...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 302

How do we sign up by phenomenal lots of tons of smart work?

Leonard I. Sweet: “...The future is not something we enter. The future is something we create...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 303

Is too much history studying dangerous?

Michael Cibenko: “...One problem with gazing too frequently into the past is that we may turn around to find the future has run out on us....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 304

Perpetual learning for Afterlife?

John Wayne: “...Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we've learned something from yesterday....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 305

In Shock, Awe and Bewilderment for not Understanding?

Alvin Toffler: “...Man has a limited biological capacity for change. When this capacity is overwhelmed, the capacity is in future shock....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 306

Do people have an innate “...love affair...” with speed?

Henry Ford: “...If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 307

Andrew Hiles argues about the “...future...” (2007):

“...In many senses the future will be more of the same. There will still be cross-cultural issues to deal with, different political systems, currency problems, different calendar systems, different values, completely different social structures, etc., both within Asia and between Asia and the other trading blocs. Fires will still occur, petty crime will still go on, economics will boom and dust, corruption will stay, illegal economic activities will continue, workplace problems will not go away ─ and so on. The basic ‘stuff’ of business and BCP [Business Continuity Planning] will continue to provide the challenges that all organizations and businesses face. BUT THERE WILL BE NEW OR ESCALATED CHALLENGES THAT HAVE TO BE FACED...” [135]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 308

Recalling not to fail into what?

George Santayana: “...Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it....” [99]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 309

The larger historic perspective is good for which purpose?

Unknown author: “...Those who stare at the past have their backs turned to the future...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 310

Grave implications of contrarians to fostering change?

Max Planck: “...An important scientific innovation rarely makes its way by gradually winning over and converting its opponents: What does happen is that the opponents gradually die out....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 311

Who gets the practical and useful merit?

Thomas Edison: “...I have more respect for the fellow with a single idea who gets there than for the fellow with a thousand ideas who does nothing....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 312

Learning from the past in reversal?

Dillon Wardian: “...Those who know their past are tempted to repeat it but on the winning side....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 313

Buying your membership to the future?

Mehmet Ildan: “...Future is an unknown country which requires tough visas for anyone to enter. Not all of us will get the chance to visit it....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 314

How does one discipline the mind?

Honoré de Balzac: “...The mind is enabled by rigid deduction to link it with the past; and to man, the past is singularly like the future; tell him what has been, and you seldom fail to show him what will be....” [82]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 315

Is it about inspiration, is it about knowledge or is it about both jointly?

To this end Dr. Bernie Siegel, M.D. : “...I’m always saying that knowledge isn’t power if you don’t have inspiration....” [59]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 316

How can one unleash the energies of creation?

The Yoga Sutras of Pantajali: “...When you are inspired by some great purpose, some extraordinary project, all your thoughts break their bounds. Your mind transcends limitations, your consciousness expands in ever direction, and you find yourself in a new, great and wonderful world....” [153]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 317

What can we do instead of what can we stomach and mind?

Dandridge M. Cole: “...We cannot predict the future, but we can invent it....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 318

How does one connect today with the future?

“...My Colleagues at the Long Foundation have helped me see the surprising connections between today and the deep future....” [78]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 319

The Chairman and CEO of the Juran Institute, A. Blantow Godfrey, in 1995 indicated to this end:

“...What we know today is far greater than what we knew a few years ago....” [91]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 320

What kind of a keel does a vessel need to explore the unexplored with the unthinkable thinking perspective?

“...At the beginning of this book I used river rafting as an analogy for the future. But perhaps sailing is a better metaphor....” [78]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 321

How early your punctuality must be?

M.El Banna: “...The only way you can see the future is if you're ahead of your own time....” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 322

Are we lacking what type of understanding?

Unknown thinker, “...We are walking toward the edge of a cliff—blindfolded … Our ability to understand the potential for future abrupt changes in climate is limited by our lack of understanding of the processes that control them....” [78]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 323

Europe has a vested interest in retrospection while California's vested interest is in prospection – By Andres

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 324

Where is our Nordic domicile?

Jean-Marie Guyau: “...The future is not what is coming at us, but what we are headed for...” [96]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 325

Count Lev Nikolaevich Tolstoi (1828 — 1910): “...I am convinced that the history of so-called scientific work in our famous centuries of European civilization will, in a couple of hundred years, represent an inexhaustible source of laughter and sorrow for future generations. The learned men of the small western part of our European continent lived for several centuries under the illusion that the eternal blessed life was the West’s future. They were interested in the problem of when and where this blessed life would come. But they never thought of how they were going to make their life better...” [69]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 326

A perspective that might prove helpful somewhat now:

Horace Mann (1796 — 1859) — American educationist: “...Lost, yesterday, somewhere between Sunrise and Sunset, two golden hours, each set with sixty diamond minutes. No reward is offered, for they are gone forever....” [2]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 327

Success comes along with tons and tons of smart and smarter work!

Gifford Pinchot: “...The vast possibilities of our great future will become realities only if we make ourselves responsible for that future....” [93]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 328

When evolution gets radicalized in applied science, a so-called breakthrough takes place. Hence, Einstein makes the case now.

Albert Einstein: “...It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has exceeded our humanity … We shall require a substantially new manner of thinking if mankind is to survive....” [4]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 329

In understanding at least the complexities embedded in the Universe, there is an Englishman with a great perspective. His quote ensues:

G.K. Chesterton (1874 — 1936), Essayist, Novelist, and Poet: “...The real trouble with this world of ours is not that it is an unreasonable world, nor that it is a reasonable one. The commonest kind of trouble is that it is nearly reasonable, but not quite. Life is not an illogicality; yet is a trap for logicians. It looks just a little more mathematical and regular than it is; its exactitude is obvious, but its inexactitude is hidden, its wildness lies in wait....” At http://bit.ly/1rdbP3t

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 330

What are intelligence and the brain’ and genome’s projected mind good for?

R. W. Young: “...Intelligence is that faculty of mind by which order is perceived in a situation previously considered disordered....” [78]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 331

In one instance, Dr. Albert Einstein points out: “...The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them....” [153] [60] In supporting this motion further, Dr. Aubrey de Grey establishes: “...To solve a very complicated problem, you generally need a fairly complicated solution [in advance]....” [59]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 332

Dr. Bertrand Russell will be gravely forewarning them of his famous sentence: “...I know of more people who'd rather die than think...”

Regarding people into imprudence, ignorance and not making reasonable decisions, Where can we get additional underpinnings?

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 333

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (30 March 1746 — 16 April 1828): “...The sleep of reason produces monsters....” [98]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 334

Does age indeed become a liability in showing the futuristic lights of modernity and TRUE justice?

Mae Wets: “...You’re never too old to become younger...” [78]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 335

Technological platform termed the Internet. Look at the following take by Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572):

“...We have made the case throughout this book, and most people agree, that in the new ‘knowledge economy’ the key to winning is maximizing human capital. Ideas and knowledge have replaced physical goods as the most valued commodities in the global marketplace. Consequently, brains, energy and talent — human capital — are the primary source of value creation. But while many people and organizations grasp the concept, few have figured out how to really utilize the talents and knowledge of everyone in the company, especially the younger members of the company....” [42]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 336

From mysticism to science, the future and an interesting quotation.

Rosario M. Levins: “...Mythical thought is not pre-scientific; rather it anticipates the future state of being a science in that its past movement and its present direction are always in the same sense....” At http://bit.ly/1gK1Md3

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 337

The quotation on analytics, science and future. Ensuing:

Charles Babbage (1792 — 1871): “...The whole of the developments and operations of analysis are now capable of being executed by machinery … As soon as an Analytical Engine exists, it will necessary guide the future course of science....” [69]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 338

Stuart A. Copans: “...Study the past if you would divine the future...” [69]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 339

The quotation abut foretelling: Unknown: “...Declare the past, diagnose the present, [and] foretell the future....” [69] Brackets are mine.

By unknown author: “...The future belongs to science and to those who make friends with science...” [69]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 340

The Prometheus-Bound quotation.

Aeschylus (453 BC):

“...Prometheus: My mother …
foretold me, that not brute strength
Not violence, but cunning must give victory
To the rulers of the future....” [69]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 341

Elliot on the present and the past.

T. S. Elliot (1888 — 1965):

“...Time present and time past
Are both perhaps present in time future,
And time future contained in time past....” [70]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 342

The past, the future and the interlude that connects both.

Eugene O’Neill (1888 — 1953): “...The only living life is in the past and future … the present is an interlude … strange interlude in which we call on past and future to bear witness we are living....” [70]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 343

Bismarck and his lack of faith on the future.

A. J. P. Taylor (1906 — 1990): “...Bismarck was a political genius of the highest rank, but he lacked one essential quality of the constructive statesman: he had no faith in the future...” [70]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 344

God, the nineteenth and twenty centuries, as well as the future.

Max Frisch (1911 — 1991): “...In the nineteenth century the problem was that God is dead; in the twentieth century the problem is that man is dead. In the nineteenth century inhumanity meant cruelty; in the twentieth century it means schizoid self-alienation. The danger of the future is that men may become robots...” [70]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 345

Who does the future belong to?

Canadian Premier Pierre Trudeau (1919 — 2000): “...The twentieth century really belongs to those who will build it. The future can be promised to no one...” [70]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 346

Foreseeing the Future out of the Fossilized Past?

