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Jan 27, 2023

PET imaging shows greater lung inflammation in e-cigarette users than cigarette smokers

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) users have greater lung inflammation than cigarette smokers and non-smokers, according to a new study published online in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. This study is the first to provide evidence that vaping e-liquids with e-cigarettes creates a unique inflammatory response in the lungs that is different from cigarette smoking.

E-cigarette usage has increased dramatically in the past several years, particularly among adolescents and young adults. While many people assume that e-cigarettes are safer than conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes can cause pulmonary and increase the risk of lung disease. In addition, their long-term safety has not been rigorously evaluated.

This is the first PET study to use a novel radiotracer, 18 F-NOS, to compare lung inflammation between cigarette and users in vivo. Although PET imaging with 18 F-FDG has been used in the past to investigate inflammation in smokers and vapers, its conclusions were limited.

Jan 27, 2023

Researchers identify neurons that ‘learn’ to smell a threat

Posted by in categories: futurism, space

Whether conscious of it or not, when entering a new space, we use our sense of smell to assess whether it is safe or a threat. In fact, for much of the animal kingdom, this ability is necessary for survival and reproduction. Researchers at the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester are finding new clues to how the olfactory sensory system aids in threat assessment and have found neurons that “learn” if a smell is a threat.

“We are trying to understand how animals interact with smell and how that influences their behavior in threatening social and non-social contexts,” said Julian Meeks, Ph.D., principal investigator of the Chemosensation and Social Learning Laboratory. “Our recent research gives us valuable tools to use in our future work and connects specific sets of neurons in our to the memory of threatening smells.”

How the brain responds to a social threat may be guided by smell. In , researchers have identified a specific set of neurons in the accessory olfactory system that can learn the scent of another mouse that is a potential threat. These findings are described in a paper recently published in The Journal of Neuroscience.

Jan 27, 2023

UK: $18.5 Billion wasted on unused Covid supplies | World News | English News | WION

Posted by in category: futurism

The Department of Health has wasted a total of $18.5 Billion on unused Covid supplies. This has prompted heavy criticism from the Whitehall spending watchdog. Watch further to know more.
#uk #covid #wion.

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Jan 27, 2023

ChatGPT can find and fix bugs in computer code

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

ChatGPT, the AI chatbot developed by tech company OpenAI, can find and fix bugs in computer code as well as standard machine learning approaches – and does even better when engaged in conversation.

Dominik Sobania at Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, and his colleagues sought to see how well ChatGPT compared with other AI-powered coding support tools. A number of tools exist that use artificial intelligence to check programming code to ensure there are no mistakes.

Jan 27, 2023

Small study shows promise for antimalarial monoclonal antibody to prevent malaria

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

A monoclonal antibody treatment was found to be safe, well tolerated, and effective in protecting against malaria in a small group of healthy volunteers who were exposed to malaria in a challenge study, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM).

“The study demonstrates the feasibility of using monoclonal antibody therapies to help prevent malarial infection and holds promise for deployment to places where the disease is endemic,” said Kirsten Lyke, MD, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Malaria Vaccine and Challenge Unit in the Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health (CVD) at UMSOM. “This may allow us to revisit eradication efforts.”

There were 241 million malaria cases and 627,000 deaths reported worldwide in 2020 alone, which is a 12 percent increase from 2019. Public health experts contend new strategies are urgently needed to achieve the United Nation’s sustainable development goal of 90 percent reduction in malaria incidence and mortality by 2030. Scientists have tried for decades to develop a highly effective malaria vaccine without much success.

Jan 27, 2023

Elon Musk reiterates his belief that Tesla will ‘be the most valuable company on earth’ amid record quarter for the EV maker

Posted by in categories: business, Elon Musk, sustainability, transportation

Musk also teased that new products are under development, which presumably could be a new car model. Wall Street analysts expect a lower-cost EV that they have dubbed the “Model 2.”

“I should also say that we have other products in development. We’re not going to announce them obviously but they’re very exciting and I think we’ll blow people’s minds when we reveal them,” Musk said.

Other areas of growth for the company include Tesla insurance, which is currently at an annual premium run rate of $300 million. “We’re growing 20% a quarter so it’s growing faster than the growth in our vehicle business,” CFO Zachary Kirkhorn said.

Continue reading “Elon Musk reiterates his belief that Tesla will ‘be the most valuable company on earth’ amid record quarter for the EV maker” »

Jan 27, 2023

How 3 Indian Doctors Pioneered the Use of ORS to Treat Diarrhoea & Saved Millions!

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Way back in 1953, Hemendra Nath Chatterjee first treated 186 patients with an “oral glucose-sodium electrolyte solution”. But it’s widely believed that “racism or the lack of a ‘scientific’ rationale prevented the widespread adoption of his work.” #IndiansInScience #LostTales

Jan 27, 2023

Solar system formed from ‘poorly mixed cake batter,’ isotope research shows

Posted by in categories: chemistry, space

Earth’s potassium arrived by meteoritic delivery service finds new research led by Carnegie’s Nicole Nie and Da Wang. Their work, published in Science, shows that some primitive meteorites contain a different mix of potassium isotopes than those found in other, more-chemically processed meteorites. These results can help elucidate the processes that shaped our solar system and determined the composition of its planets.

“The found in enable stars to manufacture elements using ,” explained Nie, a former Carnegie postdoc now at Caltech. “Each stellar generation seeds the raw material from which subsequent generations are born and we can trace the history of this material across time.”

Some of the material produced in the interiors of stars can be ejected out into space, where it accumulates as a cloud of gas and dust. More than 4.5 billion years ago, one such cloud collapsed in on itself to form our sun.

Jan 27, 2023

Study achieves the coherent manipulation of electron spins in silicon

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

In recent years, many physicists and computer scientists have been working on the development of quantum computing technologies. These technologies are based on qubits, the basic units of quantum information.

In contrast with classical bits, which have a value of 0 or 1, qubits can exist in , so they can have a value of 0 and 1 simultaneously. Qubits can be made of different physical systems, including , (i.e., the spin state of a nucleus), photons, and superconducting circuits.

Electron spins confined in quantum dots (i.e., tiny silicon-based structures) have shown particular promise as qubits, particularly due to their long coherence times, high gate fidelities and compatibility with existing semiconductor manufacturing methods. Coherently controlling multiple , however, can be challenging.

Jan 27, 2023

Quantum physicists determine how to control two quantum light sources rather than one

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

In a new breakthrough, researchers at the University of Copenhagen, in collaboration with Ruhr University Bochum, have solved a problem that has caused quantum researchers headaches for years. The researchers can now control two quantum light sources rather than one. Trivial as it may seem to those uninitiated in quantum, this colossal breakthrough allows researchers to create a phenomenon known as quantum mechanical entanglement. This in turn, opens new doors for companies and others to exploit the technology commercially.

Going from one to two is a minor feat in most contexts. But in the world of , doing so is crucial. For years, researchers around the world have strived to develop stable quantum sources and achieve the phenomenon known as quantum mechanical entanglement—a phenomenon, with nearly sci-fi-like properties, where two light sources can affect each other instantly and potentially across large geographic distances.

Entanglement is the very basis of and central to the development of an efficient quantum computer.

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