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Aug 31, 2015

5G, one wireless technology to rule them all?

Posted by in category: internet

The progress from 2G to 3G, and from 3G to 4G LTE has been primarily about improvements to the standards related to cellular technology. However the move from 4G to 5G could be quite different. …But, there is more to 5G than just super fast cellular tech. There is an active and open discussion going on to see if 5G can in fact become the de facto for all wireless standards. No more Wi-Fi, no more Bluetooth, no more 4G LTE, just 5G, one wireless technology to rule them all.


There is an active discussion going on to see if 5G can become the de facto for all wireless standards. No more Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, or 4G LTE, just 5G.

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Aug 31, 2015

Double black hole is powering quasar, astronomers find

Posted by in categories: cosmology, space

Astronomers have discovered a galaxy is being powered by a quasar that contains two black holes whirling about each other.

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Aug 31, 2015

Life Might Spread Across Universe Like an ‘Epidemic’ in New Math Theory

Posted by in category: alien life

As astronomers get closer to finding potential signatures of life on faraway planets, a new mathematical description shows how to understand life’s spread — and to determine if it’s jumping from star to star. “Life could spread from host star to host star in a pattern similar to the outbreak of an epidemic,” study co-author Avi Loeb of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) said in a statement.

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Aug 31, 2015

‘Decorated’ graphene is a superconductor

Posted by in category: materials

Lithium-doped graphene turns out to be a conventional superconductor with a transition temperature of 5.9 K.


Depositing lithium on 2D material generates Cooper pairs.

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Aug 31, 2015

Quantum revolution: China set to launch ‘hack proof’ quantum communications network

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, particle physics, security

China is set to complete the installation of the world’s longest quantum communication network stretching 2,000km (1,240miles) from Beijing to Shanghai by 2016, say scientists leading the project. Quantum communications technology is considered to be “unhackable” and allows data to be transferred at the speed of light.

By 2030, the Chinese network would be extended worldwide, the South China Morning Post reported. It would make the country the first major power to publish a detailed schedule to put the technology into extensive, large-scale use.

The development of quantum communications technology has accelerated in the last five years. The technology works by two people sharing a message which is encrypted by a secret key made up of quantum particles, such as polarized photons. If a third person tries to intercept the photons by copying the secret key as it travels through the network, then the eavesdropper will be revealed by virtue of the laws of quantum mechanics – which dictate that the act of interfering with the network affects the behaviour of the key in an unpredictable manner.

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Aug 31, 2015

Let’s End Incarceration and Just Have Drones Supervise Criminals

Posted by in categories: computing, drones, law enforcement, robotics/AI

New article on how tech can help achieve free education while also shrinking the prison system:


Micro drones, robot guards, and tracking chips will turn convicts into tax-paying, law-abiding citizens.

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Aug 31, 2015

How Technology Is Fueling The Push Toward Solar

Posted by in category: sustainability

Solar energy in the United States has seen immense momentum throughout the years. When the Solar Energy Industries Association released its annual report in 2008, it concluded that U.S. solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity reached a total of 1.183 gigawatts — a stellar achievement at the time.

Contrast that figure with today, and the number is dwarfed by the United States’ installed capacity of 21.3 gigawatts, enough energy to power 4.3 million homes.

As to what is powering this widespread adoption, one only needs to look at the residential market. According to recently released research by GTM, 72 percent of the market growth in 2014 is a result of solar tech companies offering diverse financing solutions and easy-to-navigate web platforms. Going solar for homeowners has become as easy as online shopping.

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Aug 31, 2015

Seasteading 20 Questions, 20 Answers, 20 Seconds Each = PechaKucha! | The Seasteading Institute

Posted by in category: governance

Aug 30, 2015

Honda’s Asimo: the penalty-taking, bar-tending robot

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

Auto Express’ Mat Watson meets Honda’s robot Asimo in Brussels, where he plays football, dances and serves a drink!

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Aug 30, 2015

AI Dangerous for Economics? The Other Threat Flying Under Radars

Posted by in categories: economics, machine learning, security

Dr. Nils J. Nilsson spent almost a lifetime in the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) before writing and publishing his book, The Quest for Artificial Intelligence (2009). I recently had the opportunity to speak with the former Stanford computer science professor, now retired at the age of 82, and reflect on the earlier accomplishments that have led to some of the current trends in AI, as well as the serious economic and security considerations that need to be made about AI as society moves ahead in the coming decades.

The Early AI that Powers Today’s Trends

One key contribution of early AI developments included rules-based expert systems, such as MYCIN, which was developed in the mid-1970s by Ted Shortliffe and colleagues at Stanford University. The information built into the diagnostic system was gleaned from medical diagnosticians, and the system would then ask questions based on that information. A person could then type in answers about a patient’s tests, symptoms, etc., and the program would then attempt to diagnose diseases and prescribe therapy.

“Bringing us more up to the future was the occurrence of huge databases (in the 1990s) — sometimes called big data — and the ability of computers to mine that data and find information and make inferences,” remarks Nils. This made possible the new work on face recognition, speech recognition, and language translation. “AI really had what might be called a take off at this time.” Both of these technologies also feed into the launch of IBM’s Watson Healthcare, which combines advanced rules-based systems with big data capabilities and promises to give healthcare providers access to powerful tools in a cloud-based data sharing hub.

Work in neural networks, another catalyst, went through two phases, an earlier phase in the 1950s and 1960s and a latter phase in the 1980s and 1990s. “The second phase (of neural networks) allowed…people to make changes in the connected strength in those networks and multiple layers, and this allowed neural networks that can steer and drive automobiles.” More primitive networks led to the cutting-edge work being done by today’s scientists in the self-driven automobile industry via companies like Tesla and Google.

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