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Nov 15, 2019

An Incredible Compilation of Drone Shots From All Over the Globe

Posted by in category: drones

Drone shots have got more intricate and more complex as the years go on, and this compilation by Sam Kolder is one of the best examples of that.

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Nov 15, 2019

A debate between Vadim Gladyshev and Aubrey de Grey

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

I HAVE not heard of or seen this Debate-video??? I thought poor Doctor Aubrey de Grey had shot with “escape velocity” let us say past debates about the probability-guarantee of ending aging. Vadim has his beliefs and yet his beliefs are wrong. {As I have stated and have posted memes for many years that state “WHO IN SCIENCE IS CORRECT??? THE SCIENTISTS WHO ARE WRONG OR THE SCIENTISTS WHO ARE RIGHT??? De Grey is correct as am I. I am a mere data researcher solutions analyst {Yet very dedicated.} So with my dedication I have taken the data of Mankind and found all causes of aging and I have found a cure sitting in data.}.


Is comprehensive damage repair feasible? A debate at Undoing Aging 2019 between Vadim Gladyshev, Harvard Medical School and Aubrey de Grey, SENS Research Foundation.

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Nov 15, 2019

DARPA Is Engineering Glowing Bacteria for Bomb Detection

Posted by in category: engineering

Bomb-sniffing dogs could lose their jobs to bacteria.

Nov 15, 2019

New Lasers May Be Powerful Enough to Drill a Hole in Reality

Posted by in categories: physics, space

The prestigious academic physics journal Physical Review Letters published a paper this week about cutting-edge laser tech — and, if bloggers are to be believed, it could have juicy ramifications.

The paper itself is dry and technical, but the prominent tech blog Ars Technica’s interpretation of its findings is anything but. According to Ars, in fact, the tech it describes could pulse a laser “through fabric of the Universe.”

Nov 15, 2019

Scientists Have Discovered a Multidimensional Universe Inside the Brain

Posted by in category: neuroscience

An exciting discovery has been made by scientists as they have uncovered that the human brain contains structures and shapes that may have up to eleven dimensions.

Nov 15, 2019

Kizoo Technology Capital leads seed round financing at Underdog Pharmaceuticals

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., Nov. 14, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Underdog Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Underdog), and SENS Research Foundation (SRF) today announced the launch of Underdog and the completion of its seed round, providing $3.95 million to promote Underdog’s development of disease-modifying treatments for atherosclerosis and other age-related diseases. SRF also announced two senior appointments.

The Underdog round is led by Michael Greve’s Kizoo Technology Capital, part of the Forever Healthy Group and one of the premier organizations focusing on accelerating rejuvenation biotechnologies. It also includes Oculus co-founder Michael Antonov through Tubus, LLC, and financier Harald McPike through Chambray Worldwide, Ltd.

Underdog was built from an SRF flagship program that has driven two years of applied development designed to explore and repair the underlying causes of cardiovascular disease. Its co-founders are Matthew O’Connor, Ph.D. and Michael Kope, formerly the V.P. of Research and the founding CEO, respectively, of SRF.

Nov 15, 2019

Scientists Create Holograms You Can See, Hear, and Feel

Posted by in categories: energy, holograms

The use of ultrasound waves allows the device to produce audible noise as well as a physical sensation.

“Even if not audible to us, ultrasound is still a mechanical wave and it carries energy through the air,” researcher Diego Martinez Plasencia said in the press release. “Our prototype directs and focuses this energy, which can then stimulate your ears for audio, or stimulate your skin to feel content.”

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Nov 15, 2019

Building to house world’s largest tokamak fusion reactor now complete

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, particle physics

The structure that will house one of the largest and most ambitious energy experiments in history is now complete, with engineers working on the ITER Tokamak Building swinging their last pylon into place in readiness for the nuclear fusion reactor’s assembly stage. Nine years in the making, the facility is built to host the type of super-hot high-speed reactions that take place inside the Sun, and hopefully advance our decades-long pursuit of clean and inexhaustible nuclear fusion energy.

In the works since 1985, ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is a type of nuclear fusion reactor known as a tokamak and is a collaborative project involving thousands of scientists and engineers from 35 countries. These donut-shaped devices are designed to accommodate circular streams of plasma consisting of hydrogen atoms, which are compressed using superconducting magnets so that they fuse together and release monumental amounts of energy.

There are key technological challenges to overcome when it comes to tokamak reactors. Chiefly, these center on bringing them up to the required temperatures and keeping the streams of plasma in place long enough for the reactions to take place.

Nov 15, 2019

This wristband tells you what food to buy based on your DNA

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, food, genetics, health

When an undiagnosed rare genetic disease caused his young son’s kidneys to fail, Professor Chris Toumazou vowed to find a way of uncovering hidden health risks.

The professor of biomedical engineering realised that, although his son’s condition could not have been prevented, the family could have managed his lifestyle very differently had they known about his condition.

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Nov 15, 2019

Research reveals new state of matter: a Cooper pair metal

Posted by in categories: materials, physics

For years, physicists have assumed that Cooper pairs, the electron duos that enable superconductors to conduct electricity without resistance, were two-trick ponies. The pairs either glide freely, creating a superconducting state, or create an insulating state by jamming up within a material, unable to move at all.

But in a new paper published in Science, a team of researchers has shown that Cooper pairs can also conduct electricity with some amount of resistance, like regular metals do. The findings describe an entirely new state of matter, the researchers say, that will require a new theoretical explanation.

“There had been evidence that this would arise in thin film superconductors as they were cooled down toward their , but whether or not that state involved Cooper pairs was an open question,” said Jim Valles, a professor of physics at Brown University and the study’s corresponding author. “We’ve developed a technique that enables us to test that question and we showed that, indeed, Cooper pairs are responsible for transporting charge in this metallic state. What’s interesting is that no one is quite sure at a fundamental level how they do that, so this finding will require some more theoretical and to understand exactly what’s happening.”