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May 21, 2016

Lethal Autonomous Weapons

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, drones, engineering, geopolitics, robotics/AI, treaties

Biography:
Stuart Russell received his B.A. with first-class honours in physics from Oxford University in 1982 and his Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford in 1986. He then joined the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley, where he is Professor (and formerly Chair) of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and holder of the Smith-Zadeh Chair in Engineering. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Neurological Surgery at UC San Francisco and Vice-Chair of the World Economic Forum’s Council on AI and Robotics. He has published over 150 papers on a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence including machine learning, probabilistic reasoning, knowledge representation, planning, real-time decision making, multitarget tracking, computer vision, computational physiology, and global seismic monitoring. His books include “The Use of Knowledge in Analogy and Induction”, “Do the Right Thing: Studies in Limited Rationality” (with Eric Wefald), and “Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach” (with Peter Norvig).

Abstract:
Autonomous weapons systems select and engage targets without human intervention; they become lethal when those targets include humans. LAWS might include, for example, armed quadcopters that can search for and eliminate enemy combatants in a city, but do not include cruise missiles or remotely piloted drones for which humans make all targeting decisions. The artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics communities face an important ethical decision: whether to support or oppose the development of lethal autonomous weapons systems (LAWS).

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May 21, 2016

Computing a secret, unbreakable key

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics, security

Awesome.


What once took months by some of the world’s leading scientists can now be done in seconds by undergraduate students thanks to software developed at the University of Waterloo’s Institute for Quantum Computing, paving the way for fast, secure quantum communication.

Researchers at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo developed the first available software to evaluate the security of any protocol for Quantum Key Distribution (QKD).

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May 20, 2016

Here’s your chance to help astronomers solve “one of the biggest mysteries of all time”

Posted by in category: cosmology

A team of astronomers investigating “the most mysterious star in our galaxy” have launched a Kickstarter campaign, with hopes to raise $100,000 to find out “Where’s the Flux?”

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May 20, 2016

Project Ara Lives: Google’s Modular Phone Is Ready for You Now

Posted by in category: mobile phones

After more than a year of silence, Google’s wildest idea about smartphones is starting to come true.

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May 20, 2016

Queen announces moves to develop UK’s first commercial spaceport | Belfast Telegraph

Posted by in categories: space, space travel

spaceport

“Driverless cars, drones and a commercial spaceport all featured in the Queen’s Speech.”

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May 20, 2016

MIT researchers unveil perching bee robot

Posted by in categories: drones, robotics/AI

BOSTON, May 19 (UPI) — Engineers at MIT and Harvard have designed a tiny bee-like robot capable of pausing mid-flight to perch on a variety of objects before once again taking to the air. The robot uses static electricity to momentarily cling to the underside of objects.

Robots designed for aerial surveys and related observational tasks, like quadcopters, are currently limited by short flight times. They tend to run out of battery rather quickly. While perching won’t extend a drone’s actual time in the air, the technology could empower UAVs to employ their power more strategically — periodically taking a moment to rest their wings, or blades.

Researchers tested their technology on RoboBee, a bug-like flying robot no bigger than a quarter. A small jolt of static electricity emitted through a tiny foam patch on the bee’s head allows it to land on and adhere to the underside of a plant or to the ceiling.

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May 20, 2016

There IS life after DEATH: Scientists reveal shock findings from groundbreaking study

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Hmmm.


LIFE after death has been “confirmed” by scientists who have discovered consciousness continues even once a person has died.

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May 19, 2016

Take a drive with Bill Gates in a Tesla Model X

Posted by in categories: sustainability, transportation

Billionaire Bill Gates is out with his regular book recommendations and it looks like he is now driving a Tesla Model X.

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May 19, 2016

Google’s Tensor Processing Unit could advance Moore’s Law 7 years into the future

Posted by in categories: computing, futurism

Google unveils custom TPU chip, which it says advances computing performance by three generations.

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May 19, 2016

This science laboratory looks like it should be in a James Bond movie

Posted by in categories: entertainment, science

More Videos by HuffPost UK Tech.

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