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May 20, 2024

How ImageNet, AlexNet and GPUs Changed AI Forever

Posted by in categories: information science, robotics/AI

In 2006, Feifei Li aimed to address the limitations of AI algorithms, which were hampered by small, non-diverse datasets.


And the unbending faith! A behind-the-scenes look at the unlikely ingredients that fueled the 2000s AI boom.

May 20, 2024

Investigating ChatGPT-4’s performance in solving physics problems and its potential implications for education

Posted by in categories: education, physics, robotics/AI

Chat gpt 4 is really excellent in physics work aiding the user very well much like wolfram alpha has done.


Artificial intelligence (AI) technologies have been consistently influencing the progress of education for an extended period, with its impact becoming more significant especially after the launch of ChatGPT-3.5 at the end of November 2022. In the field of physics education, recent research regarding the performance of ChatGPT-3.5 in solving physics problems discovered that its problem-solving abilities were only at the level of novice students, insufficient to cause outstanding alarm in the field of physics education. However, the release of ChatGPT-4 presented substantial improvements in reasoning and conciseness. How does this translate to performance in solving physics problems, and what kind of impact might it have on education?

May 20, 2024

Scientists Awaken Deep Sea Bacteria After 100 Million Years

Posted by in categories: biological, life extension

Year 2020 This holds promise for near infinite lifespans for humans still in the first stages but still very promising for immortality and so much more.


The microbes had survived on trace amounts of oxygen and were able to feed and multiply once revived in the lab.

May 20, 2024

A connectomic study of a petascale fragment of human cerebral cortex

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, neuroscience

We acquired a rapidly preserved human surgical sample from the temporal lobe of the cerebral cortex. We stained a 1 mm3 volume with heavy metals, embedded it in resin, cut more than 5,000 slices at ∼30 nm and imaged these sections using a high-speed multibeam scanning electron microscope. We used computational methods to render the three-dimensional structure containing 57,216 cells, hundreds of millions of neurites and 133.7 million synaptic connections. The 1.4 petabyte electron microscopy volume, the segmented cells, cell parts, blood vessels, myelin, inhibitory and excitatory synapses, and 104 manually proofread cells are available to peruse online. Many interesting and unusual features were evident in this dataset. Glia outnumbered neurons 2:1 and oligodendrocytes were the most common cell type in the volume. Excitatory spiny neurons comprised 69% of the neuronal population, and excitatory synapses also were in the majority (76%). The synaptic drive onto spiny neurons was biased more strongly toward excitation (70%) than was the case for inhibitory interneurons (48%). Despite incompleteness of the automated segmentation caused by split and merge errors, we could automatically generate (and then validate) connections between most of the excitatory and inhibitory neuron types both within and between layers. In studying these neurons we found that deep layer excitatory cell types can be classified into new subsets, based on structural and connectivity differences, and that chandelier interneurons not only innervate excitatory neuron initial segments as previously described, but also each other’s initial segments. Furthermore, among the thousands of weak connections established on each neuron, there exist rarer highly powerful axonal inputs that establish multi-synaptic contacts (up to ∼20 synapses) with target neurons. Our analysis indicates that these strong inputs are specific, and allow small numbers of axons to have an outsized role in the activity of some of their postsynaptic partners.

The authors have declared no competing interest.

May 20, 2024

A Study Suggests We Found Potential Evidence of Dyson Spheres—and Alien Civilizations

Posted by in category: alien life

Although scanning this structure remotely could garner more technological advances I do think we need to consider safeguarding earth aswell.


Could unusual starlight patterns be the key to uncovering these mythical megastructures?

May 20, 2024

People with Rare Longevity Mutation may also be Protected from Cardiovascular Disease

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency, or Laron syndrome, appear to have lower than average risk factors for cardiovascular disease, according to a new study.

A new study highlights possible cardiovascular health advantages in individuals with a rare condition known as growth hormone receptor deficiency (GHRD), also called Laron syndrome.

GHRD, which is characterized by the body’s impaired ability to use its own growth hormone and results in stunted growth, has been linked in mice to a record 40% longevity extension and lower risks for various age-related diseases. However, the risk of cardiovascular disease in individuals with GHRD has remained unclear until now, leading to the speculation that in people, this mouse longevity mutation may actually increase cardiovascular disease.

May 20, 2024

What Your ‘Heart Age’ Says About Your Health

Posted by in category: health

Do you need to know your heart age? A growing crop of tools will estimate it for you.

May 20, 2024

Webb Captures Iconic Horsehead Nebula in Unprecedented Detail

Posted by in categories: materials, space travel

The NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope has captured the sharpest infrared images to date of one of the most distinctive objects in our skies, the Horsehead Nebula. These observations show a part of the iconic nebula in a whole new light, capturing its complexity with unprecedented spatial resolution.

Webb’s new images show part of the sky in the constellation Orion (The Hunter), in the western side of the Orion B molecular cloud. Rising from turbulent waves of dust and gas is the Horsehead Nebula, otherwise known as Barnard 33, which resides roughly 1,300 light-years away.

The nebula formed from a collapsing interstellar cloud of material, and glows because it is illuminated by a nearby hot star. The gas clouds surrounding the Horsehead have already dissipated, but the jutting pillar is made of thick clumps of material that is harder to erode. Astronomers estimate that the Horsehead has about 5 million years left before it too disintegrates. Webb’s new view focuses on the illuminated edge of the top of the nebula’s distinctive dust and gas structure.

May 20, 2024

Dr Roland Roesch — Director, Innovation and Technology Centre, International Renewable Energy Agency

Posted by in categories: business, climatology, economics, engineering, finance, policy, sustainability

Innovation For A Sustainable Global Energy Transformation — Dr. Roland Roesch, Ph.D. — Director, Innovation and Technology Centre, International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)


Dr. Roland Roesch, Ph.D. is Director, Innovation and Technology Centre (IITC), of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA — https://www.irena.org/) where he oversees the Agency’s work on advising member countries in the area of technology status and roadmaps, energy planning, cost and markets and innovation policy frameworks.

Continue reading “Dr Roland Roesch — Director, Innovation and Technology Centre, International Renewable Energy Agency” »

May 20, 2024

Barry Kemp, Egyptologist who dispelled myths about the ‘Christ-like’ pharaoh Akhenaten — obituary

Posted by in category: futurism

Professor Barry Kemp, who has died the day after his 84th birthday, was an eminent Egyptologist who directed the excavations at the site in Middle Egypt known as Amarna.


‘The danger of being an absolute ruler is that no one dares tell you that what you have just decreed is not a good idea’

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