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Jan 22, 2019

NASA will attempt to knock an asteroid out of orbit for the first time in 2022

Posted by in categories: asteroid/comet impacts, existential risks

  • If an asteroid were to head towards Earth in the foreseeable future, we would be quite defenceless.
  • To change that, NASA has approved a mission to throw a “small” asteroid off course in October 2022.
  • The aim of the project is to establish whether we can protect our planet from a future asteroid impact.

If an asteroid were to head towards Earth, we would be quite defenceless as we have not successfully developed a method that could reduce the impact of — or entirely avert — a devastating collision.

However, that may be about to change. NASA has approved a project called the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART), the aim of which is to throw a “small” asteroid off course in October 2022.

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Jan 22, 2019

How Close are We to Achieving Immortality?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Over the past 100 hundred years, the average human lifespan has increased dramatically, thanks to exponential advancements in science and technology. While living to 80, 90, and even 100 is a possibility, humans have long been in search of the ultimate discovery – immortality.

In order to achieve immortality, scientists have identified four key issues that must be overcome. These include telomere shortening, chronological aging, oxidative stress, and glycation. If these could be drastically reduced or even eliminated, immortality may just be in our reach. However, there are some promising technologies that are prolonging the human lifespan right now, and could eventually lead us to immortality.

It is definitely a creepy a concept to think about, but studies have shown that regular blood transfusions sourced can extend the human lifespan by 10–20 years. Scientists have found that a protein called GDF11 is very common in the blood of young mice, and has been shown to increase skeletal muscle and increase heart strength. This protein has been deemed to have anti-aging properties, making it a promising technology in extending human lifespan.

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Jan 22, 2019

Who was Lev Landau?

Posted by in category: futurism

Soviet physicist Lev Landau is being honoured with a Google Doodle on what would have been his 111th birthday.

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Jan 22, 2019

New insight into cell membranes could improve drug testing and design

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry

Research at the University of Arkansas on membrane proteins could lead to better development and testing of drugs. Chemistry researchers studied a type of membrane protein that expels drugs from a cell, contributing to drug resistance. They found that the lipid composition of the cell membrane has an effect on the behavior of these proteins, which should be taken into account when testing drugs that target membrane proteins. Their results are available open-access in the journal ACS Central Science.

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Jan 22, 2019

This artificial intelligence teaches robots to walk—by creating custom obstacle courses

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

Open-ended style of learning does better than traditional methods.

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Jan 22, 2019

Here’s How A Soldier’s Face Was Rebuilt 200 Years After He Lost A Saber Fight

Posted by in category: futurism

“It is a sad story, but unfortunately it is also the story of hundreds of thousands of young soldiers,” said one archaeologist.

By Dan Vergano

BuzzFeed News Reporter

Continue reading “Here’s How A Soldier’s Face Was Rebuilt 200 Years After He Lost A Saber Fight” »

Jan 22, 2019

New Research Has Revealed That Major Earthquakes Are Often Preceded By ‘Silent Slips’

Posted by in category: futurism

Scientists at Oregon State University have determined why foreshocks are such common indicators of large and deadly earthquakes.

Scientists involved in groundbreaking new research at Oregon State University have determined that major earthquakes are often preceded by “silent slips” and have finally discovered why foreshocks are common indicators of large and deadly earthquakes.

According to Oregon Live, major earthquakes normally follow “shallow mantle creep” and “seismic swarms,” and researchers are much clearer in their understanding now of the “silent slip,” which is what happens when different sections of the Earth’s crust can be observed shifting along the fault line. However, when this occurs, no seismic activity is ever detected, which has been confusing to researchers in the past.

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Jan 22, 2019

Famous freak wave recreated in laboratory mirrors Hokusai’s ‘Great Wave’

Posted by in category: futurism

A team of researchers based at the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh have recreated for the first time the famous Draupner freak wave measured in the North Sea in 1995.

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Jan 22, 2019

An entangled atom-light state realizes a paradoxical thought experiment

Posted by in categories: particle physics, quantum physics

An old thought experiment now appears in a new light. In 1935 Erwin Schrödinger formulated a thought experiment designed to capture the paradoxical nature of quantum physics. A group of researchers led by Gerhard Rempe, Director of the Department of Quantum Dynamics at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, has now realized an optical version of Schrödinger’s thought experiment in the laboratory. In this instance, pulses of laser light play the role of the cat. The insights gained from the project open up new prospects for enhanced control of optical states, that can in the future be used for quantum communications.

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Jan 22, 2019

Airbus wants to reinvent aircraft design with quantum computing challenge

Posted by in categories: computing, particle physics, quantum physics, transportation

Aeronautics giant Airbus today announced that it is creating a global competition to encourage developers to find ways quantum computing can be applied to aircraft design.

Quantum computing is one of many next-generation computing architectures being explored as engineers worry that traditional computing is reaching its physical limits.

Computers today process information using bits, either 0s or 1s, stored in electrical circuits made up of transistors. Quantum computers harness the power of quantum systems, such as atoms that can simultaneously exist in multiple states and can be used as “quantum bits” or “qubits.” These can theoretically handle far more complex calculations.

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