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Jan 11, 2016

How quantum computation will be a goldmine for the financial world

Posted by in categories: finance, quantum physics

This article just posted today. Great news; the author did reference the risks that we face with our information, etc. as it relates with countries like Russia and China who are investing in Quantum.


The impact of quantum computation on the financial markets will be direct and swift, and introduces new highs and new lows, opening a playing field of near limitless potential.

Continue reading “How quantum computation will be a goldmine for the financial world” »

Jan 11, 2016

How photonics can reshape the spectrum of light, and rehabilitate Edison’s light bulb along the way

Posted by in category: innovation

Traditional light bulbs, thought to be well on their way to oblivion, may receive a reprieve thanks to a technological breakthrough.

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Jan 11, 2016

Human-Animal Chimera

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

What do you think of this new idea?


Flying in the face of a funding ban, research centers move ahead with developing human-animal chimeras.

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Jan 11, 2016

Teslasuit lets virtual reality reach out and touch you

Posted by in category: virtual reality

This looks fascinating!


The senses of sight and hearing are immersed in virtual reality, but what about touch? The Teslasuit hopes to let you feel things in virtual worlds.

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Jan 11, 2016

Audi building 3D printed rover to drive across the Moon

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, space

As part of of the Google Lunar X Prize competition, Audi and Part Time Scientists have teamed up to 3D print a rover capable of landing on the moon’s surface, and traversing at least 500 meters thanks to metal 3D printing technology.

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Jan 11, 2016

Rumors Are Flying That We Finally Found Gravitational Waves

Posted by in category: physics

Excited rumors began circulating on Twitter this morning that a major experiment designed to hunt for gravitational waves —ripples in the fabric of spacetime first predicted by Albert Einstein—has observed them directly for the very first time. If confirmed, this would be one of the most significant physics discoveries of the last century.

Move a large mass very suddenly—or have two massive objects suddenly collide, or a supernova explode—and you would create ripples in space-time, much like tossing a stone in a still pond. The more massive the object, the more it will churn the surrounding spacetime, and the stronger the gravitational waves it should produce. Einstein predicted their existence in his general theory of relativity back in 1915, but he thought it would never be possible to test that prediction.

LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) is one of several experiments designed to hunt for these elusive ripples, and with its latest upgrade to Advanced LIGO, completed last year, it has the best chance of doing so. In fact, it topped our list of physics stories to watch in 2016.

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Jan 11, 2016

Pluto image reveals strange slug-like object

Posted by in category: space

An exposed rock on the dimpled, icy plain recalls a giant slug. The outcropping or lone chunk of debris lies along a demarcation line between different portions of the plain. The line resembles the trail of slime left behind by a slug or snail on the move.

But the line isn’t slime; it marks a unique but subtle pattern on the plain. Zoom out and viewers will see Sputnik Planum divided by a series of lines. The icy plain looks like a collection of cells or tectonic plates.

Researchers say the differentiation is created by a deep-lying heat source. As large regions are gradually warmed, they bulge very slightly before cooling and sinking back. The slow warming and cooling routine creates a cell-like convection pattern.

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Jan 11, 2016

French breakthrough in bone-healing foam cement

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, innovation

Bone-foam is about to make broken bones a thing of the past.

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Jan 11, 2016

Insertables: I’ve got IT under my skin

Posted by in categories: electronics, security, wearables

Insertables are here! They are a new class of devices that go literally under your skin! Heffernan, Vetere, and Chang from the University of Melbourne discuss what they are, what they could be used for, their risks and the challenges for the HCI community. Fascinating! @kaylajheffernan # insertables #hci # wearables

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Jan 11, 2016

Intelligent Energy’s hydrogen-powered iPhone lasts a week #CES2016

Posted by in categories: energy, mobile phones

We met Loughborough-based Intelligent Energy at CES, where they showed us a hydrogen-powered iPhone 6 that lasts for a week without a charge.

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