Edmund Burke (1729 – 1797, an Irish statesman, author, orator, political theorist, and philosopher): “...You can never plan the future by the past...” [70]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 347

In speaking of change and social systems’ reactions, it is wise to listen to Ralph Waldo Emerson: “...There are always two parties — the party of the past and the party of the future, the establishment and the movement....” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 348

As per the Oxford Dictionary, The Establishment refers to:

“...social group exercising authority or influence, and generally seeking to resist change...” [65]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 349

Theodore Roosevelt: “...All the resources we need are in the mind....” [7]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 350

A take regarding time progression and retrogression, Sir James Jeans establishes:

Sir James Jeans — English Astronomer, physicist, and mathematician — (1877 — 1946) :

“...Taking a very gloomy view of the future of the human race, let us suppose that it can only expect to survive for two thousand million years longer, a period about equal to the past age of the earth. Then, regarded as a being destined to live for three score-years and then humanity, although it has been born in a house seventy years old, is itself three days old....” [17]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 351

Dr. Malcolm Knowles Ph.D. addresses ignoramuses (also known as simpletons into outright fallacy) of supine ignorance:

“...The greatest danger for the survival of the present civilization is neither atomic war, nor environmental pollution, nor the exploitation of natural resources, and nor present crises. The underlying cause to all of the above is the acceleration of man’s obsolescence … The only hope seems to be an electroshock program to re-instill to the present adults the competencies required to function adequately under a mode of perpetual change. This is a profound need — the immeasurable challenge — that is presented by the modern society to adult education....” At http://bit.ly/1lcGtsH

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 352

The Disraeli’s wise take:

Benjamin Disraeli — British Prime Minister — (1804 — 1881): “...Conservatism discards Prescription, shrinks from Principle, disavows Progress; having rejected all respect for antiquity, it offers no redress for the present, and makes no preparation for the future...” [17]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 353

On education and to this end, Dr. Skinner made an important point.

Dr. Burrhus Frederic Skinner Ph.D. , “...Education is what survives when what has been learned has been forgotten....” [9]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 354

Is there a path to prevailing?

Ralph Waldo Emerson: “...That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do; not that the nature of the thing itself is changed, but that our power to do is increased....” [156]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 355

What is the inner-workings of time as per Orwell? Ensuing:

George Orwell (1903 — 1950): “...Who controls the future; who controls the present controls the past … If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face — forever...” [17]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 356

How can we state the bond between the future and past:

Eugene O’Neill (1888 — 1953): “...The only living life is in the past and future … the present is an interlude … strange interlude in which we call on past and future to bear witness we are living....” [17]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 357

Was Thomas Jefferson America’s first futurist? He proclaimed:

Thomas Jefferson: “...I am captivated more by dreams of the future than by history of the past....” [11]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 358

Bernard d'Espagnat: “...Even if the Universe is a little myopic is true that, more than others, MEN OF SCIENCE ARE ITS EYES....” [16]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 359

How do you operate the sensors of the sight?

Mark Twain: “...You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus....” [172]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 360

Drucker was blamed often of self-praising himself about his capability of foretelling the future. This is his take on it:

Peter Drucker: “...Things that have already happened but whose consequences have not been realized [because they were not imagined, considered, scrutinized or envisioned by disciplined foresight and far-sight extending and expanding both sides of the human brain] … Don’t confuse movement with progress....” [17] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 361

Reinforcing the motion by Dr. Watson, Edmund Burke (1729 — 1797) argues “...Education is the cheap defense of nations....” [152]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 362

Arthur C. Clarke: “...We have to abandon the idea that schooling is something restricted to youth. How can it be, in a world where half the things a man knows at 20 are no longer true at 40 — and half of the things he knows at 40 hadn’t been discovered when he was 20?...” [19]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 363

How do freedom, security, safety, reliability, reason coalesce and intertwine?

Sir Karl Popper argued: “...We must plan for freedom, and not only for security [and safety and reliability], if for no other reason than that only [exceedingly educated] freedom can make security secure [and safety safe and reliability reliable]...” [51] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 364

Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) made a relevant contribution to understanding the nature of swirling changes. I quote some of his excerpts:

“...Speed and constant motion are the hallmark characteristics of life in the twenty-first century. The driving / enabling force behind them is the technology that allows almost instant access to information, and with each advance in technology the concept of ‘fast’ is only going to get faster...”

And Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) added:

“...This access comes not only in the form of the ability to move data around the world in nanosecond (one billionth,10— 9, of a second), but also in the ability to sift through and manipulate it. Patterns and trends that were impossible to see in the days when information [based on throughput-ed numerical and narrative data] was housed in mainframe computers that required IT professionals to access, are now readily visible to anyone with a PC and a hookup who cares to apply a few screens...”

Subsequently, he continues:

“...Moreover, as technology shrinks the cycle between an action, a reaction and a re-reaction, it becomes possible for people who might otherwise never be in direct contact to engage in a nearly constant flow of dialogue. The result is not only that technicians in Bangalore, India, and Waukesha, Wisconsin, can seamlessly work on the same project, passing it off as the day ends in one hemisphere and begins in the other, but also that a newly hired consultant at EDS can have a meaningful dialogue via videos and e-mails with CEO Dick Brown about what he sees in his territory....”

And Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) observes:

“...Meanwhile, markets for goods and services and the capital markets change directions with astounding speed. Consumer trends [because of the multitude of driving forces that propels said forces] are in a state of constant flux as a flood of new products [and services] appears every day to supplant older ones that often have been around only a few months themselves....” Brackets are mine.

And he carries on:

“...Market expansions morph into contractions seemingly overnight. It isn’t that the cycles are getting closer together. The economic expansion of the 1990s was one of the longest in U.S. history. Rather, it is the momentum when they turn that has accelerated. On March 13, 2000, the NASDAQ composite index peak at 5132. By April 14, it slumped into 3265, a loss of nearly 40% in one month. In such a volatile environment, the ability to grow, shrink and redeploy assets quickly and intelligently is a critical competence for survival...”

And Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) asserts:

“...What has happened so far is just a preview. We have only scratched the surface in using the capabilities of the current technology, not to mention the new technologies and capabilities that are coming on stream every day...”

Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) points out as well:

“...The earliest uses of most new technologies are at making old processes work better. Once computers came out of the science labs, their first mainstream uses were for such things as automating accounting and inventory controls. These applications were valuable in that they got the bills out faster and let a company make better purchasing and scheduling decisions. But once you consider the activities required for entry and retrieval, some weren’t much more effective in terms of cost or time consumption than doing things the old way....”

In understanding scales and accurate senses of proportions and depth, Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) asserted in 2004:

“...The GDP of the developed world — the United States, European Community and Japan with a total population of about 750 million — is more than $23 trillion. The rest of the world, including China with 1.2 billion people and India with about 1.2 billion people and India with about 1 billion people, lives on less than $3 trillion in GDP. Take the world’s five largest companies, GE, Exxon/Mobil, Microsoft, Pfizer and Wal-Mart — their market capitalization is bigger than the GDP of India...”

As Dr. Noel Tichy, PhD. (ISBN-13: 978-0066620572) concluded making his case. [42]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 365

To further set the stage for this material’s comprehension, the textbook “...Einstein in the Boardroom...” by Suzanne S. Harrison and Patrick H. Sullivan Sr. may offer some lucid ideas on the “...current...” state of affairs when they claim:

“...Humans have been adding to their total knowledge steadily over the centuries, and the amount of knowledge we create is multiplying at an incredible rate. BEGINNING WITH THE AMOUNT OF KNOWLEDGE IN THE KNOWN WORLD AT THE TIME OF CHRIST, STUDIES HAVE ESTIMATED THAT THE FIRST DOUBLING OF THAT KNOWLEDGE TOOK PLACE ABOUT 1700 A.D. THE SECOND DOUBLING OCCURRED AROUND THE YEAR 1900. IT IS ESTIMATED TODAY THAT THE WORLD'S KNOWLEDGE BASE WILL DOUBLE AGAIN BY 2010 AND AGAIN AFTER THAT BY 2013...” [37]

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In a treatise concerning the “...Principles of Human Knowledge,...” George Berkeley (1865 – 1753) sustains,

“...We have first raised a dust [science, technology and progress] and then complain [because our most determined decision of not taking our own education and acculturation further] we cannot see [understand the world upon which we dare to stand upon]...” [130] Brackets are mine.

