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Feb 20, 2024

It’s not all about neurons: A new avenue for treating neurodegeneration, injury

Posted by in categories: chemistry, neuroscience

While supporting actors are often overlooked, without their contribution, a story’s main characters would lose context and resort to isolated monologues.

The same is true for neurons — the top-billing stars of cognition — when firing in the brain. Without cells called glia, which form the bulk of brain matter, neurons would stop communicating with each other, as seen in neurodegeneration. These supporting glial cells play countless critical roles in the nervous system such as maintaining the chemical environment of neurons and modulating their activity.

Although neurons still rightfully garner A-lister attention when it comes to developing brain therapies, Jeffrey Goldberg, MD, PhD, professor and chair of ophthalmology and the Blumenkranz Smead Professor, believes a young, underexplored class of therapies called gliotherapeutics, which target and harness glia, will ultimately provide important new directions for treatment.

Feb 20, 2024

AGE REVERSAL —29.5 Years!! 7 Potential Benefits Of GDF11

Posted by in category: life extension

Ok, kids.


Steve Perry of GDF11Rejuvenation presents the seven main mechanisms of action of GDF11 and his own age reversal case in this clip.

Continue reading “AGE REVERSAL —29.5 Years!! 7 Potential Benefits Of GDF11” »

Feb 20, 2024

Galactic Symphony: The Oscillating Wonders of the Radcliffe Wave

Posted by in categories: mapping, space

“It’s the largest coherent structure that we know of, and it’s really, really close to us,” said study co-author, Dr. Catherine Zucker.


A recent study published in Nature investigates further evidence that a gaseous cloud both looks and behaves like an oscillating ocean wave, giving birth to new stars as it traverses the Milky Way Galaxy, which has since been dubbed the Radcliffe Wave. This study was conducted by an international team of researchers led by the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian and holds the potential to help astronomers better understand the beautiful and fascinating aspects of our cosmos.

Image obtained from an animation of the Radcliffe Wave with our Sun (yellow dot). (Credit: Ralf Konietzka, Alyssa Goodman, and WorldWide Telescope)

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Feb 20, 2024

The doctor behind the next big thing in cancer treatment

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics

Finding a cure for cancer is a motivating force for many an aspiring doctor. Few get anywhere close to pursuing that goal. Among them is Dr. Catherine Wu, an oncologist at Boston’s Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, who has had cancer in her sights since second grade, when a teacher asked her and her classmates what they wanted to be when they grew up.

“That’s when there was a lot of coverage on the war on cancer,” she said. “I think I drew a picture of a cloud, probably a rainbow and drew a picture of (me) like, making a cure for cancer or something like that.”

That childhood scribble was prescient. Wu’s research has laid the scientific foundation for the development of cancer vaccines tailored to the genetic makeup of an individual’s tumor. It’s a strategy looking increasingly promising for some hard-to-treat cancers such as melanoma and pancreatic cancer, according to the results of early-stage trials, and may ultimately be widely applicable to many of the 200 or so forms of cancer.

Feb 20, 2024

New epigenetic clocks could reinvent how we measure age

Posted by in categories: biological, genetics, life extension

New models predict biological age more robustly by pinpointing different age-related changes and distinguishing between cause and effect.

Feb 20, 2024

Genetic risk prediction for 10 chronic diseases moves closer to the clinic

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics

As part of a nationwide collaboration, Broad Clinical Labs researchers have optimized 10 polygenic scores for use in clinical research as part of a study on how to implement genetic risk prediction for patients.

Feb 20, 2024

Will AI companions help or hurt the “loneliness epidemic”?

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

Can you make friends with a robot?

“To study this, we asked 387 participants about their usage of AI, as well as their general experience of social connection and support.”

Continue reading “Will AI companions help or hurt the ‘loneliness epidemic’?” »

Feb 20, 2024

Terahertz biosensor detects skin cancer with remarkable accuracy, advancing new era of early detection

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, engineering

Researchers have developed a revolutionary biosensor using terahertz (THz) waves that can detect skin cancer with exceptional sensitivity, potentially paving the way for earlier and easier diagnoses. Published in IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, the study presents a significant advancement in early cancer detection, thanks to the collaboration of multidisciplinary teams from Queen Mary University of London and the University of Glasgow.

“Traditional methods for detecting skin cancer often involve expensive, time-consuming, CT, PET scans and invasive higher frequencies technologies,” explains Dr. Shohreh Nourinovin, Postdoctoral Research Associate at Queen Mary’s School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, and the study’s first author. “Our biosensor offers a non-invasive and highly efficient solution, leveraging the unique properties of THz waves—a type of radiation with lower energy than X-rays, thus safe for humans—to detect subtle changes in cell characteristics.”

The key innovation lies in the biosensor’s design. Featuring tiny, asymmetric resonators on a flexible substrate, it can detect subtle changes in the properties of cells. Unlike traditional methods that rely solely on , this device analyzes a combination of parameters, including , transmission magnitude, and a value called “full width at half maximum” (FWHM). This comprehensive approach provides a richer picture of the tissue, allowing for more accurate differentiation between healthy and cancerous cells and to measure malignancy degree of the tissue.

Feb 20, 2024

Gene Therapy in Mice Holds Promise for ALS and Dementia

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, neuroscience

Neuroresearchers at Macquarie University in Australia say they have developed a single-dose genetic medicine that has halted the progression of both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in mice. The team, which believes its approach may even offer the potential to reverse some of the effects of the fatal diseases, thinks it may also hold opportunities for treating more common forms of dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

The new treatment, dubbed CTx1000, targets pathological build-ups of the protein TDP-43 in cells in the brain and spinal cord, which has been associated with ALS, FTD, and other forms of dementia. The scientists, led by Lars Ittner, PhD, hope to see CTx1000 begin human clinical trials in as little as two years. Their study “Targeting 14–3-3?-mediated TDP-43 pathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia mice” appears in Neuron.

“Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are characterized by cytoplasmic deposition of the nuclear TAR-binding protein 43 (TDP-43). Although cytoplasmic re-localization of TDP-43 is a key event in the pathogenesis of ALS/FTD, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we identified a non-canonical interaction between 14–3-3θ and TDP-43, which regulates nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling,” wrote the investigators.

Feb 20, 2024

New Malicious PyPI Packages Caught Using Covert Side-Loading Tactics

Posted by in category: security

Malicious packages lurking in open-source repositories. Discover how DLL side-loading is the latest technique used to evade security software.

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