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Oct 16, 2018

Scientists discover new properties of uranium compounds

Posted by in category: futurism

Scientists from Russia, China and the United States predicted and have now experimentally identified new uranium hydrides, predicting superconductivity for some of them. The results of their study were published in Science Advances.

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Oct 16, 2018

Coalition says new autism guidelines won’t affect NDIS access

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health, neuroscience

Fletcher told the ABC the guidelines were developed in consultation with people living with autism, researchers and doctors, and had been approved by the National Health and Medical Research Council.

“It does not change what the NDIS does and indeed it may well be that there are people who, today, would not be diagnosed who will be diagnosed,” he said. “That will be a judgment for clinicians and medical profession and the NDIS will continue to do what it does, which is make an assessment of the impairment that somebody suffers as a result of a disability. Is it likely to be permanent and lifelong? Is it significant? What impact does it have on the functioning?”

Dr Wenn Lawson, the co-chair of the Australian Autism Research Council, said a consistent assessment and diagnosis process for autism meant people would be able to access more appropriate supports.

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Oct 16, 2018

Twenty-five years of using microlensing to study dark matter

Posted by in category: cosmology

The impact of gravitational-microlensing observations from 1993.

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Oct 16, 2018

All in the family: Kin of gravitational wave source discovered

Posted by in categories: physics, space

On October 16, 2017, an international group of astronomers and physicists excitedly reported the first simultaneous detection of light and gravitational waves from the same source—a merger of two neutron stars. Now, a team that includes several University of Maryland astronomers has identified a direct relative of that historic event.

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Oct 16, 2018

Is age an illness?

Posted by in category: futurism

We can’t all be Dorian Gray, Father time (and natural selection) comes for us all.

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Oct 16, 2018

Stunning new sea slug species look just like seaweed

Posted by in category: food

“This may be the best example of an animal masquerading as a plant that we have,” biologist Nicholas Paul, an expert on seaweed and algae at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast, said in an email. He wasn’t involved with the new study.

The new species exclusively feed on the seaweed genus Caulerpa and are found throughout the Pacific, including Malaysia, Australia, Guam, and the Philippines. Humans consider the algae’s caviar-like bulbs, called sea grapes, a delicacy—but few sea creatures dare eat the stuff, making them highly invasive. Thanks to the global aquarium trade, the algae has invaded waters from the Mediterranean to Japan.

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Oct 16, 2018

MIT Knows That AI Is The Future

Posted by in categories: biological, chemistry, robotics/AI

MIT has launched the Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, a $1 billion center dedicated to “reshaping its academic program” around AI. The idea, said MIT president L. Rafael Reif, is to use AI, machine learning and data science with other academic disciplines to “educate the bilinguals of the future,” defining bilingual as those working in biology, chemistry, politics, history and linguistics with computing skills that can be used in their field.

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Oct 16, 2018

Pepper the robot tells MPs about artificial intelligence

Posted by in categories: education, robotics/AI

‘My name is Pepper,’ robot tells MPs

Jump to media player Pepper the robot answers questions from MPs on the education select committee about helping to care for older people.

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Oct 16, 2018

The Nature of Indefinite Life Extension in Context of Immanuel Kant’s Insights on Ethics and Duty

Posted by in categories: ethics, futurism, life extension, philosophy

Is working to pioneer the full scope of everything that exists a duty? I have been contemplating aspects of that question for some years now. Here I move in the direction of articulating its nature and making the case by drawing out correlations with life extension and Immanuel Kant’s thoughts in The Metaphysical Elements of Ethics.

“IV. What are the Ends which are also Duties? They are: A. Our own perfection, B. Happiness of others.”

His notion of “categorical imperative” is that of a universally applicable, non-contradictory, absolute necessity which everyone can use pure practical reason to understand without it needing to be experienced or taught to them.

He says that “ethics may also be defined as the system of the ends of the pure practical reason.”

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Oct 16, 2018

Physics: Not everything is where it seems to be

Posted by in categories: particle physics, quantum physics, space

Scientists at TU Wien, the University of Innsbruck and the ÖAW have for the first time demonstrated a wave effect that can lead to measurement errors in the optical position estimation of objects. The work now published in Nature Physics could have consequences for optical microscopy and optical astronomy, but could also play a role in position measurements using sound, radar, or gravitational waves.

With modern optical imaging techniques, the position of objects can be measured with a precision that reaches a few nanometers. These techniques are used in the laboratory, for example, to determine the position of atoms in quantum experiments.

“We want to know the position of our quantum bits very precisely so that we can manipulate and measure them with laser beams,” explains Gabriel Araneda from the Department of Experimental Physics at the University of Innsbruck.

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