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Jul 28, 2016

Scientists Synthesize Liquid Fuel from Solar Energy

Posted by in categories: solar power, sustainability

The nextgen of Solar and fuel energy.


Scientists have just discovered a way to directly convert solar energy into a synthetic fuel using carbon dioxide. Current solar technologies operate in either photovoltaic solar or thermal solar. Photovoltaic solar energy is generated through solar panels, which are typically seen on the roofs of houses and many solar plants. The other method of thermal solar is typically only used in large-scale energy plants, as it used mirrors to focus solar energy to heat a liquid which then powers turbines. Both methods, however, involve the conversion of solar energy into electricity. While electricity is useful, much energy is lost in the storing of electricity, something that the conversion process to liquid fuel overcomes.

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Jul 28, 2016

Why Virtual Reality Will Be the Most Social Computing Platform Yet — By Kyle Russell | Andreessen Horowitz

Posted by in category: virtual reality

“The key to understanding why “social VR” will be important is to think about virtual (and augmented) reality as a computing platform, rather than as a PC peripheral for gaming.”

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Jul 28, 2016

How science could help cyclists to keep pedalling for longer

Posted by in categories: energy, food, military, science

Nice.


Elite endurance athletes could be able to keep going for longer thanks to a new drink developed to give soldiers extra energy in battle, a study using former Olympians has found.

Scientists found that cyclists using the drink, which temporarily switches the body’s energy source from glucose to ketones, could travel an extra quarter of a mile than those taking a different energy supplement.

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Jul 28, 2016

NIH-Funded Scientists Identify 97 Previously Unknown Regions of the Brain

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Last week, scientists funded by the NIH’s Human Connectome Project—a precursor to the BRAIN Initiative—identified 97 previously unknown areas of the brain’s cortex.

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Jul 28, 2016

Air Force awards contract for deceptive cyber research

Posted by in category: cybercrime/malcode

The Air Force awarded a contract for research in deceptive cyber to be used toward network defense.

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Jul 28, 2016

Dark Patterns are designed to trick you (and they’re all over the Web)

Posted by in category: internet

Risk Assessment —

Dark Patterns are designed to trick you (and they’re all over the Web)

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Jul 28, 2016

FBI’s Mass Hack Hit 50 Computers in Austria

Posted by in category: cybercrime/malcode

Revelations that the ‘Operation Pacifier’ child porn investigation extended to Austria too shows the extent of the FBI’s reach overseas.

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Jul 28, 2016

U.S. wary on biotech advances; gene editing, CRISPR ‘raising urgency’

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, ethics

Hmmm.


We can rebuild him; we have the technology—but Americans question if we should in a new survey designed to assess attitudes to modern biotechnology advances.

A new report, based on a survey of 4,700 U.S. adults coming out of the Pew Research Center, looked at a range of views on certain advances in biology, with opinions split on the ethics and long-term problems associated with enhancing human capacity.

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Jul 28, 2016

Getting light in shape with metamaterials

Posted by in categories: nanotechnology, quantum physics, supercomputing

A team built a specialized, layered structure with tiny metallic cavities that improves the light conversion efficiency by orders of magnitude.

ncident laser beam (top of the figure)  illuminating an array of nanoscale gold resonators on the surface of a quantum well semiconductor

Artist’s rendering of an incident laser beam (top of the figure) illuminating an array of nanoscale gold resonators on the surface of a “quantum well” semiconductor (slab in figure). (A quantum well is a thin layer that can restrict the movement of electrons to that layer.) The incoming laser beam interacts with the array and the quantum wells and is converted into two new laser beams with different wavelengths. Changing the size, shape, and arrangement of the resonators can be used for beam focusing, beam steering, or control of the beam’s angular momentum. (Image: Sandia National Laboratories)

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Jul 28, 2016

Improving computer graphics with quantum mechanics

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, quantum physics

Nice article; I do need to mention that more and more screen displays are moving to Q-Dot technology. So, computer graphics is being enriched in multiple ways by Quantum.


Caltech applied scientists have developed a new way to simulate large-scale motion numerically using the mathematics that govern the universe at the quantum level.

The , presented at the International Conference and Exhibition on Computer Graphics & Interactive Techniques (SIGGRAPH), held in Anaheim, California, from July 24–28, allows computers to more accurately simulate vorticity, the spinning motion of a flowing fluid.

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