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Jun 25, 2019

“Reverse Engineering the Universe”

Posted by in categories: education, engineering, physics, space

Andrei Linde, the Harald Trap Friis Professor of Physics at Stanford University, will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium on Tues., May 8, 2018 entitled “Reverse Engineering the Universe.” This lecture will be held in the Hewlett Teaching Center, Room 200.

Event Sponsor:

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium

Jun 25, 2019

Can we engineer the universe?

Posted by in categories: cosmology, engineering

From harnessing the power of a black hole to giving stars a nudge, the prospect of playing with solar systems puts our engineering feats on Earth into perspective.

Jun 25, 2019

Study says gravity and Higgs boson interacted to save the universe

Posted by in category: cosmology

Circa 2014


One second after the Big Bang, the Higgs boson should have caused a Big Crunch, collapsing the universe to nothing. But gravity saved the day.

Jun 25, 2019

Physicists create world’s first multiverse of universes in the lab

Posted by in categories: cosmology, nanotechnology, physics

Researchers at the University of Maryland, College Park and Towson University are reporting that they have created multiple universes inside a laboratory-created multiverse — a world first.

To be exact, the researchers created a metamaterial — like those used to fashion invisibility cloaks — that, when light passes through it, multiple universes are formed within it. These universes, called Minkowski spacetimes, are similar to our own, except they more neatly tie up Einstein’s theory of special relativity by including time as a fourth dimension.

While this is rather extraordinary, the experimental setup is actually quite simple — though definitely rather unconventional. The multiverse is created inside a solution of cobalt in kerosene. This fluid isn’t usually considered a metamaterial, but lead researcher Igor Smolyaninov and co found that by applying a magnetic field, the ferromagnetic nanoparticles of cobalt line up in neat columns. When light passes through these columns, it behaves as if it’s in a Minkowski universe.

Jun 25, 2019

New searches for supersymmetry presented by ATLAS experiment

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics, quantum physics

The Standard Model is a remarkably successful but incomplete theory. Supersymmetry (SUSY) offers an elegant solution to the Standard Model’s limitations, extending it to give each particle a heavy “superpartner” with different spin properties (an important quantum number distinguishing matter particles from force particles and the Higgs boson). For example, sleptons are the spin 0 superpartners of spin 1/2 electrons, muons and tau leptons, while charginos and neutralinos are the spin 1/2 counterparts of the spin 0 Higgs bosons (SUSY postulates a total of five Higgs bosons) and spin 1 gauge bosons.

If these superpartners exist and are not too massive, they will be produced at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and could be hiding in data collected by the ATLAS detector. However, unlike most processes at the LHC, which are governed by strong force interactions, these superpartners would be created through the much weaker electroweak interaction, thus lowering their production rates. Further, most of these new SUSY particles are expected to be unstable. Physicists can only search for them by tracing their decay products—typically into a known Standard Model particle and the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), which could be stable and non-interacting, thus forming a natural dark matter candidate.

On 20 May, 2019, at the Large Hadron Collider Physics (LHCP) conference in Puebla, Mexico, and at the SUSY2019 conference in Corpus Christi, U.S., the ATLAS Collaboration presented numerous new searches for SUSY based on the full LHC Run 2 dataset (taken between 2015 and 2018), including two particularly challenging searches for electroweak SUSY. Both searches target particles that are produced at extremely low rates at the LHC, and decay into Standard Model particles that are themselves difficult to reconstruct. The large amount of data successfully collected by ATLAS in Run 2 provides a unique opportunity to explore these scenarios with new analysis techniques.

Jun 25, 2019

Reverse Engineering the Universe

Posted by in categories: cosmology, engineering, singularity

Essentially if you can enginneer a planet to a galaxy you could eventually get to a universe level of enginneering which may be needed if the universe keeps expanding. You could control the great forces of the universe to keep it stable so that it will not die out or collapse into a singularity. They say many things that gravity in the begginning kept the universe stable with dark matter that keeps things expanding other claims say that basically the universe could colapse into a single point that our universe may be a jet of another universe. Others say we live in essentially a bubble surrounded by other universes. I think though if we can reverse engineer a universe we can control our own. This would prevent our own universe from dying out or even the sun from dying out. There have been minor experiments of small universes made in the lab this could explain our own universe. But essentially we could have a perfect universe where nothing dies out or collapses into a single point in theory. Essentially an artificial universe where all the forces are controlled.

Jun 25, 2019

Increasing NAD+ Levels for Super Longevity at RAADfest

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Another great addition to #RAADfest2019 #cureaging #NAD #superlongevity


Dr. Nichola Conlon, Nuchido CEO & Co-founder, chats with James Strole, Director of the Coalition for Radical Life Extension, about what she’s bringing to RAADfest 2019: Increasing NAD+ levels in middle-aged people to a level comparable with people 17 years younger with the data to back it up.

Nuchido has pioneered the use of systems pharmacology and clinical research to boost and maintain NAD. In a scientific world-first, the team achieved the biggest increase of NAD in humans reported by any scientific group.

Continue reading “Increasing NAD+ Levels for Super Longevity at RAADfest” »

Jun 25, 2019

A Tiny Worm Frozen in Siberian Permafrost For 42,000 Years Was Just Brought Back to Life

Posted by in category: food

O.o!


Samples of permafrost sediment frozen for the past 42,000 years were recently thawed to reveal living nematodes.

Within weeks the roundworms began to move and eat, setting a record for the time an animal can survive cryogenic preservation.

Continue reading “A Tiny Worm Frozen in Siberian Permafrost For 42,000 Years Was Just Brought Back to Life” »

Jun 25, 2019

NASA’s About to Send an Atomic Clock Into Orbit, And It’ll Revolutionise Space Travel

Posted by in category: satellites

On 24 June 2019, NASA is sending an atomic clock into space. Not just any old atomic clock, either. It’s up to 50 times more accurate than the atomic clocks aboard GPS satellites, its precision only changing by one second every 10 million years.

It’s only the size of a toaster, yet it could revolutionise deep-space travel.

It’s called the Deep Space Atomic Clock, and the next year will be crucial to its development, with NASA monitoring its performance as it orbits Earth at an altitude of 720 kilometres (447 miles) — nearly twice the distance from Earth as the International Space Station. It’ll be launched aboard SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket.

Jun 25, 2019

This camera app uses AI to erase people from your photographs

Posted by in categories: humor, robotics/AI

Bye Bye Camera is an iOS app built for the “post-human world,” says Damjanski, a mononymous artist based in New York City who helped create the software. Why post-human? Because it uses AI to remove people from images and paint over their absence.

“One joke we always make about it is: ‘finally, you can take a selfie without yourself,’” Damjanski tells The Verge.

The app costs $2.99 from the App Store, and, fair warning here, it’s not very good — or at least, it’s not flawless. The app is slow and removes people with a great deal of mess, leaving behind a smear of pixels like an AI hit man sending a message. If you’re looking to edit out political opponents from your Instagram, you’d be better off using Photoshop. But if you want to mess around with machine learning magic, Bye Bye Camera is good fun.