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The American Heritage Dictionary’s Introduction (fourth edition, 2000) by Joseph P. Pickett, Executive Director, literally indicates, to further illustrate the reader, [54]:

“...This Fourth Edition of The American Heritage Dictionary combines the best of traditional making with key innovations that afford new ways of looking at our language… This edition has nearly 10,000 new words and senses that reflect the rapid pace of change in the English language today. Technological innovations in computing and communications along with advances in the sciences have been especially rich sources of development in the lexicon (for example, bit map, domain name, and raster in computing; dark matter, photonics, and yoctosecond in science). Medicine and medical research continue to produce an astonishing array of new terms for chemicals and substances (endostatin, leptin, transfatty acid), for disorders and infectious agents (Asperger’s syndrome, erectile dysfunction, hantavirus), for treatment (cocktail, molecular knife, xenotransplant), and for a variety of creations and discoveries (designer gene, enteric nervous system, microsleep) .... In addition, continuing social change in postindustrial society has given rise to expressions that describe new business practices (buyback, microcredit, reverse mortgage), a changing workplace (face time, job-share, mommy track), and evolving political positions and governmental policies (family leave, term limit, workfare). New sports terms have arisen (clap skate, five hole, skyboard), as have words for new educational practices (charter school, distance learning, homeschool). The names of foods from other cultures continue to be adopted (baba gannouj, garam masala, quesadilla). A host of new cultural developments has produced a host of new compound cords (assisted living, poetry slam, shock jock). And English speakers continue to be an exuberance force in creative coinage (bloviate, newbie, wannabe) .... To ensure accuracy in the coverage of our rapidly changing vocabulary, we have worked closely with distinguished consultants in a wide variety of specialized fields, including anthropology, astronomy, genetics, immunology, philosophy, and physics, to name but a few. We have also gone to great lengths to make our biological and geographic entries as timely as possible. Many new biographical entries have been added, especially in the areas of sports, music, film-making, and literature. To the geographic entries we have added new country names, such as Myanmar and the Republic of Congo, and newly prominent places such as Kosovo ...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 368

Learning about the futures?

Virginia Postrel, “...the future is alive. Like the present, the future is not a single, uniform state but an ongoing process that reflects the plenitude of human life. There is in fact no single future; ‘the’ future encompasses the many microfutures of individuals and their associations. It includes all the things we learn about ourselves and the world, all the incremental improvements we discover, all our new ideas, and all the new ways we express and recombine them. As a system, the future is natural, out of anyone’s control, though is driven by the artificial: by individual attempts … This open-ended future can’t be contained in the vision of a single person or organization. And … it is something we can never be caught up with .... HOW WE FEEL ABOUT THE EVOLVING FUTURE TELLS US WHO WE ARE AS INDIVIDUALS AND AS A CIVILIZATION: DO WE SEARCH FOR STASIS ─A REGULATED, ENGINEERED WORLD? OR DO WE EMBRACE DYNAMISM─A WORLD OF CONSTANT CREATION, DISCOVERY, AND COMPETITION? DO WE VALUE STABILITY AND CONTROL, OR EVOLUTION AND LEARNING? … OR DO WE SEE TECHNOLOGY AS AN EXPRESSION OF HUMAN CREATIVITY AND THE FUTURE AS INVITING? DO WE THINK THAT PROGRESS REQUIRES A CENTRAL BLUEPRINT, OR DO WE SEE IT AS A DECENTRALIZED, EVOLUTIONARY PROCESS? DO WE CONSIDER MISTAKES PERMANENT DISASTERS, OR THE CORRECTABLE BY-PRODUCTS OF EXPERIMENTATION? DO WE CRAVE PREDICTABILITY, OR RELISH SURPRISE? THE TWO POLES, STASIS AND DYNAMISM, INCREASINGLY DEFINE OUR POLITICAL, INTELLECTUAL, AND CULTURAL LAND.Sc.APE. THE CENTRAL QUESTION OF OUR TIME IS WHAT TO DO ABOUT THE FUTURE. AND THAT QUESTION CREATES A DEEP DIVIDE....” [170]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 369

In speaking about science progression, new benefits and new hazards, here it is a summation by the English Crown’s top scientist, Sir Martin Rees.

Sir Martin Rees, Ph.D. : “...Science is emphatically not, as some have claimed, approaching its end; it is surging ahead at an accelerating rate. We are still flummoxed about the bedrock nature of physical reality, and the complexities of life, the brain, and the cosmos. New discoveries, illuminating all these mysteries, will engender benign applications; but will also pose new ethical dilemmas and bring new hazards. How will we balance the multifarious prospective benefits from genetics, robotics, or nanotechnology against the risk (albeit smaller) of triggering utter disaster? .... Science is advancing faster than ever, and on a broader front: bio-, cyber- and nanotechnology all offer exhilarating prospects; so does the exploration of space. But there is a dark side: new science can have unintended consequences; it empowers individuals to perpetrate acts of megaterror; even innocent errors could be catastrophic. The ‘downside’ from twenty-first century technology could be graver and more intractable than the threat of nuclear devastation that we have faced for decades. And human-induced pressures on the global environment may engender higher risks that the age-old hazards of earthquakes, eruptions, and asteroid impacts...” [120]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 370

Why seek ultimate truths under the underlying unturned rocks?

“...From knowledge of the rules each molecule obeys, we can predict the emergence of the structure and function of a material ─ a molecular society and, ultimately, a material culture. Beating heart muscle. Pollutant-filtering molecular sponges. Energy-harvesting solar cells .... Let us embark upon a journey into the world of nanotechnology. Let us see how far we have come in persuading Nature to fashion matter after our needs, in using refined control over atoms, electrons, and photons to better human existence. Let us examine how the latest breakthroughs are revolutionizing human health, environment, and information. Humbled before Nature’s achievements, let us inquire as to our limitations, and contemplate what responsibilities arise in the face of our new found abilities...” [194]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 371

Size, speed, dynamics, and novel realities?

“...Like Moore’s Law for silicon electronics, which says that computers are growing exponentially smaller and more powerful every year, molecular systems developed with DNA nanotechnology have been doubling in size roughly every three years,...” says Professor Erik Winfree at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). [197]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 372

Stephen M.R. Covey observes, “...the world’s fund of information now doubles every two to two and a half years...” [196]

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What is an example of one instituting resiliency?

Dr. Robert Collins, Ph.D. and his “...Ten Commandments of Resilience....” It here ensues the literal citation:

I.- Thou Shalt Have a Written Disaster Plan
II.- Thou Shalt Do Cost Benefit Analysis
III.- Thou Shalt Be Fully Insured
IV.- Thou Shalt Search Out and Repair Vulnerable Systems
V.- Thou Shalt Have Redundant Systems
VI.- Thou Shalt Be Mobile
VII.- Thou Shalt Set and Follow Priorities
VIII.- Thou Shalt Not Depend on Others
IX.- Thou Shalt Keep Lines of Communication Open
X.- Thou Shalt Capitalize on Opportunities

End of citation of the “...Ten Commandments of Resilience....” [125]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 374

Professor Vinge indicated it in 1993: “...Within thirty years, we will have the technological means to create superhuman intelligence. Shortly after, the human era will be ended …Is such progress avoidable? If not to be avoided, can events be guided so that we may survive? These questions are investigated. Some possible answers [and some further dangers] are presented...” Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 375

Is there some evidence about managing intelligence at the microbiological level?

“...In August of 2000, a Japanese scientist named Toshiyuki Nakagaki announce that he had trained an amoebalike organism called slim mold to find the shortest route through a maze. Nakagaki had placed the mold in a small maze comprising four possible routes and planted pieces of food at two of the exits. Despite its being an incredibly primitive organism (a close relative of ordinary fungi) with no centralized brain whatsoever, the slime mold managed to plot the most efficient route to the food, stretching its body through the maze so that it connected directly to the two food sources. Without any apparent cognitive resources, the slime mold had 'solved' the maze puzzle ... For such a simple organism, the slime mold has an impressive intellectual pedigree. Nakagaki's announcement was only the latest in a long chain of investigations into the subtleties of slime mold behavior. For scientists trying to understand systems that use relatively simple components to build higher-level intelligence, the slime mold may someday be seen as the equivalent of the finches and tortoises that Darwin observed on the Galáagos Islands ...” [212]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 376

A misbehaved future?

Virginia Postrel: “...The future we face at the dawn of the twenty-first century is, like all futures left to themselves, ‘emergent, complex messiness.’ Its ‘messiness’ lies not in disorder, but in an order that is unpredictable, spontaneous, and ever shifting, a pattern created by millions of uncoordinated, independent decisions. The pattern contains not just a few high-tech gizmos, but all the variegated aspects of life. As people create and sell products or services, adopt new fashions of speech or dress, form families and choose home towns, make medical decisions and seek spiritual insight, investigate the universe and invent new forms of art, these actions shape a future no one can see, A FUTURE THAT IS DYNAMICAL AND INHERENTLY UNSTABLE....” [170]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 377

“...I never discovered anything with my rational mind....” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 378

Where is the strategic surprise ignored?

John Burdon Sanderson Haldane (1892 — 1964): “...I have no doubt that in reality the future will be vastly more surprising than anything I can imagine. Now my own suspicion is that the universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose....”

Earned in his own intellectual right, Thomas Jefferson most cogently stated:

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 379

They insist that the DNA molecule has been with us through billions of years. Ray Kurzweil proclaims that

“...by the 2030s, the nonbiological portion of our intelligence will predominate...”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 380

What is the world to be, under scenarios, looking like towards 2025?

On the trends to 2025, speaking of “...What Kind of Future?,...”

