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Nov 19, 2018

Space: how far have we gone – and where are we going?

Posted by in categories: government, space travel

Billionaire entrepreneurs are trying to create rockets fit for human travel, while government agencies spend billions furthering their explorations. But we are still a long way off from making our way to the red planet by .

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Nov 19, 2018

Israeli scientists develop implanted organs that won’t be rejected

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

“With our technology, we can engineer any tissue type, and after transplantation we can efficiently regenerate any diseased or injured organ — a heart after a heart attack, a brain after trauma or with Parkinson’s disease, a spinal cord after injury”


Breakthrough development uses a patient’s own stomach cells, cutting the risk of an immune response to implanted organs.

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Nov 19, 2018

Breakthrough neural network paves the way for quantum AI

Posted by in categories: information science, quantum physics, robotics/AI

A team of Italian researchers successfully ran a perceptron algorithm on a real, working quantum computer using IBM’s cloud-access Q Experience system.

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Nov 19, 2018

‘Pinwheel’ star system is beautiful, dangerous and doomed

Posted by in category: futurism

The star system is beautiful, but also dangerous — and likely doomed.

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Nov 19, 2018

NASA Announces Landing Site for Mars 2020 Rover

Posted by in categories: futurism, space travel

JUST IN: Jezero Crater will be the landing site of NASA’s next rover being sent to Mars in 2020. This area, with a history of containing water, may have ancient organic molecules & other potential signs of microbial life from billions of years ago.


NASA has chosen Jezero Crater as the landing site for its upcoming Mars 2020 rover mission after a five year search, during which every available detail of more than 60 candidate locations on the Red Planet was scrutinized and debated by the mission team and the planetary science community.

The rover mission is scheduled to launch in July 2020 as NASA’s next step in exploration of the Red Planet. It will not only seek signs of ancient habitable conditions – and past microbial life — but the rover also will collect rock and soil samples and store them in a cache on the planet’s surface. NASA and ESA (European Space Agency) are studying future mission concepts to retrieve the samples and return them to Earth, so this landing site sets the stage for the next decade of Mars exploration.

Continue reading “NASA Announces Landing Site for Mars 2020 Rover” »

Nov 19, 2018

Researchers have succeeded in creating a fifth state of matter in space

Posted by in category: space

And it could really matter.


Using an unnamed space rocket, a team of German researchers have successfully studied the Bose-Einstein condensate.

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Nov 19, 2018

Where will we land our next Mars rover?

Posted by in category: alien life

Where will NASA land its next Mars rover? Listen at noon ET to get the details from the #Mars2020 mission team as they look at the science exploration possible at this site and how it’ll help answer key questions about the potential for ancient life on Mars.


NASA — National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Triangle-downtriangle-up.

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Nov 19, 2018

Lab-grown ‘mini brains’ produce electrical patterns that resemble those of premature babies

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Promising news: ‘Mini brains’ grown in a dish have spontaneously produced human-like brain waves for the first time — and the electrical patterns look similar to those seen in premature babies.


Structures could help researchers to study the early stages of brain development disorders, including epilepsy.

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Nov 19, 2018

Watch just a few self-driving cars stop traffic jams

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, transportation

What’s one way to prevent a traffic jam? Self-driving cars may have an answer:


Artificial intelligence–powered cars can put the brakes on stop-and-go traffic.

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Nov 19, 2018

Space Station 20th: longest continual timelapse from space

Posted by in categories: habitats, space

Since the very first module Zarya launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome on 20 November 1998, the International Space Station has delivered a whole new perspective on this planet we call home. Join us as we celebrate 20 years of international collaboration and research for the benefit of Earth with our astronaut Alexander Gerst’s longest timelapse yet!

In just under 15 minutes, this clip takes you from Tunisia across Beijing, China and through Australia in two trips around the world. You can follow the Station’s location using the map at the top right-hand-side of the screen alongside annotations on the photos themselves.

This timelapse comprises approximately 21 375 images of Earth all captured by Alexander from the International Space Station and shown 12.5 times faster than actual speed.

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