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Oct 29, 2016

Multipurpose Robot Named Leonardo is Your Mars Companion of the Future

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, space

As we continue moving forward in the colonization of Mars, how might we get along with our future Martian robot companions? — B.J. Murphy for Serious Wonder.

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Oct 29, 2016

Tesla Solar

Posted by in categories: solar power, sustainability

The sun provides more than enough energy in just one hour to supply our planet’s energy needs for an entire year. Your home can capture this free, abundant energy source through rooftop solar tiles, turning sunlight into electricity for immediate use or storage in a Powerwall battery.

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Oct 29, 2016

Google’s AI created its own form of encryption

Posted by in categories: encryption, robotics/AI

Just two neural networks passing secret notes without you.

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Oct 29, 2016

This company wants to put a computer in your brain

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

*BREAKING NEWS* This tech company is investing $100 million dollars to put computers inside our brains!

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Oct 29, 2016

Nothing Teaches a Robot Like Another Robot

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

Cloud robotics is changing the way robots learn.

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Oct 29, 2016

Space, the Final Frontier for Cybersecurity? | Chatham House

Posted by in categories: business, governance, government, policy, space, treaties

2016-09-22-space-cyber

“A radical review of cybersecurity in space is needed to avoid potentially catastrophic attacks.”

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Oct 29, 2016

George Lucas Presents Two New Designs For His Beleaguered Museum — By Mark Wilson | Fast Company

Posted by in categories: media & arts, space, space travel

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“After being spurned in Chicago, Lucas’s Museum of Narrative Art is looking for a West Coast home.”

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Oct 29, 2016

A Selection of Recent Research on Exercise and Aging

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health, life extension

Exercise is a good idea if you want to live long enough to see new technologies arrive that could change how we age.


A fair amount of interesting research on the topic of exercise and aging passes by every month. Most is not really worth commenting on here, other than to reinforce the point that there is a very, very large body of evidence to link regular exercise with improved long-term health and reduced mortality. Since I did note a few items worth reading recently, I thought I’d bundle them together for today’s post as just such a reminder. In human studies the evidence for exercise tends to be a matter of correlation more often than causation, but the corresponding animal studies, in which researchers can put individuals into groups by level of exercise and observe the results across the life span of a cohort, leave no doubt as to the benefits provided by regular exercise. The results over the long term remain better than anything a basically healthy individual can obtain from medical science today, say to say, though that statement won’t be true for many more years given the progress being made towards rejuvenation therapies. You can’t exercise your way to ensuring a life span of 100 years, it isn’t that large of an effect, but the benefits that can be realized are available, reliable, and free. It makes sense to take advantage of them.

The high level summary of the present research community consensus on the health benefits of exercise is that it, like many things in health and medicine, appears to have a U-shaped dose-response curve with the 80/20 point somewhere around about or a little above the standard recommendations for half an hour to an hour a day of moderate aerobic exercise. While elite athletes are shown to live a few years longer than the rest of us, it remains unclear as to whether that is due to the large amount of physical exercise or due to the fact that more robust people — who would live longer anyway — tend to have a better shot at succeeding in the world of professional athletics. At the other end of the dose-response curve, the growing use of accelerometers in studies has demonstrated that even modest levels of exercise, such as infrequent gardening or cleaning or walking, have noticeable correlations with health and mortality.

Continue reading “A Selection of Recent Research on Exercise and Aging” »

Oct 29, 2016

A real-world Babel Fish: using neural networks for better translations

Posted by in categories: innovation, robotics/AI

Center for Data Science Professor Kyunghyun Cho talks improving multi-way, multilingual translations.

Although machines can outperform humans in almost any skill set today, there is still one process that they have yet to master: translation. Several students learning a second or third language in particular will have undoubtedly encountered some of the more hilarious results produced by Google (mis)Translate.

But a solution was recently proposed by the Center for Data Science’s very own Kyunghyun Cho. Together with Yoshua Bengio and Orhan Firat, their innovative model — which is the first to handle multi-way, multilingual translations — clinched the runners-up position for best paper at the 2016 Annual Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics.

Continue reading “A real-world Babel Fish: using neural networks for better translations” »

Oct 29, 2016

Brain Controlled Robotic Hand

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

Watch as this brain-controlled robotic hand allows this man to regain his sense of touch.

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