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Nov 14, 2019

Glaxo Wants to Look Inside Your Gut to Discover New Vaccines

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

GlaxoSmithKline Plc is exploring the trillions of microbes that inhabit the gut in pursuit of novel ways to prevent some of the world’s most common ailments.

Nov 14, 2019

🔴 MAGNETO-TOROIDAL FIELD shown w/ new formulation

Posted by in category: bitcoin

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Nov 14, 2019

There’s battle lines being drawn Nobody’s right if everybody’s wrong Young people speaking their minds Getting so much resistance from behind

Posted by in category: futurism

There’s battle lines being drawn.

Nobody’s right if everybody’s wrong.
Young people speaking their minds
Getting so much resistance from behind

It’s time we stop, hey, what’s that sound.
Everybody look what’s going down ”

Nov 14, 2019

Landmark Summits Reveal the Future of National Economies

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, economics, finance, governance, life extension, policy, robotics/AI

Deep Knowledge Group is delighted to have supported and participated in the landmark International Longevity Policy and Governance and AI for Longevity Summits that took place on November 12th at King’s College London, which gathered an unprecedented density and diversity of speakers and panelists at the intersection of Longevity, AI, Policy and Finance. The summits were organized by Longevity International UK and the AI Longevity Consortium at King’s College London, with the strategic support of Deep Knowledge Group, Aging Analytics Agency, Ageing Research at King’s (ARK) and the Biogerontology Research Foundation. Together they managed to attract the interest of major financial corporations, insurance companies, investment banks, Pharma and Tech corporations, and representatives of international governmental bodies, organisations and embassies, as well as leading media, and featured presentations and panel discussions from top executives and directors of Prudential, Barclays Business UK, HSBC, AXA, L&G, Longevity. Capital, Longevity Vision Fund, Juvenescence, the UK Office of AI, Microsoft, NVIDIA, Babylon Health, Huawei Europe, Insilico Medicine, Longevity International UK, the Longevity AI Consortium and others.


November 14, 2019, London, UK: Deep Knowledge Group executives Dmitry Kaminksiy and Eric Kihlstrom spoke at a landmark one-day event held yesterday at King’s College London with the strategic support Deep Knowledge Group. The event united two Longevity-themed summits under the shared strategic agenda of enabling a paradigm shift from treatment to prevention and from prevention to Precision Health via the synergistic efforts of science, industry, AI, policy and governance, to enable the UK to become an international leader in Healthy Longevity.

Nov 14, 2019

Ejected Star: How fast is fast?

Posted by in categories: astronomy, science, space
The fastest man-made object pales in comparison to a Hills ejection

Earlier today, Genevieve O’Hagan updated Lifeboat readers on this week’s momentous event in Astronomy. At least, I find it fascinating—and so, I wish to add perspective…

30 years ago, astronomer Jack Hills demonstrated the math behind what has become known as the “Hills Mechanism”. Until this week, the event that he described had never been observed.* But his peer astronomers agreed that the physics and math should make it possible…

Hills explained that under these conditions, a star might be accelerated to incredible speeds — and might be even flung out of its galaxy:

  • Suppose that a binary star passes close to a black hole, like the one at the center of our galaxy
  • The pair of self-orbiting stars is caught up in the gravity well of a black hole, but not sucked in

If conditions are right, one star ends up orbiting the back hole while the other is jettisoned at incredible speed, yet holding onto its mass and shape. All that energy comes from the gravity of the black hole and the former momentum of the captured star. [20 sec animation] [continue below]

This week, astronomers found clear evidence of this amazing event and traced it back to our galactic center: Five million years ago — as our ancestors learned to walk upright — a star that passed close to the massive black hole at The Milky Way center was flung away at a staggering 6 million Kmh. It is traveling so fast, that it is no longer bound to our galaxy or galactic cluster. It is headed out of the galaxy.

  • Rifle Bullet: Can exceed Mach 3 (2,300 mph)
  • Apollo Rocket: Reached 25,000 mph; Earth escape velocity.
  • Juno Probe: 165,000 mph, a record prior to 2019. (It used Jupiter’s gravity to accelerate)
  • Parker Probe: 213,000 mph (Nov 2019), but will soon reach 430,000 in a tight arc around the Sun

Nov 14, 2019

Uncovering the Missing Secrets of Magnetism Exploring the nature of Magnetism, with regards to the true model of atomic geometry and field mechanics

Posted by in category: futurism

Academia.edu is a platform for academics to share research papers.

Nov 14, 2019

Highly processed food has been linked to cancer

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food

Read more

Nov 14, 2019

NASA astronaut on ISS ‘watched by Space Force craft’ during walk outside station

Posted by in category: space

Footage has since emerged capturing the US Space Force craft “following” the astronauts in the sky, conspiracists have claimed.

Nov 14, 2019

Superfast star found leaving Milky Way at 1,700km per second

Posted by in category: cosmology

Astronomers say S5-HVs1 ventured close to supermassive black hole before being ejected.

Nov 14, 2019

Nuclear Fantasies

Posted by in category: cosmology

Neutron stars cannot exist.

“The sky was clear—remarkably clear—and the twinkling of all the stars seemed to be but throbs of one body, timed by a common pulse.” —Thomas Hardy.

On June 13, 2012 NASA launched the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) on a mission to study X-rays in what are thought to be the remnants of supernova explosions, called pulsars. NuStar joins other X-ray space telescopes like Chandra and XMM-Newton, except that it is capable of focusing X-rays to a sharp point, enabling it to “see” energies up to 79,000 electron-volts. That capability makes it more than 100 times more powerful than the other observatories.