NIC argues, “...The above trends suggest major discontinuities, shocks, and surprises, which we highlight throughout the text. Examples include nuclear weapons use or a pandemic. In some cases, the surprise element is only a matter of timing: an energy transition, for example is inevitable; the only questions are when and how abruptly or smoothly such a transition occurs. An energy transition from one type of fuel (fossil fuels) to another (alternative) is an event that historically has only happened once a century at most with momentous consequences. The transition from wood to coal helped trigger industrialization. In this case, a transition—particularly an abrupt one—out of fossil fuels would have major repercussions for energy producers in the Middle East and Eurasia, potentially causing permanent decline of some states as global and regional powers .... Other discontinuities are less predictable. They are likely to result from an interaction of several trends and depend on the quality of leadership. We put uncertainties such as whether China or Russia becomes a democracy in this category. China’s growing middle class increases the chances but does not make such a development inevitable. Political pluralism seems less likely in Russia in the absence of economic diversification. Pressure from below may force the issue, or a leader might begin or enhance the democratization process to sustain the economy or spur economic growth. A sustained plunge in the price of oil and gas would alter the outlook and increase prospects for greater political and economic liberalization in Russia. If either country were to democratize, it would represent another wave of democratization with wide significance for many other developing states .... Also uncertain are the outcomes of demographic challenges facing Europe, Japan, and even Russia. In none of these cases does demography have to spell destiny with less regional and global power an inevitable outcome. Technology, the role of immigration, public health improvements, and laws encouraging greater female participation in the economy are some of the measures that could change the trajectory of current trends pointing toward less economic growth, increased social tensions, and possible decline .... Whether global institutions adapt and revive—another key uncertainty—also is a function of leadership. Current trends suggest a dispersion of power and authority will create a global governance deficit. Reversing those trend lines would require strong leadership in the international community by a number of powers, including the emerging ones .... Some uncertainties would have greater consequences—should they occur—than would others. In this work, we emphasize the overall potential for greater conflict—some forms of which could threaten globalization. We put WM.D. terrorism and a Middle East nuclear arms race in this category. The key uncertainties and possible impacts are discussed in the text and summarized in the textbox on page vii. In the four fictionalized scenarios, we have highlighted new challenges that could emerge as a result of the ongoing global transformation. They present new situations, dilemmas, or predicaments that represent departures from recent developments. As a set, they do not cover all possible futures. None of these is inevitable or even necessarily likely; but, as with many other uncertainties, the scenarios are potential game-changers...” [144]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 381

Subsequently, John Naisbitt puts it: “...You just have to hang out with the paradoxes, hang out with the contradictions until you understand them. When there is a perceived contradiction, I like to look for something that helps to resolve the contradiction. A lot of people have an either/or mentality. We get the Internet and everyone says, ‘Well newspapers are going to go away.’ It’s not either/or. There will be a change in the mix, that’s all....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 382

In the same order of ideas, Hamel indicates: “...Look for dis-confirming evidence, for things that don’t fit, for things that don’t ajar....” [64]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 383

DARPA’s adage: “...If you’re not failing frequently, you’re not succeeding enough....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 384

Diplomacy and peace?

What does Ambrose Bierce have to say about peace?: “...[Peace is,] in international affairs, a period of cheating between two periods of fighting...” [130] Brackets are mine.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 385

Winston Churchill argues in this regard: “...If the human race wishes to have a prolonged and indefinite period of material prosperity, they have only got to behave in a peaceful and helpful way toward one another...” [111]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 386

A PROMINENT MESSAGE ON LEADERSHIP FROM THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY:

St. Ignatius Loyola (1491 — 1556) — founder of the Jesuits — :

“...Teach us, good Lord, to serve Thee as Thou deservest;

To give and not to count the cost;

To fight and not to heed the wounds;

To toil and not to seek for rest;

To labour and not to ask for any reward

Save that of knowing that we do Thy will....”

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 387

“...Predictions tend to be linear extrapolations; technological advances tend to throw curves. Predicting poorly one curved is already impossible enough without adding three more curves, to say nothing of the seven others neither of us considered, but which will actually play a more central role...” By Dr. Michael Fossel, Ph.D. , M.D.

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 388

“...We are hanging eyes, ears and sensory organs on our computers and on our networks asking them to observe the physical world on our behalf and to manipulate it. The more you connect computers to the physical world the more the issue of interaction becomes important...” (Attributed to Corporate Design Foundation: May 1991). [195]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 389

ULTIMATE LUMINARIES ON MOST ADVANCED INTELLIGENCE AND TECHNOLOGICAL PROGRESSION (AS OF 2007). ENSUING TWENTY-FOUR ASSERTIONS:

[1 of 24] “...Some people say that computers can never show true intelligence, whatever that may be. But it seems to me that if very complicated chemical molecules can operate in humans to make them intelligent, then equally complicated electronic circuits can also make computers act in an intelligent way. And if they are intelligent, they can presumably design computers that have even greater complexity and intelligence...” ─ By Dr. Stephen Hawking (Lucasian Professor of Mathematics, University of Cambridge).

[2 of 24] “...One consideration that should be taken into account when deciding whether to promote the development of superintelligence is that if superintelligence is feasible, it will likely be developed sooner or later. Therefore, we will probably one day have to take the gamble of superintelligence no matter what. But once in existence, a superintelligence could help us reduce or eliminate other existential risks, such as the risk that advanced nanotechnology will be used by humans in warfare or terrorism, a serious threat to the long-term survival of intelligent life on earth. If we get to superintelligence first, we may avoid this risk from nanotechnology and many others. If, on the other hand, we get nanotechnology first, we will have to face both the risks from nanotechnology and, if these risks are survived, also the risks from superintelligence. The overall risk seems to be minimized by implementing superintelligence, with great care, as soon as possible...” ─ By Dr. Nick Bostrom (Director, Future of Humanity Institute, Oxford University).

[3 of 24] “...We have a hard time motivating people to do stuff in the service of abstract nouns like 'liberty,' but 'singularity' is so abstract as to make 'liberty' seem as concrete as 'imminent car-wreck.' The singularity needs to be the mere abstract cherry on the concrete cake: the funny curiosity to consider as the end-point of a bunch of imminent, relevant, concrete changes in our lives that we need to prepare for and prepare the way for...” ─ By Cory Doctorow (Science Fiction Author, Boing Boing Co-Editor).

[4 of 24] “...To any thoughtful person, the singularity idea, even if it seems wild, raises a gigantic, swirling cloud of profound and vital questions about humanity and the powerful technologies it is producing. Given this mysterious and rapidly approaching cloud, there can be no doubt that the time has come for the scientific and technological community to seriously try to figure out what is on humanity's collective horizon. Not to do so would be hugely irresponsible...” ─ By Dr. Douglas R. Hofstadter (College Professor Of Cognitive and Computer Science, Indiana University, Bloomington).

[5 of 24] “...What, then, is the Singularity? It's a future period during which the pace of technological change will be so rapid, its impact so deep, that human life will be irreversibly transformed. Although neither utopian or dystopian, this epoch will transform the concepts that we rely on to give meaning to our lives, from our business models to the cycle of human life, including death itself. Understanding the Singularity will alter our perspective on the significance of our past and the ramifications for our future. To truly understand it inherently changes one's view of life in general and one's own particular life. I regard someone who understands the Singularity and who has reflected on its implications for his or her own life as a '…singularitarian…'...” ─ By Ray Kurzweil (CEO, Kurzweil Technologies).

[6 of 24] “...The Singularity is a frightening prospect for humanity. I assume that we will somehow dodge it or finesse it in reality, and one way to do that is to warn about it early and begin to build in correctives...” ─ By Stewart Brand (Founder and Chairman, The Long Now Foundation).

[7 of 24] “...It is clear from my work that to tell a truly compelling story, a machine would need to understand the 'inner lives' of his or her characters. And to do that, it would need not only to think mechanically in the sense of swift calculation (the forte of supercomputers like Deep Blue), it would also need to think experientially in the sense of having subjective or phenomenal awareness. For example, a person can think experientially about a trip to Europe as a kid, remember what it was like to be in Paris on a sunny day with an older brother, smash a drive down a fairway, feel a lover's touch, ski on the edge, or need a good night's sleep. But any such example, I claim, will demand capabilities no machine will ever have. Renowned human storytellers understand this concept. For example, playwright Henrik Ibsen said: ' … I have to have the character in mind through and through, I must penetrate into the last wrinkle of his soul ...' Such a modus operandi is forever closed off to a machine...” ─ By Dr. Selmer Bringsjord (Director, Rensselaer AI & Reasoning Laboratory).

[8 of 24] “...There's this stupid myth out there that AI has failed, but AI is everywhere around you every second of the day. People just don't notice it. You've got AI systems in cars, tuning the parameters of the fuel injection systems. When you land in an airplane, your gate gets chosen by an AI scheduling system. Every time you use a piece of Microsoft software, you've got an AI system trying to figure out what you're doing, like writing a letter, and it does a pretty damned good job. Every time you see a movie with computer–generated characters, they're all little AI characters behaving as a group. Every time you play a video game, you're playing against an AI system...” ─ By Dr. Rodney Brooks (Director, MIT Computer Science and AI Laboratory, Chief Technical Officer, IROBOT CORPORATION).

[9 of 24] “...If there is a key driving force pushing towards a singularity, it's international competition for power. This ongoing struggle for power and security is why, in my view, attempts to prevent a singularity simply by international fiat are doomed. The potential capabilities of transformative technologies are simply staggering. No nation will risk falling behind its competitors, regardless of treaties or UN resolutions banning intelligent machines or molecular–scale tools. The uncontrolled global transformation these technologies may spark is, in strategic terms, far less of a threat than an opponent having a decided advantage in their development ─ a 'singularity gap,' if you will. The 'missile gap' that drove the early days of the nuclear arms race would pale in comparison...” ─ By Jamais Cascio (Senior Contributing Editor, WORLDCHANGING).

