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Sep 12, 2018

DARPA Wants Brain Interfaces for Able-Bodied Warfighters

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, military, neuroscience

The Next-Generation Nonsurgical Neurotechnology (N3) program will fund research on tech that can transmit high-fidelity signals between the brain and some external machine without requiring that the user be cut open for rewiring or implantation. It hasn’t escaped DARPA’s attention that no-surgery-required brain gear that gives people superpowers may find applications beyond the military. The proof-of-concept tech that comes out of the N3 program may lead to consumer products, says Justin Sanchez, director of DARPA’s Biological Technologies Office. “This will spawn new industries,” he says…


The N3 program will create no-surgery-required neurotech that the general public may also find useful.

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Sep 12, 2018

In ‘Nature’: A nanoscale discovery with big implications

Posted by in categories: nanotechnology, quantum physics, space

A recent discovery by William & Mary and University of Michigan researchers transforms our understanding of one of the most important laws of modern physics. The discovery, published in the journal Nature, has broad implications for science, impacting everything from nanotechnology to our understanding of the solar system.

“This changes everything, even our ideas about planetary formation,” said Mumtaz Qazilbash, associate professor of physics at William & Mary and co-author on the paper. “The full extent of what this means is an important question and, frankly, one I will be continuing to think about.”

Qazilbash and two W&M graduate students, Zhen Xing and Patrick McArdle, were asked by a team of engineers from the University of Michigan to help them test whether Planck’s radiation law, a foundational scientific principle grounded in quantum mechanics, applies at the smallest length scales.

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Sep 12, 2018

Newest robotic simulators bleed and breathe like real humans

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, robotics/AI

These robotic patient simulators are a medical breakthrough that help doctors prepare for real-world experience.

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Sep 12, 2018

MIT taught a neural network how to show its work

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory Intelligence and Decision Technologies Group yesterday unveiled a neural network capable of explaining its reasoning. It’s the latest attack on the black box problem, and a new tool for combating biased AI.

Dubbed the Transparency by Design Network (TbD-net), MIT’s latest machine learning marvel is a neural network designed to answer complex questions about images. The network parses a query by breaking it down into subtasks that are handled by individual modules.

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Sep 12, 2018

It’s Now Possible To Telepathically Communicate with a Drone Swarm

Posted by in categories: computing, drones, neuroscience

You can now control and communicate drone swarms using your mind!


DARPA’s new research in brain-computer interfaces is allowing a pilot to control multiple simulated aircraft at once.

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Sep 12, 2018

Scientists discover three new sea creatures in depths of the Pacific Ocean

Posted by in category: futurism

The new species were discovered in the Atacama Trench and are.

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Sep 12, 2018

One of the Most Famous Degenerative Diseases Affects the Brain in Previously Unknown Ways

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health, neuroscience

An incurable affliction that gradually destroys a person’s ability to walk, speak, and eventually breathe can also deteriorate the mind, new research suggests. People with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are more likely to have other mental and behavioral health problems than people without the condition, the study found.

ALS, also called Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurologic condition that affects some 20,000 Americans at any one time. In ALS, a person’s motor neurons throughout their body and brain steadily die off. These neurons are responsible for helping us carry out voluntary movement.

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Sep 12, 2018

Jupiter’s bizarre magnetic field is unlike anything scientists have ever seen

Posted by in category: space

New data from NASA’s Juno probe show that Jupiter’s magnetic field is unlike any seen around other planets.

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Sep 12, 2018

Graphene enables clock rates in the terahertz range

Posted by in categories: materials, particle physics

Graphene — an ultrathin material consisting of a single layer of interlinked carbon atoms — is considered a promising candidate for the nanoelectronics of the future. In theory, it should allow clock rates up to a thousand times faster than today’s silicon-based electronics. Scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE), in cooperation with the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P), have now shown for the first time that graphene can actually convert electronic signals with frequencies in the gigahertz range — which correspond to today’s clock rates — extremely efficiently into signals with several times higher frequency. The researchers present their results in the scientific journal Nature.

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Sep 12, 2018

Anti-ageing drugs are coming – an expert explains

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

It has recently been suggested that humans could live to 150 by 2020 simply by taking a certain supplement.

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