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Apr 28, 2019

The future of dental cleaning? Biofilm-busting micro-robots impress in precision cleaning trials

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, robotics/AI

An army of tiny robots scuttling about inside your mouth cleaning your teeth. It’s a disquieting thought, and yet it might be one of the most effective ways to deal with the sticky bacterial biofilms that coat our choppers – as well as water pipes, catheters and other tough-to-clean items.

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Apr 28, 2019

Cell injection helps restoration of lost muscle mass in mice

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Anyone who’s been laid up for an extended period due to illness or injury will know how difficult it can be to get moving again. Long-term immobility can see a loss of muscle mass that can be hard to regain, especially for the elderly. In research on mice, a team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found that the injection of a type of cells known to promote blood vessel growth helps accelerate to restoration of muscle mass lost due to inactivity.

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Apr 28, 2019

Extra tough supercapacitor keeps charge after 40 hammer strikes

Posted by in category: electronics

Dropping electronics can seriously damage their batteries. A device that can stand up to a car crash could change that.

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Apr 28, 2019

The Scientific Reason Why Your Dog Might Secretly Love to Watch TV

Posted by in category: electronics

Secret Life of Pets, anyone?

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Apr 28, 2019

Fear the Man in the Middle? This company wants to sell quantum key distribution

Posted by in categories: futurism, quantum physics

The future of VPNs may be fighting quanta with quanta.

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Apr 28, 2019

Persistence of Long-Term Memory in Vitrified and Revived Caenorhabditis elegans

Posted by in category: life extension

Rejuvenation ResearchVol. 18, No. 5Original ArticlesOpen Access Open Access license Persistence of Long-Term Memory in Vitrified and Revived Caenorhabditis elegans Natasha Vita-More and Daniel Barranco Natasha Vita-MoreAlcor Research Center (ARC), Alcor Life Extension Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona. U…

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Apr 28, 2019

Tilly Lockey — the real life Alita: Battle Angel

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, transhumanism

Tilly is the real life Alita. She uses her bionic arms as a sign of strength 🙌 www.openbionics.com/alita

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Apr 28, 2019

Success in first phase of human trials for colorectal cancer vaccine

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Positive early results from the first phase of human testing for a unique colorectal cancer vaccine are proving promising. A newly published study outlining the Phase I trial results suggests the vaccine is safe, and stimulates immune activation, paving the way for larger human trials.

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Apr 28, 2019

Machine learning expands to help predict and characterize earthquakes

Posted by in categories: information science, robotics/AI

In a focus section published in the journal Seismological Research Letters, researchers describe how they are using machine learning methods to hone predictions of seismic activity, identify earthquake centers, characterize different types of seismic waves and distinguish seismic activity from other kinds of ground “noise.”

Machine learning refers to a set of algorithms and models that allow computers to identify and extract patterns of information from large data sets. Machine learning methods often discover these patterns from the data themselves, without reference to the real-world, physical mechanisms represented by the data. The methods have been used successfully on problems such as digital image and speech recognition, among other applications.

More seismologists are using the methods, driven by “the increasing size of seismic data sets, improvements in computational power, new algorithms and architecture and the availability of easy-to-use open source machine learning frameworks,” write focus section editors Karianne Bergen of Harvard University, Ting Cheng of Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Zefeng Li of Caltech.

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Apr 28, 2019

North Korea’s 2017 bomb test set off later earthquakes, new analysis finds

Posted by in categories: existential risks, military, physics

Using newly refined analysis methods, scientists have discovered that a North Korean nuclear bomb test last fall set off aftershocks over a period of eight months. The shocks, which occurred on a previously unmapped nearby fault, are a window into both the physics of nuclear explosions, and how natural earthquakes can be triggered. The findings are described in two papers just published online in the journal Seismological Research Letters.

The September 3, 2017 underground test was North Korea’s sixth, and by far largest yet, yielding some 250 kilotons, or about 17 times the size of the bomb that destroyed Hiroshima. Many experts believe the device was a hydrogen bomb—if true, a significant advance from cruder atomic devices the regime previously exploded. The explosion itself produced a magnitude 6.3 earthquake. This was followed 8.5 minutes later by a magnitude 4 quake, apparently created when an area above the test site on the country’s Mt. Mantap collapsed into an underground cavity occupied by the bomb.

The test and collapse were picked up by seismometers around the world and widely reported at the time. But later, without fanfare, seismic stations run by China, South Korea and the United States picked up 10 smaller shocks, all apparently scattered within 5 or 10 kilometers around the test site. The first two came on Sept. 23, 2017; the most recent was April 22, 2018. Scientists assumed the bomb had shaken up the earth, and it was taking a while to settle back down. “It’s not likely that there would be so many events in that small area over a small period of time,” said the lead author of one of the studies, Won-Young Kim, a seismologist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. “These are probably triggered due to the explosion.”

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