[10 of 24] “...The world is Organized by embodied beings like us to be coped with by beings like us. The computer would be totally lost in our world. It would have to have in it a model of the world and a model of the body, which AI researchers have tried, but it's certainly hopeless. Without that, the world is just utterly un-graspable by computers .... The truth is that human intelligence can never be replaced with machine intelligence simply because we are not ourselves thinking machines. Each of us has, and uses every day, a power of intuitive intelligence that enables us to understand, to speak, and to cope skillfully with our everyday environment...” ─ By Dr. Hubert Dreyfus (Professor of Philosophy, University of California, Berkeley).

[11 of 24] “...If you invent a breakthrough in artificial intelligence, so machines can learn, that is worth 10 Microsofts...” ─ By Bill Gates (Chairman and Chief Software Architect, Microsoft Corporation).

[12 of 24] “...There is no good reason to believe that the emergence of the modern human mind is the end state of the evolution of psyche. Indeed, the rub is this: While evolution might take millions of years to generate another psychological sea change as dramatic as the emergence of modern humanity, technology may do the job much more expediently. The Singularity can be expected to induce rapid and dramatic change in the nature of life, mind and experience...” ─ By Dr. Ben Goertzel (CEO, Novamente LLC).

[13 of 24] “...It's haughty of us to think we're the end product of evolution. All of us are a part of producing whatever is coming next. We're at an exciting time. We're close to the singularity. Go back to that litany of chemistry leading to single–celled organisms, leading to intelligence. The first step took a billion years, the next step took a hundred million, and so on. We're at a stage where things change on the order of decades, and it seems to be speeding up. Technology has the autocatalytic effect of fast computers, which let us design better and faster computers faster. We're heading toward something which is going to happen very soon – in our lifetimes – and which is fundamentally different from anything that's happened in human history before...” ─ By Dr. W. Daniel Hillis (Chairman and Chief Technology Officer, Applied Minds).

[14 of 24] “...The 21st–century technologies — genetics, nanotechnology, and robotics (GNR) – are so powerful that they can spawn whole new classes of accidents and abuses. Most dangerously, for the first time, these accidents and abuses are widely within the reach of individuals or small groups. They will not require large facilities or rare raw materials. Knowledge alone will enable the use of them. Thus we have the possibility not just of weapons of mass destruction but of knowledge–enabled mass destruction (KM.D. ), this destructiveness hugely amplified by the power of self–replication. I think it is no exaggeration to say we are on the cusp of the further perfection of extreme evil, an evil whose possibility spreads well beyond that which weapons of mass destruction bequeathed to the nation–states, on to a surprising and terrible empowerment of extreme individuals...” ─ By Bill Joy (Managing Partner, Kleiner, Perkins, Caufields & Byers).

[15 of 24] “...Every cybernetic totalist fantasy relies on artificial intelligence. It might not immediately be apparent why such fantasies are essential to those who have them. If computers are to become smart enough to design their own successors, initiating a process that will lead to God-like omniscience after a number of ever-swifter passages from one generation of computers to the next, someone is going to have to write the software that gets the process going, and humans have given absolutely no evidence of being able to write such software. So the idea is that the computers will somehow become smart on their own and write their own software ... My primary objection to this way of thinking is pragmatic: It results in the creation of poor-quality real-world software in the present. Cybernetic totalists live with their heads in the future and are willing to accept obvious flaws in present software in support of a fantasy world that might never appear ... The whole enterprise of artificial intelligence is based on an intellectual mistake, and continues to expensively turn out poorly designed software as it is remarketed under a new name for every new generation of programmers...” ─ By Jaron Lanier (Computer Scientist, Composer, Visual Artist, and Author).

[16 of 24] “... ... Two quite detailed scenarios have emerged, one the Moravec/Kurzweil scenario, which we might call the 'Out to Pasture in the Elysian Fields,' that foresees machines as intelligent as humans, maybe more so, in 50 years and on the whole, a good thing. This leads to questions both Moravec and Kurzweil, to their credit, raise about whether those machines will take over for us (or from us), the basis of the second scenario, Bill Joy's quite opposite and dark vision, which posits the same improvement in machine intelligence, but with a horrifying outcome, the '…NanoGenRoboNightmare ... ' Some believers in the Elysian fields scenario have been arguing about 'the singularity,' borrowed from science fiction writer Vernor Vinge, the moment AI becomes powerful and ubiquitous enough so that all of the rules change and there's no going back. [...] I don't consider either of these scenarios implausible...” Pamela McCorduck (Author of Machines Who Think).

[17 of 24] “...We need to do an unlikely thing: we need to survey the world we now inhabit and proclaim it good. Good enough. Not in every detail; there are a thousand improvements, technological and cultural, that we can and should still make. But good enough in its outlines, in its essentials. We need to decide that we live, most of us in the West, long enough. We need to declare that, in the West, where few of us work ourselves to the bone, we have ease enough. In societies where most of us need storage lockers more than we need nanotech miracle boxes, we need to declare that we have enough stuff. Enough intelligence. Enough capability. Enough...” ─ By Bill McKibben (Author, Enough: Staying Human In An Engineered Age.)

[18 of 24] “...Only a small community has concentrated on general intelligence. No one has tried to make a thinking machine and then teach it chess — or the very sophisticated oriental board game Go. [...] The bottom line is that we really haven't progressed too far toward a truly intelligent machine. We have collections of dumb specialists in small domains; the true majesty of general intelligence still awaits our attack. [...] We have got to get back to the deepest questions of AI and general intelligence and quit wasting time on little projects that don't contribute to the main goal...” ─ By Dr. Marvin Minsky (Toshiba Professor, Media Arts and Sciences, MIT).

[19 of 24] “...It may seem rash to expect fully intelligent machines in a few decades, when the computers have barely matched insect mentality in a half–century of development. Indeed, for that reason, many long–time artificial intelligence researchers scoff at the suggestion, and offer a few centuries as a more believable period. But there are very good reasons why things will go much faster in the next fifty years than they have in the last fifty... Since 1990, the power available to individual AI and robotics programs has doubled yearly, to 30 MIPS (machine instructions per second) by 1994 and 500 MIPS by 1998. Seeds long ago alleged barren are suddenly sprouting. Machines read text, recognize speech, even translate languages. Robots drive cross–country, crawl across Mars, and trundle down office corridors. In 1996 a theorem–proving program called EQP running five weeks on a 50 MIPS computer at Argonne National Laboratory found a proof of a Boolean algebra conjecture by Herbert Robbins that had eluded mathematicians for sixty years. And it is still only Spring. Wait until Summer...” ─ By Dr. Hans Moravec (Chief Scientist, Seegrid Corporation).

[20 of 24] “...In the end, this search for ways to enhance ourselves is a natural part of being human. The urge to transform ourselves has been a force in history as far back as we can see. It's been selected for by millions of years of evolution. It's wired deep in our genes — a natural outgrowth of our human intelligence, curiosity, and drive. To turn our backs on this power would be to turn our backs on our true nature. Embracing our quest to understand and improve on ourselves doesn't call into question our humanity — it reaffirms it...” ─ By Ramez Naam (Author of More Than Human: Embracing The Promise of Biological Enhancement, Software Developer, Microsoft).

[21 of 24] “...I want to focus on a different aspect of Ken MacLeod's 'Rapture of the Nerds' comment, because I actually think it cuts both ways. Yes, it's possible to draw parallels between the Christian idea of The Rapture — and, even more generally, between religious ideas of transcendence generally — and the notion that, once human technology passes a certain threshold, roughly that described by Vinge and other singularity enthusiasts, human beings will potentially enjoy the kind of powers and pleasures traditionally assigned to gods or beings in heaven: Limitless lifespans, if not immortality, superhuman powers, virtually limitless wealth, fleshly pleasures on demand, etc. .... These do sound like the sorts of things that religions have promised their followers throughout human history. That leads some who invoke MacLeod's comment to contend that because singularity enthusiasts hope for the same kinds of things that religious believers have hoped for, singularity enthusiasts are merely adherents to a new sort of religion, the religion of science ... But as Isaac Asimov has noted, the religion of science is distinguished by one chief characteristic: 'that it works.' I express no opinion on whether science will actually deliver on these hopes. But I note that people once looked to supernatural sources for such now-mundane things as cures for baldness or impotence, only to find those desires satisfied, instead, by modern pharmacology. Yet that hardly makes those who place their faith in pharmacology members of a religion — or, if it does, it makes them members of a religion that is distinguishable from those dependent on the supernatural...” ─ By Glenn Harland Reynolds (Professor of Law, University of Tennessee)

[22 of 24] “...'…Could a machine think?...' My own view is that only a machine could think, and indeed only very special kinds of machines, namely brains and machines that had the same causal powers as brains. And that is the main reason strong AI has had little to tell us about thinking, since it has nothing to tell us about machines. By its own definition, it is about programs, and programs are not machines. Whatever else intentionality is, it is a biological phenomenon, and it is as likely to be as causally dependent on the specific biochemistry of its origins as lactation, photosynthesis, or any other biological phenomena. No one would suppose that we could produce milk and sugar by running a computer simulation of the formal sequences in lactation and photosynthesis, but where the mind is concerned many people are willing to believe in such a miracle because of a deep and abiding dualism: the mind they suppose is a matter of formal processes and is independent of quite specific material causes in the way that milk and sugar are not.....” ─ By Dr. John Searle (Slusser Professor of Philosophy, University of California, Berkeley).

