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Feb 2, 2023

Evidence found of tidal impact on the plasmasphere

Posted by in categories: particle physics, space

An international team of space scientists reports that the moon exerts a tidal impact on the plasmasphere. For their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the group used data from multiple spacecraft over a nearly 40-year period to measure tidal perturbations in the plasmapause. Balázs Heilig, with the Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science, in Hungary, has published a News & Views piece in the same journal issue, explaining the nature of the plasmasphere and outlining the work in this new effort.

Early scientists found a connection between the tides and the movement of the thousands of years ago. More recent evidence suggests the moon’s pull acts on the ionosphere as well. In this new study, the researchers wondered if the moon might also have an impact on the plasmasphere.

The plasmasphere is a toroidal mass of plasma that surrounds the Earth. It lies beyond the ionosphere and is made up mostly of electrons and protons. Its particles are charged by the ionosphere, and its outer boundary is known as the plasmapause.

Feb 2, 2023

Here’s how NASA could have tried to rescue the crew of Space Shuttle Columbia if they had known the spacecraft was going to disintegrate on re-entry

Posted by in category: space

On Jan. 16, 2003 space shuttle Columbia left Earth for its 28th and last flight. Even though at the time building the International Space Station was the main goal of the shuttle program, STS-107 (Columbia’s final mission) emphasized pure research, according to Space.com.

The seven-member crew — Rick Husband, commander; Michael Anderson, payload commander; David Brown, mission specialist; Kalpana Chawla, mission specialist; Laurel Clark, mission specialist; William McCool, pilot; and Ilan Ramon, payload specialist from the Israeli Space Agency — had spent 24 hours a day doing science experiments in two shifts.

The seven astronauts on board Columbia were killed on Feb. 1, 2003 when the space shuttle broke up while it was returning to Earth.

Continue reading “Here’s how NASA could have tried to rescue the crew of Space Shuttle Columbia if they had known the spacecraft was going to disintegrate on re-entry” »

Feb 2, 2023

The space between Earth and the moon is about to get a little more crowded

Posted by in category: space travel

With multiple nations and private companies now setting their sights on missions to the moon, experts say cislunar space — the area between Earth and the moon — could become strategically important, potentially opening up competition over resources and positioning, and even sparking geopolitical conflicts.

Feb 2, 2023

Human 2.0 what it means to be human past present and future

Posted by in category: futurism

Dropbox is a free service that lets you bring your photos, docs, and videos anywhere and share them easily. Never email yourself a file again!

Feb 2, 2023

Could a hidden variable explain the weirdness of quantum physics?

Posted by in category: quantum physics

Weirdness of quantum entanglement is explained by hidden variables? If so, we have never found them.

Feb 2, 2023

Seqenenre Tao, the pharaoh who died in battle

Posted by in category: energy

Seqenenre Tao was the pharaoh who ruled southern Egypt in the late 17th dynasty, roughly between 1,558 and 1,553 BC.

That was a troubled time. The Hyksos (whose name in ancient Egyptian was Heqau-khasut, “the rulers of foreign lands”) occupied the northern part of Egypt and took Avaris (present-day Tell el Dabaa) as their capital during a time called the “second intermediate period” (1650−1550 BC).

Although the pharaohs maintained power over the south (with capital in Thebes), the entire territory was forced to pay tribute to the invaders.

Feb 2, 2023

Is Brain Learning Weaker Than Artificial Intelligence?

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

Summary: Artificial neural networks based on human brain dynamics can outperform current deep learning models in learning capabilities.

Source: Bar-Ilan University.

Traditionally, artificial intelligence stems from human brain dynamics. However, brain learning is restricted in a number of significant aspects compared to deep learning (DL).

Feb 1, 2023

Rivian announces plans to layoff 840 workers amid EV price wars

Posted by in category: finance

Yahoo Finance automotive reporter Pras Subramanian explains Rivian’s recent round of layoffs amid pressures to ramp up its EV production targets.
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Feb 1, 2023

New map of the universe’s matter reveals a possible hole in our understanding of the cosmos

Posted by in categories: cosmology, internet, mapping

Scientists have made one of the most precise maps of the universe’s matter, and it shows that something may be missing in our best model of the cosmos.

Created by pooling data from two telescopes that observe different types of light, the new map revealed that the universe is less “clumpy” than previous models predicted — a potential sign that the vast cosmic web that connects galaxies is less understood than scientists thought.

According to our current understanding, the cosmic web is a gigantic network of crisscrossing celestial superhighways paved with hydrogen gas and dark matter. Taking shape in the chaotic aftermath of the Big Bang, the web’s tendrils formed as clumps from the roiling broth of the young universe; where multiple strands of the web intersected, galaxies eventually formed. But the new map, published Jan. 31 as three separate studies in the journal Physical Review D, shows that in many parts of the universe, matter is less clumped together and more evenly spread out than theory predicts it should be.

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Feb 1, 2023

Robert M. Sapolsky

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Robert Sapolsky’s book is now available for pre-order!

𝙊𝙣𝙚 𝙤𝙛 𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙜𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙩 𝙗𝙚𝙝𝙖𝙫𝙞𝙤𝙧𝙖𝙡 𝙨𝙘𝙞𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙞𝙨𝙩𝙨, 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙗𝙚𝙨𝙩𝙨𝙚𝙡𝙡𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙖𝙪𝙩𝙝𝙤𝙧 𝙤𝙛 𝘽𝙚𝙝𝙖𝙫𝙚, 𝙥𝙡𝙪𝙢𝙗𝙨 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙙𝙚𝙥𝙩𝙝𝙨 𝙤𝙛 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙨𝙘𝙞𝙚𝙣𝙘𝙚 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙥𝙝𝙞𝙡𝙤𝙨𝙤𝙥𝙝𝙮 𝙤𝙛 𝙙𝙚𝙘𝙞𝙨𝙞𝙤𝙣-𝙢𝙖𝙠𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙩𝙤 𝙢𝙤𝙪𝙣𝙩 𝙖 𝙙𝙚𝙫𝙖𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙘𝙖𝙨𝙚 𝙖𝙜𝙖𝙞𝙣𝙨𝙩 𝙛𝙧𝙚𝙚 𝙬𝙞𝙡𝙡, 𝙖𝙣 𝙖𝙧𝙜𝙪𝙢𝙚𝙣𝙩 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝 𝙥𝙧𝙤𝙛𝙤𝙪𝙣𝙙 𝙘𝙤𝙣𝙨𝙚𝙦𝙪𝙚𝙣𝙘𝙚𝙨.


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