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Mar 6, 2010

Reflections on Avatar

Posted by in category: futurism

I recently watched James Cameron’s Avatar in 3D. It was an enjoyable experience in some ways, but overall I left dismayed on a number of levels.

It was enjoyable to watch the lush three-dimensional animation and motion capture controlled graphics. I’m not sure that 3D will take over – as many now expect – until we get rid of the glasses (and there are emerging technologies to do that albeit, the 3D effect is not yet quite as good), but it was visually pleasing.

While I’m being positive, I was pleased to see Cameron’s positive view of science in that the scientists are “good” guys (or at least one good gal) with noble intentions on learning the wisdom of the Na’vi natives and on negotiating a diplomatic solution.

The Na’vi were not completely technology-free. They basically used the type of technology that Native Americans used hundreds of years ago – same clothing, domesticated animals, natural medicine, and bows and arrows.

They were in fact exactly like Native Americans. How likely is that? Life on this distant moon in another star system has evolved creatures that look essentially the same as earthly creatures, with very minor differences (dogs, horses, birds, rhinoceros-like animals, and so on), not to mention humanoids that are virtually the same as humans here on Earth. That’s quite a coincidence.

Cameron’s conception of technology a hundred years from now was incredibly unimaginative, even by Hollywood standards. For example, the munitions that were supposed to blow up the tree of life looked like they were used in World War II (maybe even World War I). Most of the technology looked primitive, even by today’s standards. The wearable exoskeleton robotic devices were supposed to be futuristic, but these already exist, and are beginning to be deployed. The one advanced technology was the avatar technology itself. But in that sense, Avatar is like the world of the movie AI, where they had human-level cyborgs, but nothing else had changed: AI featured 1980’s cars and coffee makers. As for Avatar, are people still going to use computer screens in a hundred years? Are they going to drive vehicles?

I thought the story and script was unimaginative, one-dimensional, and derivative. The basic theme was “evil corporation rapes noble natives.” And while that is a valid theme, it was done without the least bit of subtlety, complexity, or human ambiguity. The basic story was taken right from Dances with Wolves. And how many (thousands of) times have we seen a final battle scene that comes down to a battle between the hero and the anti-hero that goes through various incredible stages — fighting on a flying airplane, in the trees, on the ground, etc? And (spoiler alert) how predictable was it that the heroine would pull herself free at the last second and save the day?

None of the creatures were especially creative. The flying battles were like Harry Potter’s Quidditch, and the flying birds were derivative of Potter creatures, including mastering flying on the back of big bird creatures. There was some concept of networked intelligence but it was not especially coherent. The philosophy was the basic Hollywood religion about the noble cycle of life.

The movie was fundamentally anti-technology. Yes, it is true, as I pointed out above, that the natives use tools, but these are not the tools we associate with modern technology. And it is true that the Sigourney Weaver character and her band of scientists intend to help the Na’vi with their human technology (much like international aid workers might do today in developing nations), but we never actually see that happen. I got the sense that Cameron was loath to show modern technology doing anything useful. So even when Weaver’s scientist becomes ill, the Na’vi attempt to heal her only with the magical life force of the tree of life.

In Cameron’s world, Nature is always wise and noble, which indeed it can be, but he fails to show its brutal side. The only thing that was brutal, crude, and immoral in the movie was the “advanced” technology. Of course, one could say that it was the user of the technology that was immoral (the evil corporation), but that is the only role for technology in the world of Avatar.

In addition to being evil, the technology of the Avatar world of over 100 years from now is also weaker than nature, so the rhinoceros-like creatures are able to defeat the tanks circa 2100. It was perhaps a satisfying spectacle to watch, but how realistic is that? The movie shows the natural creatures communicating with each other with some kind of inter-species messaging and also showed the tree of life able to remember voices. But it is actually real-world technology that can do those things right now. In the Luddite world of this movie, the natural world should and does conquer the brutish world of technology.