[23 of 24] “...Before the invention of writing, almost every insight was happening for the first time (at least to the knowledge of the small groups of humans involved). When you are at the beginning, everything is new. In our era, almost everything we do in the arts is done with awareness of what has been done before. In the early post–human era, things will be new again because anything that requires greater than human ability has not already been done by Homer or da Vinci or Shakespeare...” ─ By Dr. Vernor Vinge (Mathematician, Computer Scientists, and Science Fiction Author).

[24 of 24] “...I certainly think that humans are not the limit of evolutionary complexity. There may indeed be post–human entities, either organic or silicon–based, which can in some respects surpass what a human can do. I think it would be rather surprising if our mental capacities were matched to understanding all the keys levels of reality. The chimpanzees certainly aren't, so why should ours be either? So there may be levels that will have to await some post-human emergence...” ─ By Sir Martin Rees (Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics, Trinity College). [200]

Sample of Dynamic Driving Force and/or Quotation # 390

Incidentally, Every Scientific and Technological Progression available and that is into a '' ...doubling ...” magnitude is synthesized her:

Doubling A:

“... HUMAN KNOWLEDGE IS DOUBLING EVERY TEN YEARS [AS PER THE 1998 STANDARDS]. In the past decade, more scientific knowledge has been created than in all of human history ...” (http://bit.ly/1nOc5Xm ). Brackets are mine.

Doubling B:

“... COMPUTER POWER IS DOUBLING EVERY EIGHTEEN MONTHS. THE INTERNET IS DOUBLING EVERY YEAR. THE NUMBER OF DNA SEQUENCES WE CAN ANALYZE IS DOUBLING EVERY TWO YEARS ...” (http://bit.ly/1gn4CdX )

Doubling C:

“ ...IN FACT, BECAUSE BOTH COMPUTER POWER AND DNA SEQUENCING DOUBLE ROUGHLY EVERY TWO YEARS, ONE CAN COMPUTE THE ROUGH TIME FRAME OVER WHICH MANY SCIENTIFIC BREAKTHROUGHS WILL TAKE PLACE .... BY 2020 ...” (http://bit.ly/1lZQ1Vc)

Doubling D:

“...SCIENTIFIC MANPOWER IS DOUBLING EVERY 12 YEARS IN A RATE OF GROWTH MORE THAN THREE TIMES THAT OF OUR POPULATION AS A WHOLE, DESPITE THAT, THE VAST STRETCHES OF THE UNKNOWN AND THE UNANSWERED AND THE UNFINISHED STILL FAR OUTSTRIP OUR COLLECTIVE COMPREHENSION...” [80] (http://1.usa.gov/1eyRLTK).

Doubling E:

“ ...THE FIRST DOUBLING OF THAT KNOWLEDGE TOOK PLACE ABOUT 1700 A.D. THE SECOND DOUBLING OCCURRED AROUND THE YEAR 1900. IT IS ESTIMATED TODAY THAT THE WORLD'S KNOWLEDGE BASE WILL DOUBLE AGAIN BY 2010 AND AGAIN AFTER THAT BY 2013...” [37] (http://bit.ly/1iptmkn).

Doubling F:

“...[THERE IS A] DOUBLING EVERY TWO YEARS [REGARDING THE TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT OF] SOLAR ENERGY BY APPLYING NANOTECHNOLOGY TO SOLAR PANELS...” [177] (http://bit.ly/1jgckIJ). Brackets are mine.

Doubling G:

“...NANO-GENETIC SEQUENCING DATA … IS DOUBLING EVERY YEAR...” [177] (http://slidesha.re/1f3MUH2).

Doubling I:

“...KNOWLEDGE IS DOUBLING BY EVERY FOURTEEN MONTHS...” [177] (http://bit.ly/1dc8Zb4).

Doubling J:

“...MORE THAN THE DOUBLING OF COMPUTATIONAL POWER [IS TAKING PLACE] EVERY YEAR...” [177] (http://bit.ly/1mn8Btl). Brackets are mine.

Doubling K:

“...Like Moore’s Law for silicon electronics, which says that computers are growing exponentially smaller and more powerful every year, molecular systems developed with DNA nanotechnology have been doubling in size roughly every three years,...” says Professor Erik Winfree at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). [197] (http://bit.ly/1f3NEMq).

AUTHOR:

Mr. Andres Agostini

www.linkedin.com/in/AndresAgostini

The Future of Scientific Management, Today! At http://lnkd.in/bYP2nDC

http://lnkd.in/WUm7zA or http://ThisSuccess.wordpress.com

The Future of Space-Age Risk Management: Transformative and Integrative Risk Management!
By Mr. Andres Agostini. At https://lifeboat.com/blog/2014/03/omniscentia

AS A CONSULTANT, MANAGER, STRATEGIST AND RESEARCHER, ANDRES WORKS AND HAS WORKED WITH INSTITUTIONS ─ AND THE RESPECTIVE EXECUTIVES OF SAID ORGANIZATIONS ─ SUCH AS:

► Toyota,
► Mitsubishi,
► World Bank,
► Shell,
► Statoil,
► Total,
► Exxon,
► Mobil,
► PDVSA, Citgo,
► GE,
► GMAC,
► TNT Express,
► AT&T
► GTE,
► Amoco,
► BP,
► Abbot Laboratories,
► World Health Organization,
► Ernst Young Consulting,
► SAIC (Science Applications International Corporation),
► Pak Mail,
► Wilpro Energy Services,
► Phillips Petroleum Company,
► Dupont,
► Conoco,
► ENI (Italy’s petroleum state-owned firm),
► Chevron,
► LDG Management (HCC Benefits).
Annotated Bibliography.

NB: All links and web addresses were checked and verified to be correct at the time of publication. Because of the dynamical nature of the web, some addresses and links may have changed since publication and may no longer be valid.

