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Jun 20, 2016

Researchers create organic nanowire synaptic transistors that emulate the working principles of biological synapses

Posted by in categories: computing, nanotechnology, quantum physics

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the Pohang University of Science and Technology in Korea has created organic nanowire synaptic transistors that emulate the working principles of biological synapses. As they describe in their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the artificial synapses they have created use much smaller amounts of power than other devices developed thus far and rival that of their biological counterparts.

Scientists are taking multiple paths towards building next generation computers—some are fixated on finding a material to replace silicon, others are working towards building a quantum machine, while still others are busy trying to build something much more like the human mind. A hybrid system of sorts that has organic artificial parts meant to mimic those found in the brain. In this new effort, the team in Korea has reached a new milestone in creating an artificial synapse—one that has very nearly the same power requirements as those inside our skulls.

Up till now, artificial synapses have consumed far more power than human synapses, which researchers have calculated is on the order of 10 femtojoules each time a single one fires. The new synapse created by the team requires just 1.23 femtojoules per event—far lower than anything achieved thus far, and on par with their natural rival. Though it might seem the artificial creations are using less power, they do not perform the same functions just yet, so natural biology is still ahead. Plus there is the issue of transferring information from one neuron to another. The “wires” used by the human body are still much thinner than the metal kind still being used by scientists—still, researchers are gaining.

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Jun 20, 2016

SpaceX lays out a roadmap to getting humans to Mars in a decade

Posted by in categories: Elon Musk, space travel

Elon Musk, the founder of SpaceX, has always had the dream of sending the human race to Mars. Now, thanks to SpaceX’s advancements, that dream is not far off. In an interview with The Washington Post, Musk divulges some new details on his plan to get to Mars.

The first step in his plan is to send an uncrewed spacecraft to Mars as early as 2018. These missions will continue every two years when Earth and Mars are at closest approach supplying rovers and science experiments to the Red Planet, and testing pertinent systems of the spacecrafts.

“Essentially what we’re saying is we’re establishing a cargo route to Mars,” Musk told The Post. “It’s a regular cargo route. You can count on it. It’s going happen every 26 months. Like a train leaving the station.”

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Jun 20, 2016

Part Light, Part Matter: Physicists Create ‘Mixed Matter’ at Room Temperature

Posted by in category: quantum physics

Scientists from the UK used gold to trap photons with a molecule at room temperature. The experiment shows evidence of the quantum nature of light.

It’s a Trap!

A group of physicists from the UK were able to mix light and molecules at room temperature. This phenomenon is called strong coupling. It has been achieved before, but only at very low temperatures. Achieving this at room temperature makes it easier to manipulate the process and to do experiments at lower costs.

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Jun 20, 2016

Canada’s Prime Minister looks super-intense wearing the Microsoft HoloLens holographic goggles

Posted by in category: augmented reality

Justin Trudeau seems to enjoy the Microsoft HoloLens.

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Jun 20, 2016

These 15 electric cars will be here by 2020

Posted by in category: transportation

It won’t be long before you will have your choice of electric cars.

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Jun 20, 2016

Musk: Half of Cars Made in 7 or 8 Years Will Be Driverless

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, transportation

Just another one of Musk’s ambitious predictions, or inevitable truth?

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Jun 20, 2016

Two inventions deal with virtual-reality sickness | KurzweilAI

Posted by in category: virtual reality

virtual-environment-dynamic-field-of-view-modification-

“Columbia Engineering researchers announced earlier this week that they have developed a simple way to reduce VR motion sickness that can be applied to existing consumer VR devices, such as Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, Sony PlayStation VR, Gear VR, and Google Cardboard devices.”

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Jun 19, 2016

‘Within Ten Years 50% of Americans Will Be Chipped’ – Tech Pioneer

Posted by in categories: business, geopolitics, military, neuroscience, transhumanism

An article & short interview on implants with Sputnik:


The US Navy has held talks with “Transhumanist” and presidential candidate Zoltan Istvan, who told Radio Sputnik about the US military’s concerns.

Last week it emerged that US naval officers have held discussions with Zoltan Istvan of the Transhumanist political party, who is also running as a candidate for the US presidency.

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Jun 19, 2016

The black hole jets that ‘punch’ out of their galaxies

Posted by in category: cosmology

Dr Alexander Tchekhovskoy from the University of California, Berkeley and Dr Omer Bromberg from Hebrew University came up with a simulation demonstrating the powerful jets generated by supermassive black holes at the centres of the largest galaxies.

The simulation explains why some black holes burst forth as bright beacons visible across the universe, while others fall apart and never pierce the halo of the galaxy.

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Jun 19, 2016

Genetically enhancing our children could raise interest rates

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, business, economics, genetics, government, neuroscience

Always a trickle down effect on things that improve or change. Just reconfirms and reminds us organically how everything is indeed connected.


Capital tends to have greater value the more skilled and educated the workforce. Anticipating genetically enhanced workers would cause firms to want to invest more now in new equipment and buildings. Many assets, such as real estate and intellectual property, become more valuable the richer a society and so expectations of a much higher economic growth rate would cause companies to spend more buying and developing these assets so that businesses, as well as governments, will wish to borrow more when they realize the potential of human genetic engineering.

Many individuals will reduce their savings rate in anticipation of a future richer society. Today, fear that Social Security won’t survive motivates many Americans to save, but this fear and so this incentive for saving would disappear once genetic engineering for intelligence proves feasible. Furthermore, many citizens would rationally expect future government benefits to senior citizens to increase in a world made richer by genetic engineering and this expectation would reduce the perceived need to save for retirement.

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