In my view, there is indeed a crudeness to first-industrial-revolution technology. The technology that will emerge in the decades ahead will be altogether different. It will enhance the natural world while it transcends its limitations. Indeed, it is only through the powers of exponentially growing info, bio, and nano technologies that we will be able to overcome the problems created by first-industrial-revolution technologies such as fossil fuels. This idea of technology transcending natural limitations was entirely lost in Cameron’s vision. Technology was just something crude and immoral, something to be overcome, something that Nature does succeed in overcoming.

It was visually pleasing; although even here I thought it could have been better. Some of the movement of the blue natives was not quite right and looked like the unrealistic movement one sees of characters in video games, with jumps that show poor modeling of gravity.

The ending (spoiler alert) was a complete throwaway. The Na’vi defeat the immoral machines and their masters in a big battle, but if this mineral the evil corporation was mining is indeed worth a fortune per ounce, they would presumably come back with a more capable commander. Yet we hear Jake’s voice at the end saying that the mineral is no longer needed. If that’s true, then what was the point of the entire battle?

The Na’vi are presented as the ideal society, but consider how they treat their women. The men get to “pick” their women, and Jake is offered to take his choice once he earns his place in the society. Jake makes the heroine his wife, knowing full well that his life as a Na’vi could be cut off at any moment. And what kind of child would they have? Well, perhaps these complications are too subtle for the simplistic Avatar plot.

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Comments — comments are now closed.

  • BeverlyD on March 6, 2010 3:06 pm

    Wow…You really watched the movie. Kudos to all the distinctions you made. I saw it last week and was going to go again tonight so that I could really see the message. I was assaulted and sensationalized by the medium and maybe this is the real draw to the movie. People are numb and they need to be shocked out of their ordinary lives. Perhaps this is the only great value to the movie. It’s so nice to see there are others awake on this planet that don’t just go along with the cultural drift. nd because it’s the money that is so honored by our nations well that is why others agree it’s AVATAR to win. Great job in writinf your blog.

  • Youarestupid on March 6, 2010 4:03 pm

    We do not have exoskeletens ready to be deployed. This is a horrible review. Jake does not say unobtanium is not needed any more. Also look into things. This movie is full of symbolism which you sure didn’t get.

  • Margie on March 6, 2010 4:30 pm

    Thanks for the thought full review. I just saw the movie — was very pleased with the visuals. I agree with the Dances with Wolves “in space”. Yes, it was derivative of quite a few movies of note. But I thought the flying ‘dragons’ owed a lot to sci-fi writer Anne McCaffrey — especially the parts showing the hatching grounds, the creatures choosing the person and the bonding for life. But basically — I figure — so what. It is a Saturday matinee, fun-for-the-feeble-minded movie, much closer to Star Wars then 2001. Still pretty cool.….

  • ABCD on March 6, 2010 11:53 pm

    And Avatar is the most important contribution to the well being of the human race that has ever been presented to mankind. So important is Avatar, that everything MUST be taken as ABSOLUTE TRUTH. This film MUST be ripped apart because it will brainwash every single life form on the earth! Run for your lives!!!! This movie will comsume the planet by Dec 21st 2012!!! It must be taken literally or your head is going to explode!

    Or…maybe this was a really really fun way to blow a couple hours on a Saturday night.

    Stop reading into this movie so much! It’s a MOVIE!

    Ray…say it with me.…MMMMOOOOVVVVIIIIEEEE

  • Naviblue on March 7, 2010 3:01 am

    We’ll be watching the Oscars at Avatar fan site http://www.Naviblue.com and chatting about it live in the chatroom. Join us during the broadcast!

  • Danila on March 11, 2010 1:47 pm

    What’s you point,ABCD?

    Of course it’s just a movie. The Birth of a Nation is also just a movie.

  • 2bsirius on March 22, 2010 1:19 am

    I would have thought that Kurzweil would have commented in more depth on the transference of consciousness into the avatar, and discussed more the implications of that. But instead he focuses mostly on the exoskeleton robots. I agreed that the plot line was derivative and predictable, but I would have liked him to flesh out [no pun intended] the role of consciousness in the film, which personally I thought was the ONLY intriguing element in Avatar.