[1] Every quotation and/or citation is attributed to the mentioned author of said quotation.
[2] Sir Francis Bacon (Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1
[3] Dr. Bertrand Russell (Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1)
[4] Dr. Albert Einstein (Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1)
[5] Dr. Buckminster Fuller (Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1) and at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[6] Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1) and at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[7] Theodore Roosevelt at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[8] Ralph Waldo Emerson at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[9] Dr. Malcolm Knowles at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[10] Dr. Albert Einstein at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[11] Thomas Jefferson at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[12] Dr. Henry Kissinger at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[13] Sir Winston Churchill at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[14] Antonio Machado from Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1.
[15] The Panchatantra (body of Eastern philosophical knowledge) from Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1. And at << http://bit.ly/bj0rI1 >>
[16] Bernard d'Espagnat from Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1.
[17] Peter Drucker from Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1.
[18] Dr. James D. Watson, Ph.D. as he was interviewed by Charlie Rose most recently in year 2009.
[19] Arthur C. Clarke at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[20] Otto Herman Khan at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[21] General Francisco de Miranda from Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, ISBN: 0-19-866185-1.
[22] James Canton, “...Technofutures: How Leading-Edge Innovations Will Transform Business in the 21st Century...” by James Canton (http://amzn.to/bYrN8q )
[23] “...Revolutionary Wealth: How it will be created and how it will change our lives...” by Alvin Toffler and Heidi Toffler (ISBN-10: 038552207X)
[24] Ella Wheeler Wilcox at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[25] “...Future Shock...” by Alvin Toffler (ISBN-10: 0553277375)
[26] “...Fantastic Voyage: Live Long Enough to Live Forever...” by Ray Kurzweil and Terry Grossman ( ISBN-10: 0140282025 )
[27] “...Transcend: Nine Steps to Living Well Forever...” by Ray Kurzweil Ph.D. and Terry Grossman M.D. (ISBN-10: 1605299561)
[28] “...Leading the Revolution...” by Gary Hamel (ISBN-10: 1591391466)
[29] “...Emotional Intelligence...” by Daniel Goleman (ISBN-10:055309503X )
[30] Criss-cross at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[31] Crinkum-crankum at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[32] Terzetto at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[33] Thé dansant at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[34] Tertium quid at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[35] Computronium at http://bit.ly/bvf2AE
[36] Futureketing at http://bit.ly/aP2VlF
[37] “...Einstein in the Boardroom...” by Suzanne S. Harrison and Patrick H. Sullivan Sr. (ISBN-10: 0-471-70332-X
[38] Tête-à-tête at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[39] Dilettantes and poseurs at Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[40] “...Why Mars and Venus Collide: Improving Relationships by Understanding How Men and Women Cope Differently with Stress...” by John Gray.
[41] Multiverse at http://bit.ly/2FTBYa
[42] “...The Cycle of Leadership...” by Noel M. Tichy (ISBN0-06-662056-2)
[43] Herman Kahn’s quotations at http://bit.ly/bgxeP0
[44] “...Innovate Like Edison: The Five-Step System for Breakthrough Business Success...” By Michael J. Gelb (ISBN-10: 0452289823)
[45] Déclassé at Oxford Dictionary (ISBN 0-19-861122-6)
[46] Démodé at Oxford Dictionary (ISBN 0-19-861122-6)
[47] Richard Buckminster Fuller at http://bit.ly/amahEh
[48] Yoctosecond, definition of, at http://bit.ly/c5ZMZS
[49] Dr. Pangloss at http://bit.ly/b5LkXL
[50] “...Monster of omniscience...” at page V, first paragraph, Concise Oxford Dictionary (ISBN 0-19-861122-6). Also viewable online at http://bit.ly/Omniscience-Monter-Bibliography
[51] Quotations by Karl Popper at http://bit.ly/d9GdeX
[52] “...Radical Evolution...” by Joel Garreau (ISBN0-385-50965-0).
[53] Definition of “...throughput....” Throughput: Output or production, as of a computer program, over a period of time. The quantity or amount of raw material processed within a given time, esp. the work done by an electronic computer in a given period of time. An amount of work, etc. done in a particular period of time. Volume of data or material handled: the amount of something such as data or raw material that is processed over a given period.
[54] The American Heritage Dictionary’s (fourth edition, 2000)— ISBN 0-395-82517-2
[55] By John F. Kennedy, Address at Rice University on the Nation's Space Effort Delivered in Houston, Texas, September 12, 1962. SOURCE: http://bit.ly/ckBJ4r (seen on June 12, 2007).
[56] “...The Art of The Long View...” ─ ISBN 0-385-26731-2
[57] “...The New Religion of Risk Management...” by Peter L. Bernstein, Harvard Business Review, March-April 1996.
[58] As quoted in title ─ ISBN 978-980-293-503-1
[59] As cited by David Jay's 2006 textbook, “...Mavericks of Medicine...” (ISBN: 1-890572-19-5)
[60] http://bit.ly/LuNRa
[61] Einstein “...on being smart...” at http://bit.ly/EZMFj
[62] “...A Devil’s Dictionary of Business...” (2005) — ISBN 1-56025-712-1 by Nicholas von Hoffman
[63] Original source: http://bit.ly/aEmAkO
[64] Textbook: “...Leading The Revolution...” (ISBN 1-57851-189-5), year 2000, by Gary Hamel
[65] Oxford Dictionary ISBN 0-19-861122-6
[66] Textbook known as “...A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations...” by Alan L. Mackay (ISBN-10: 075031066) in 1991.
[67] Dr. Stephen Hawking was interviewed by CNN's journalist Becky Anderson in year 2009.
[68] http://bit.ly/9aLCB4
[69] “...A Dictionary of scientific quotations...” By Alan Lindsay Mackay - ISBN-10: 0750301066
[70] The Oxford dictionary of quotations - ISBN-10: 0199237174
[71] “...The Book of Positive Quotations,...” 2nd Edition (2007) — ISBN-10: 1577491696
[72] “...The Yale Book Of Quotations...” by Fred R. Shapiro (2006) — ISBN-10: 0300107986
[73] Well said, well spoken: 736 quotable quotes for educators by Robert D. Ramsey (1999) — ISBN-10: 0060194111
[74] Compelling conversations: questions and quotations on timeless topics by Erin Hermann Roth (2007) — ISBN-10: 141965828X
[75] Wit and Wisdom of the American Presidents: A Book of Quotations by Joslyn T. Pine (2000) - ISN-10: 0486414272
[76] The Routledge Dictionary Of Latin Quotations by Jon R. Stone (2004) ISBN-10: 0415969085
[77] Quote Unquote by M.P. Singh (2004) — ISBN: 1557099405
[78] “...Inevitable Surprises: Thinking Ahead in a Time of Turbulence...” by Peter Schwartz (2004) — ISBN-10: 1592400698
[79] “...Mind Set...” by John Naisbitt (2008) — ISBN-10: 0061136891
[80] http://bit.ly/2lvo4q
[81] As per David Jay Brown’s text book “...Mavericks of Medicine...” (2006) — ISBN 1-890572-19-5
[82] Singularity: Webster's Quotations, Facts and Phrases By Inc Icon Group International.
[83] http://bit.ly/b3aBN4
[84] Cumputronium at Wikipedia at http://bit.ly/4zTEHn
[85] Multiverse at Wikipedia at http://bit.ly/2FTBYa
[86] James N. Gardner’s “...The Intelligent Universe...” (2007) — ISBN-13: 978-1564149190
[87] Gary Hamel’s textbook “...Competing for the Future...” (1996) — ISBN-10: 0875847161
[88] Gary Hamel’s “...Leading The Revolution...” book — ISBN-10: 1591391466
[89] Eamonn kelly’s book “...Powerful Times...” (2006) — ISBN 0-131-85520-4
[90] http://bit.ly/bLrAOk (bibliography to Fuzzy Logic and Quantum Mechanics)
[91] As cited on “...The Juran Prescription...” by Kathleen Jennison Goonan, M.D. — ISBN 0—7879-0096
[92] Http://Futureketing.blogspot.com/
[93] http://bit.ly/Past_Vs_Now
[94] http://bit.ly/Industrial-Military-Complex
[95] The State Of The University: Academic Knowledges And The Knowledge Of God (2007) By Stanley Hauerwas, B.D. M.A. M.Phil and Ph.D. — ISBN-10: 0300057253
[96] http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Future
[97] http://www.wfs.org/forecasts.htm
[98] In the Book “...How We Decide...” (2009) by Jonah Lehrer — ISBN 978-0-618-62011-1
[99] “...Managing Risk: Systematic Loss Prevention for Executives...” (1987) — ISBN 0-13-551110-0 by Dr. Vernon Grose, D.Sc.
[100] http://bit.ly/9xPbxJ
[101] http://bit.ly/9yTWk5
[102] Adam Gordon in Book “...Future Savvy ...” ( 2008 ) — ISBN-10: 0814409121
[103] J. Scott Armstrong in book “...Principles of Forecasting...” — ISBN: 0792379306
[104] Bob Seidensticker's book "Future Hype..." (2006) — ISBN-10: 1576753700
[105] Dr. Philip Zimbardo, Ph.D. ’s book “...The Time Paradox...” (2009) — ISBN-10: 1416541993
[106] Hans Moravec’s “...Mind Children: The Future of Robot and Human Intelligence...” (1990) — ISBN-10: 06745761187
[107] David Jay Brown’s “...Mavericks of Medicine...” (2006) — ISBN: 1-890572-19-5
[108] Quotations under this number either has been sent to me via e-mail or have emerged as a result of private interviews.
[109] http://bit.ly/9P6HHB
[110] http://bit.ly/be9kE4
[111] Quotations at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[112] The Adult Learner, Sixth Edition: The Definitive Classic in Adult Education and Human Resource Development by Malcolm S. Knowles Ph.D. (2005) — ISBN-10: 0750678372
[113] Napoleon Bonaparte: A Life By Alan Schom (1998) — ISBN-10: 0060929588
[114] “...Science But Not Scientists...” By Vernon Grose (2006) — ISBN-10: 1425969917
[115] Http://www.jfklibrary.org/
[116] Http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/
[117] Gerard K. O’Neill’s “...The High Frontier...” (2000) — ISBN-10: 189652267x
[118] "Life's Solution: Inevitable Humans in a Lonely Universe" by Simon Conway Morris, Ph.D. — ( 2004) — ISBN-10: 0521603250
[119] “...Frases Celebres Para Toda Ocasión...” (In Spanish, “...Famous Sentences For Every Occasion) ─ (1993) By Rafael Escandon — ISBN 968-13-1285-6
[120] “...Our Final Hour...” (2003) By Sir Martin Rees — ISBN 0-465-0682-6
[121] http://bit.ly/xXGMf
[122] http://bit.ly/aMQjdV
[123] “...A Risk Management Approach to Business Continuity: Aligning Business Continuity with Corporate Governance...” (2006) — ISBN: 1931332363
[124] Dr. Robert A. Collins, Ph.D. ’s “...Resilience: Protecting your Business from Disasters in a Dangerous World...” (2007) — ISBN-10: 0595409245
[125] “...Thinking in Technical Analysis...” (2000) By Rick Bensignor— ISBN-10: 1576600491
[126] http://linkd.in/chnhzH
[127] Source: “...Against The Gods...” (1998 ) ‭— By Peter L. Bernstein ‭— ISBN: 0-471-29563-9
[128] http://bit.ly/9h9prC
[129] Quotations and citations that are solely under the own and utter discernment and intellectual faculties of the present author. Among many amenities that are described in my biography, I am a perpetual and ruthless researcher.
[130] “...Diccionario de Citas...” (Spanish, “...Dictionary of Quotations...”) by Castañares y Quiroz ─ ISBN 84-87462-03-0
[131] Respondent’s answers are in actuality own quotations of those authors, whose citations are accurate and available at <<www.brainyquote.com>>.
[132] http://bit.ly/mB6Oo
[133] “...Principles of Counseling and Psychotherapy: Learning the Essential Domains and Nonlinear Thinking of Master Practitioner...” (2009) ─ Gerald J. Mozdziers, Paul R. Peluso, Joseph Lisiecki ─ ISBN-10: 0415997518
[134] “...Cracking Creativity...” by Michael Michalko ─ ISBN 1-58008-311-0
[135] “...The Definitive Handbook of Business Continuity Management...” (2007) By Andrew Hiles ─ ISBN 0470516380
[136] Ray Kurzweil’s quotations at ‹brainyquotes.com›
[137] http://bit.ly/9BWSVQ
[138] http://bit.ly/bCOZDF
[139] “...The World is Flat...” By Thomas L. Friedman (2006) ─ ISBN-10: 0-374-29279-5
[140] “...Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative...” (2001) By Ken Robinson – ISBN-10: 1841121258
[141] http://bit.ly/NfD8z
[142] The Singularity is Near (2005) by Ray Kurzweil ─ ISBN 0-670-03384-7
[143] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_V._Gerstner,_Jr.
[144] www.dni.gov/nic/NIC_2025_project.html
[145] http://www.saffo.com/
[146] http://www.monitorinstitute.com/
[147] http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Alvin_Toffler
[148] http://www.brainyquotes.com/quotes/authors/a/alvin_toffler.html
[149] http://bit.ly/9gQMiY
[150] http://slidesha.re/9CN0mO
[151] http://bit.ly/10V0Xm
[152] http://bit.ly/dWw04
[153] The 8th Habit (2004) By Dr. Stephen R. Covey ─ ISBN 0-684-84665-9
[154] Blown to Bits: How the New Economics of Information Transforms Strategy (1999) ─ ISBN-10: 087584877X By Thomas S. Wurster
[155] Blown to Bits: Your Life, Liberty, and Happiness (2008) ─ ISBN-10: 0137135599 By Hal Abelson
[156] http://bit.ly/a3oaUk
[157] “...The Failure of Risk Management...” (2009) ─ ISBN-10: 0470387955 By Douglas W. Hubbard
[158] http://www.thefreedictionary.com/futurism
[159] http://www.thefreedictionary.com/futurology
[160] “...Futuristics: Looking Ahead...” ( 2005 ) By Dr. Arthur B. Shostak, Ph.D. ─ ISBN-10: 0791084019
[161] “...Moving Along: Far Ahead...” (2005) By Dr. Arthur B. Shostak ─ ISBN-10: 0791084043
[162] “...Creating Better Futures: Scenario Planning As a Tool for A Better Tomorrow...” (2002 ) By James A. Ogilvy ─ ISBN-10: 0195146115
[163] “...As the Futures Catches You: How Genomics & Other Forces Are Changing Your Life, Work, Health and Wealth...” (2005) By Juan Enriquez ─ ISBN-10: 1400047749
[164] “...Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species...” (2001) By Peter Menzel and Faith D’Aluisio ─ ISBN-10: 0262632454
[165]...”...Beyond Humanity: Cyberevolution and Future Minds...” (1996) By Gregory S. Paul and Earl Cox ─ ISBN-10: 1886801215
[166] http://bit.ly/gWka0N
[167] “...Managing Product and Service Development...” (2006) By Stefan Thomke ─ ISBN-10: 0073023019
[168] “...The Art of Asking: Ask Better Questions, Get Better Answers...” (2008) By Terry J. Fadem ─ ISBN-10: 0137144245
[169] “...Beyond Humanity: Cyberevolution and Future Minds...” (1996) By Gregory S. Paul and Earl Cox ─ ISBN-10: 1886801215
[170] “...The Future and Its Enemies: The Growing Conflict Over Creativity, Enterprise, and Progress...” (1999) By Virginia Postrel ─ ISBN-10: 0684862697
[171] “...Visions: How Science Hill Revolutionize the 21st Century...” (1998) By Dr. Michio Kaku, Ph.D. ─ ISBN-10: 0385484992
[172] http://bit.ly/dXWGm2
[173] http://bit.ly/guBaWL
[174] “...Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel...” (2009) ─ ISBN-10: 0307278824 By Dr. Michio Kaku
[175] “...The Gutenberg Galaxy: The Making of Typographic Man...” (1962) By Dr. Marshall McLuhan, Ph.D. ─ ISBN-10: 0802060412
[176] http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6B16U920101203
[177] http://bit.ly/fnOO6h
[178] Massive Change (2004) ─ ISBN-10: 0714844012 By Bruce Mau
[179] The Artilect War: Cosmists Vs. Terrans: A Bitter Controversy Concerning Whether Humanity Should Build Godlike Massively Intelligent Machines (2005) ─ ISBN-10: 0882801546 by Hugo de Garis
[180] “...Creating Tomorrow’s Schools Today: Education – Our Children – Their Futures...” (2010) ─ ISBN-10: 1855393948 by Richard Gerver
[181] http://tiny.cc/p3piz
[182] “...The Extreme Future: The Top Trends That Will Reshape the World in the Next 20 Years...” (2007) ─ ISBN-10: 0452288665 By James Canton
[183] “...The Predictioneer’s Game: Using the Logic of Brazen Self-Interest to See and Shape the Future...” (2010) ─ ISBN-10: 081297977X By Bruce Bueno de Mesquita
[184] “...Crucial Questions About the Future...” (2002) ─ ISBN-10: 0819182753 By Allen Tough
[185] http://tiny.cc/j33u9
[186] http://tiny.cc/ocn6a
[187] Synaptic Self: Our Brains Become Who We Are (2002) ─ ISBN 0-670-03028-7
[188] The Political economy of information (1988) By Vincent Mosco and Janet Wasko ─ ISBN 0-299-11570-4
[189] Management Information Systems (2009) ISBN-10: 013607846X By Ken Laudon (Author), Jane Laudon (Author)
[190] http://tiny.cc/xbob0
[191] Wilson's Ghost: Reducing The Risk Of Conflict, Killing, And Catastrophe In The 21st Century by Robert S. McNamara (2003) ─ ISBN-10: 1586481436
[192] Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach (3rd Edition) by Stuart Russell and Peter Norvig (Dec 11, 2009) ─ ISBN-10: 0136042597
[193] http://3.ly/XWtr
[194] “...The Dance of Molecules: How Nanotechnology is Changing Our Lives...” (2006) – ISBN-10: 1-56025-895-0 by Ted Sargent
[195] http://goo.gl/YFQZ6
[196] The Speed of Trust (2006) ─ ISBN-10: 0-7432-9730-X ─ By Stephen M. R. Covey
[197] Managing Innovation: Integrating Technological, Market and Organizational Change (2009) ─ISBN-10: 0470998105 ─By Joe Tidd, John Bessant
[198] http://goo.gl/LuojF
[199] http://bigthink.com/ideas/14657
[200] Source: http://goo.gl/iFpX2
[201] Hyperinnovation: Multidimensional Enterprise in the Connected Economy (2002) ─ ISBN-10: 0333994388 by Chris Harris
[202] “...Learning from the Future: Competitive Foresight Scenarios...” (1997) ─ ISBN-10: 0471303526 By Liam Fahey, Robert M. Randall
[203] “...Rethinking the Future: Rethinking Business, Principles, Competition, Control & Complexity, Leadership, Markets, and the World...” (1998) ─ ISBN-10: 9781857881080 By Rowan Gibson
[204] “...Connect the Dots... To Become An Impact Plyer...” (2003) ─ ISBN-10: 0595294928 By Dick Lynch
[205] Source: http://goo.gl/7KGG4
[206] “...The Leader Manager...” (1986) ─ ISBN-10: 0471836931 by John N. Williansom
[207] ISBN 978-0-309-11660-2
[208] http://goo.gl/dvfoQ
[209] Inscription in Washington National Archives’ building.
[210] Found via search engine query as it was earlier mentioned in REDES, the scientific television program from the Spanish state-owned television network. (As it was seen in August 2011).
[211] http://goo.gl/3GoQe
[212] Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software ─ ISBN-10: 0684868768 by Steven Johnson
[213] www.time.com/time/printout/0,8816,2048299,00.html
[214] The (Mis)behavior of Markets (2004) ─ ISBN-13 978-0-465-04355-2 By Benoit Mandelbrot
[215] The Lights in the Tunnel (2009) ─ ISBN-13: 978-1448659814 by Martin Ford
[216] Thinking for a Change: Discovering the Power to Create, Communicate and Lead (1996) by Michael Gelb ─ ISBN-10: 1854104209
[217] No Higher Honor: A Memoir of My Years in Washington ─ (2011) ─ ISBN-13: 978-0307587862 by Condoleezza Rice
ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR SUGGESTED READING:

