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Jul 12, 2016

Blood of world’s oldest woman hints at limits of life

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

This is from 2014 but is getting posted around the past couple of days.

““It’s estimated that we’re born with around 20,000 blood stem cells, and at any one time, around 1000 are simultaneously active to replenish blood,” says Holstege. During life, the number of active stem cells shrinks, she says, and their telomeres shorten to the point at which they die –”


She lived to 115, but a study of Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper’s blood hints at factors limiting lifespan.

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Jul 11, 2016

How To Become Immortal — By The People Who Think You Can

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Amazing!! More time to learn, evolve, love, & explore the world…


A sprawling facility called Timeship in Texas will host 50,000 frozen dead people with one goal — to become the human race’s first immortals.

Activist Saul Kent — one of the minds behind it — is such a passionate believer in ‘cryogenics’ that he froze his own mother’s head in 1988 after her death.

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Jul 11, 2016

Micron sized onchip quantum dot lasers will enable faster communication and computing

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Micron sized onchip making printing and communication faster.


Researchers designed subwavelength micro-disk lasers (MDLs) as small as 1μm in diameter on exact (001) silicon, using colloidal lithography (dispersing silica colloidal beads as hard masks before etching the prepared QD material layers). Micron sized lasers are 1,000 times shorter in length, and 1 million times smaller than current onchip lasers.

A group of scientists from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology; the University of California, Santa Barbara; Sandia National Laboratories and Harvard University were able to fabricate tiny lasers directly on silicon — a huge breakthrough for the semiconductor industry and well beyond.

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Jul 11, 2016

New framework finds a better way to map complex networks

Posted by in category: military

Nice.


DARPA-funded research finds even obscure patterns that can be applied to better understand anything from military logistics to social media activity to air traffic.

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Jul 11, 2016

Germs add ripples to make ‘groovy’ graphene

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, engineering, nanotechnology, particle physics

Graphene, a two-dimensional wonder-material composed of a single layer of carbon atoms linked in a hexagonal chicken-wire pattern, has attracted intense interest for its phenomenal ability to conduct electricity. Now University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have used rod-shaped bacteria — precisely aligned in an electric field, then vacuum-shrunk under a graphene sheet — to introduce nanoscale ripples in the material, causing it to conduct electrons differently in perpendicular directions.

The resulting material, sort of a graphene nano-corduroy, can be applied to a silicon chip and may add to graphene’s almost limitless potential in electronics and nanotechnology. The finding is reported in the journal ACS Nano.

“The current across the graphene wrinkles is less than the current along them,” says Vikas Berry, associate professor and interim head of chemical engineering at UIC, who led the research.

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Jul 11, 2016

Russia, China Agree On Long-Range, Widebody Airliner Partnership

Posted by in category: transportation

The program will be managed by a specially formed company to be owned equally by the Chinese and Russian state manufacturers.

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Jul 11, 2016

Russia Offers India Nuclear Aircraft Carrier

Posted by in categories: futurism, military

NEW DELHI — Russia has offered its nuclear aircraft carrier, dubbed “Storm,” to India for purchase, a senior Indian Navy official said. The offer comes as India and the US discuss the transfer of technology for India’s future nuclear aircraft carrier, the INS Vishal.

A diplomat with the Russian Embassy confirmed that a Russian team visiting India last week made the offer.

Krylov State Research Center (KSRC), a Russian shipbuilding research and development institute, is designing the carrier, also known as Shtorm or Project 23000E.

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Jul 11, 2016

Atomic bits despite zero-point energy? Jülich scientists explore novel ways of developing stable nanomagnets

Posted by in categories: computing, mobile phones, nanotechnology, particle physics, quantum physics

Stable nanomagnets that ultimately improves data storage on the smallest of devices.


Abstract: So-called “zero-point energy” is a term familiar to some cinema lovers or series fans; in the fictional world of animated films such as “The Incredibles” or the TV series “Stargate Atlantis”, it denotes a powerful and virtually inexhaustible energy source. Whether it could ever be used as such is arguable. Scientists at Jülich have now found out that it plays an important role in the stability of nanomagnets. These are of great technical interest for the magnetic storage of data, but so far have never been sufficiently stable. Researchers are now pointing the way to making it possible to produce nanomagnets with low zero-point energy and thus a higher degree of stability (Nano Letters, DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b01344).

Since the 1970s, the number of components in computer chips has doubled every one to two years, their size diminishing. This development has made the production of small, powerful computers such as smart phones possible for the first time. In the meantime, many components are only about as big as a virus and the miniaturization process has slowed down. This is because below approximately a nanometre, a billionth of a meter in size, quantum effects come into play. They make it harder, for example, to stabilise magnetic moments. Researchers worldwide are looking for suitable materials for magnetically stable nanomagnets so that data can be stored safely in the smallest of spaces.

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Jul 11, 2016

Entanglement : Chaos

Posted by in category: quantum physics

I reported on this 3 weeks ago; however, here is a newer article on the quantum entanglement chaos. This article highlights Google’s involvement.


Researchers at UCSB blur the line between classical and quantum physics by connecting chaos and entanglement.

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Jul 11, 2016

Manoj Saxena talks Artificial Intelligence with Gigaom

Posted by in categories: finance, health, robotics/AI, security

Nice chime on QC.


Manoj Saxena is the executive chairman of CognitiveScale and a founding managing director of The Entrepreneurs’ Fund IV (TEF), a $100m seed fund focused exclusively on the cognitive computing space.

Saxena is also the chairman of Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, San Antonio branch and Chairman, SparkCognition an Austin based cognitive security and safety analytics company.

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