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Feb 7, 2016

DARPA’s New ‘Neural’ Microchip Could Let Drones Think Like a Human

Posted by in categories: computing, drones, military, neuroscience, robotics/AI

“Full exploitation of this information is a major challenge,” officials with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) wrote in a 2009 brief on “deep learning.”

“Human observation and analysis of [intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance] assets is essential, but the training of humans is both expensive and time-consuming. Human performance also varies due to individuals’ capabilities and training, fatigue, boredom, and human attentional capacity.”

Working with a team of researchers at MIT, DARPA is hoping to take all of that human know-how and shrink it down into processing unit no bigger than your cellphone, using a microchip known as “Eyeriss.” The concept relies on “neural networks;” computerized memory networks based on the workings of the human brain.

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Feb 7, 2016

Eyeriss is MIT’s 168-Core Chip That Brinngs Powerful AI to Mobiles

Posted by in categories: computing, robotics/AI

MIT researchers have presented the Eyeriss chips that have 10 times more power than mobile GPUs and use deep learning for local AI functions.

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Feb 6, 2016

Animated GIF — Find & Share on GIPHY

Posted by in category: futurism

Self balanced surface using PID Controller.


Discover & Share this Animated GIF with everyone you know. GIPHY is how you search, share, discover, and create GIFs.

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Feb 6, 2016

A Cellular Atlas: This Algorithm Can Predict How To Grow Virtually Any Cell Type

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, information science

Researchers at the University of Bristol have created ‘Mogrify’ — an algorithm that can predict how to reprogram virtually any type of cell

One way of creating new cells is with stem cells. The most famous of these are embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, the latter made from your own cells. While these cells have immense potential, the process of creating them is complicated and not without error. Coaxing these cells into a new type once you’ve made them is also easier said than done.

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Feb 6, 2016

2016: The Year of “More Than Moore”

Posted by in category: futurism

When people say “More Than Moore,” they are referring to ways to increase the density and decrease the size of their designs via methods other than simply scaling the transistors.

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Feb 6, 2016

Don’t trust this lipstick-applying robot with your face

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

We can safely say that the position as a make up artist is safe from AI for now.


A mini factory-style robot arm tries its mechanical hand at applying makeup. The results aren’t pretty.

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Feb 6, 2016

Scientists are racing to successfully preserve and reanimate a human brain

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Just when you believe things cannot get more stranger; a “Frankenstein” fund is created for a competition in the UK to bring a brain back to life.


The Brain Preservation Foundation is offerings a cash prize of $100,000 to anyone who can successfully develop a way to preserve and reanimate a human brain.

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Feb 6, 2016

Microbiologists discover caffeine-adapted bacteria living in the sludge in their office coffee machine

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, habitats

We can just imagine the scenario that spawned this paper: a bunch of microbiologists sitting around the lab coffee machine, looking for a way to procrastinate, and voila…coffee machine microbiome! Here, the researchers not only sampled bacteria from 10 different Nespresso machines, but they also “conducted a dynamic monitoring of the colonization process in a new machine” (charge new lab coffee machine to grant: check). They found that bacteria rapidly colonized the sludge that sits inside the machines, and many of these species were adapted to the high levels of caffeine and other compounds found in coffee. We’d suggest that they study what lives in the office fridge next, but really–not even a microbiologist wants to go there!

The coffee-machine bacteriome: biodiversity and colonisation of the wasted coffee tray leach

“Microbial communities are ubiquitous in both natural and artificial environments. However, microbial diversity is usually reduced under strong selection pressures, such as those present in habitats rich in recalcitrant or toxic compounds displaying antimicrobial properties. Caffeine is a natural alkaloid present in coffee, tea and soft drinks with well-known antibacterial properties. Here we present the first systematic analysis of coffee machine-associated bacteria. We sampled the coffee waste reservoir of ten different Nespresso machines and conducted a dynamic monitoring of the colonization process in a new machine. Our results reveal the existence of a varied bacterial community in all the machines sampled, and a rapid colonisation process of the coffee leach. The community developed from a pioneering pool of enterobacteria and other opportunistic taxa to a mature but still highly variable microbiome rich in coffee-adapted bacteria. The bacterial communities described here, for the first time, are potential drivers of biotechnologically relevant processes including decaffeination and bioremediation.”

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Feb 6, 2016

Create VR experiences within VR itself using Unreal Engine

Posted by in categories: computing, habitats, neuroscience, virtual reality

Meet “Unreal Engine”; VR’s friend in VR game creations.


Epic Games has been teasing “the future of VR development” recently, and the team is finally ready to tell everyone what that is: Creating virtual reality content within virtual reality itself, using the full version of its Unreal Engine 4. Epic cofounder Tim Sweeney says that while the company’s been supporting the likes of the Oculus Rift from the outset, the irony is that, up to this point, the experiences we’ve seen so far have been developed using the same tools as traditional video games. “Now you can go into VR, have the entire Unreal editor functioning and do it live,” he says. “It almost gives you god-like powers to manipulate the world.”

So rather than using the same 2D tools (a keyboard, mouse and computer monitor) employed in traditional game development, people making experiences for VR in Unreal can now use a head-mounted display and motion controllers to manipulate objects in a 3D space. “Your brain already knows how to do this stuff because we all have an infinite amount of experience picking up and moving 3D objects,” Sweeney says. “The motions you’d do in the real world, you’d do in the editor and in the way you’d expect to; intuitively.”

Continue reading “Create VR experiences within VR itself using Unreal Engine” »

Feb 6, 2016

New Microchip Could Increase Military Intelligence Powers

Posted by in categories: military, neuroscience, robotics/AI

More news on DARPA’s new deep learning microchip for the military.


A military-funded breakthrough in microchips opens the door to portable deep learning.

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