The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology by Ray Kurzweil (http://amzn.to/co6tRs)

Lessons from the Future: Making Sense of a Blurred World from the World's Leading Futurist by Stanley M. Davis (http://amzn.to/colOCU )

It's Alive: The Coming Convergence of Information, Biology, and Business by Christopher Meyer and Stan Davis (http://amzn.to/dCMqzv)

Blur: The Speed of Change in the Connected Economy by Stan Davis and Christopher Meyer (http://amzn.to/98fuay )

Future Wealth by Stanley M. Davis and Christopher Meyer (http://amzn.to/9V9Rk9 )

The Intelligent Universe: AI, ET, and the Emerging Mind of the Cosmos by James N. Gardner and Ray Kurzweil (http://amzn.to/dv22bO)

Seeing What's Next: Using Theories of Innovation to Predict Industry Change by Clayton M. Christensen, Erik A. Roth, and Scott D. Anthony ( http://amzn.to/bLyEIo )

Our Final Hour: A Scientist's Warning by Martin J. Rees ( http://amzn.to/cRz6KE )

Technofutures: How Leading-Edge Innovations Will Transform Business in the 21st Century by James Canton (http://amzn.to/bYrN8q )

The Extreme Future: The Top Trends That Will Reshape the World in the Next 20 Years by James Canton (http://amzn.to/9RqNVm )

 

1

Comment — comments are now closed.

  • N Bhashyam on March 26, 2014 5:02 am

    Change is inevitable but to manage its focus and pace is the challenge to the management in the emerging knowledge era..